Elijah E Cummings

All Russia investigation transcripts from House Intelligence to be released
The committee voted to release the transcripts Wednesday and announced it will relaunch the probe, focusing on five key areas of interest

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, leaves a briefing with CIA Director Gina Haspel in the Capitol Visitor Center with House leaders on December 12, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Intelligence Committee will release all transcripts from its 2017 and 2018 Russia investigation to special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation — And eventually, the documents will be released to the public.

The committee voted on the step to release the transcripts Wednesday at its organizational meeting, where it announced it will relaunch the probe and focus on five key areas of interest. The release peels back the curtain on closed-door discussions the then-Republican-controlled committee had with multiple close associates of President Donald Trump.

Democrats running for president want presidential transitions to share security clearance applicant lists
Elizabeth Warren is among the headliners on the new legislation

Sens. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Kamala Harris, D-Calif., are seen during testimony by Judge Brett Kavanaugh during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most of the Senate Democrats running for president are headlining an effort to force presidential transitions to turn over lists of security clearance applicants to Congress.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren is headlining the effort, and co-sponsors include potential or confirmed 2020 hopefuls like Cory Booker of New Jersey, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Kamala Harris of California and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota.

Road ahead: State of the Union, plus Cohen, Barr, Whitaker and Trump tax returns
Legislating will not be the focus of the week for the House or Senate

House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff, D-Calif., has announced his panel will be hearing from Michael Cohen this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Normally, the State of the Union address would dominate this week’s headlines on Capitol Hill — but it just might be overshadowed by what’s scheduled to happen at the end of the week.

On Friday, the House Judiciary Committee will hold a public hearing with acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and the Intelligence Committee will conduct a closed-door deposition of Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer.

House, Senate panels begin hearings seeking drug cost solutions
Future hearings will likely focus more on legislative proposals, and at some point members hope that drug companies will share their ideas

From left, Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Mark Meadows, R-N.C., talk during a House Oversight and Reform Committee business meeting in Rayburn Building on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers emphasized the steep cost of the diabetes treatment insulin and ways to use Medicare and Medicaid to discourage companies from setting high prices as Congress kicked off a series of drug price hearings Tuesday.

Hearings before the Senate Finance and the House Oversight and Reform committees featured academics and patient advocates as lawmakers in both chambers investigate why drug prices are high and what Congress can do about it.

House Republicans praise Democrats’ subpoena restraint (so far)

Restraint on subpoenas and office space politics engendered bipartisanship early this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Subpoenas and office space, so often the source of lawmaker squabbles, engendered some bipartisanship this week, including kind words from Republicans to Democrats about how they’re running the House.

On Monday night Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia, newly installed ranking member on the House Judiciary Committee, sent a letter praising Democratic Chairman Jerrold Nadler for his leadership of the panel.

Michael Cohen postpones testimony, cites Trump’s ‘threats’ against family
Trump had tweeted to his supporters last week to ‘Watch [Cohen’s] father-in-law’

Michael Cohen, a former personal attorney for President Trump, was to testify before Congress on Feb. 7. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Michael Cohen has postponed his Feb. 7 testimony in front of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform due to “ongoing threats against his family” from President Donald Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani.

Cohen's lawyer, Lanny Davis, announced the cancellation in an emailed statement on Wednesday, citing  Cohen’s continued cooperation with “ongoing investigations” as a reason for delaying his House testimony, in addition to the threats from Trump and Giuliani.

House Democrats to investigate security clearances for Kushner, Flynn, Gorka, others
Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings requested a trove of documents on Trump team‘s security clearance process

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., talks on his smartwatch before a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in Rayburn Building on November 15, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats launched their first formal investigation into the Trump administration Wednesday, announcing that they will probe “grave breaches with the security clearance process at the White House and the transition team” involving senior Trump cabinet officials.

In a letter to White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, House Committee on Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah Cummings specifically named nine current and former Trump officials, including former national security adviser Michael Flynn, senior adviser Jared Kushner, and former deputy assistant to the president Sebastian Gorka. Cummings requested a trove of documents about the Trump administration and transition team’s security clearance process.

AOC, Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna Pressley seated on Oversight Committee
Spots for the progressive freshman signal future fireworks in investigative hearings

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., will join the House Oversight Committee. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new crop of progressive freshman has been seated on the House of Representative’s investigative committee — signaling future fireworks and higher C-SPAN ratings for its hearings this year.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass. — who all tack to the left and have shown an appetite for aggressively challenging the White House and corporate interests — have been tapped to join the House Oversight and Reform Committee, Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Tuesday night.

Congressional scandals ain’t what they used to be
The modern playbook for surviving scandal was created by a Democrat

Activists at a Sept. 26 rally sponsored by the conservative group FreedomWorks urge Jim Jordan to run for speaker, past scandals or no. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

Jim Jordan has a reputation.

He is a pit bull: Video clips of the Ohio Republican tearing into witnesses in committee is like sweet nectar to many conservatives.

This time House Democrats might support D.C. statehood
Attitudes have changed since the chamber last voted on the issue in 1993

Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D- D.C., has introduced a bill that would make the District of Columbia the 51st state. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Eleanor Holmes Norton, the District of Columbia’s delegate to Congress, is hoping attitudes have changed in her own Democratic caucus about making Washington, D.C., a state.

She introduced a bill on Jan. 3 that would make the District the 51st state, entitled to a representative and two senators, and she now has 178 co-sponsors. But back in 1993, the last time the House voted on such a proposal — also put forward by Norton — 105 Democrats voted no, along with almost every Republican. The bill failed 153-277.