Eleanor Holmes Norton

National Mall Softball Reprieve Was Example of D.C.-Federal Communication
D.C. delegate to Congress praises National Park Service for listening

A member of “The Branch” softball team jumps up to catch the ball while warming up before a game against “Torthogs” on the grass of the National Mall on Wednesday, June 3, 2009. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

In November, the National Park Service stunned many when it announced that it would be closing wide swaths of the National Mall to organized sports and would be raising fees elsewhere.

But in a partial victory for sports on the Mall, the park service now says it is withdrawing that proposed ban and will instead conduct a formal study to come up with a “comprehensive” new plan.

Shooting of Capitol Police Officers Was Turning Point for Department
20 years later, department has seen budget nearly quadruple as concerns rose

Members of the United States Capitol Police honor guard stand with a wreath during the annual United States Capitol Police memorial service on May 8 honoring the four USCP officers who have died in the line of duty. This year is the 20th anniversary of the deaths of Officer Jacob Chestnut and Detective John Gibson while protecting the U.S. Capitol from a gunman'’s attack on July 24, 1998. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It has been 20 years since a man with a gun walked into the U.S. Capitol and went on a shooting rampage that killed two Capitol Police personnel and set off two decades of hardening security around Capitol Hill.

Security protocols have ramped up everywhere from airports to museums, and much of the change is attributed to the terror attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. But on Capitol Hill, the deaths of Detective John M. Gibson and Officer Jacob J. Chestnut on July 24, 1998, prompted big changes even before the attacks on New York and the Pentagon.

Senate Democrats Likely to Oppose Push to Block Health Insurance Mandate
Desire to keep contentious amendments off spending bills might prevail

Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., chairs the Appropriations subcommittee where any amendment on the D.C. health insurance mandate might come up first in the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A Republican amendment to a House-passed spending package that would ban the District of Columbia from implementing an individual health insurance coverage requirement is unlikely to gain steam as the Senate prepares to take up a similar measure.

It’s not clear yet if any Senate Republicans will introduce a similar amendment when the Financial Services and Interior-Environment package reaches the Senate floor, but it would likely face fierce minority opposition in the chamber, where Democrats are defending the 2010 health care law at every opportunity.

20 Years Ago, a Deadly Shooting in the Capitol Changed Life on the Hill Forever
 

On July 24, 1998, a schizophrenic man with a gun walked into the U.S. Capitol. The ensuing rampage resulted in the deaths of two Capitol police officers, Detective John M. Gibson and Officer Jacob J. Chestnut, who saved the lives of Majority Whip Tom DeLay, his staff and countless others. The incident changed the Capitol community forever, boosting momentum for construction of the Capitol Visitors Center and much of the security we experience today.

Roll Call looked back at that tragic day, speaking to lawmakers, law enforcement and journalists who covered the story.

Trump ‘Insults’ District Residents With Unilateral Court Picks, D.C. Delegate Says
Trump administration wants to nominate D.C. prosecutor to supervisory position

Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) said Monday that the Trump administration has bypassed her on selections of federal law enforcement officials serving the district. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The District of Columbia’s congressional delegate took the Trump administration to task Monday for “refusing to consult with her” on the nominations of a series of federal law enforcement officials who would serve the district.

“The Trump administration continues to ignore the voice and input of D.C. residents when selecting federal officials to serve them,” Eleanor Holmes Norton said in a press release.

National Children’s Museum Means Changes for Federal Triangle
Beleaguered museum looks to make third time the charm

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, shown here in May, welcomed home the National Children’s Museum on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the National Children’s Museum seeks to relaunch a half-block from the Mall, the Federal Triangle metro stop could get a rebranding of its own.

The museum — after years of nomadism and financial struggles — is slated to open in March, and a D.C. councilman says he will push to rename the stop.

With No D.C. Representation, Virginia and Maryland Senators Step Up for the Capitals
Senators who represent the city built on betting have no one to bet with

Flags of the Las Vegas Golden Knights and soon-to-be Las Vegas Raiders hang in Nevada Sen. Dean Heller’s office in the Hart Building on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Las Vegas loves to gamble, but it’s not so easy for those who represent it this Stanley Cup final.

Members of Congress often make friendly wagers on sports championships, but so far they’ve managed only one bet on the Washington Capitals-Las Vegas Knights series. That’s because there’s only one person who represents D.C.

Keep Hands Off Local Laws, DC Politicians Tell Congress
Budget riders for Washington include stopping legalized recreational marijuana, abortion funding

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks during a news conference in the Capitol on Wednesday to discuss efforts to protect the district’s local laws. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

District of Columbia politicians want Congress to stop trying to take control of local laws.

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton and Mayor Muriel Bowser held a press conference Wednesday to speak out against legislative policy riders in this year’s Washington budget.

Three Big Hurdles for D.C. as Advocates Lobby for Statehood
Any form of Congress’ voting power would still have a few problems to overcome

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., speaks during a press conference to commemorate the renaming of the historic U.S. Post Office located at 2 Massachusetts Avenue NE in honor of Dr. Dorothy I. Height. Norton has been a longtime advocate of D.C. statehood. (Douglas Graham/Roll Call file photo)

Washington advocates used the leadup to Monday’s D.C. Emancipation Day celebrations to push once again for the District of Columbia to become a state.

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., has been a leader in the D.C. statehood effort for decades — she’s known for asking to be referred around the Capitol as representative, despite her non-voting status. Norton spoke about D.C. statehood in Congress again Thursday night ahead of Emancipation Day.