Executive Branch

GOP Health Care Bill Picks up ‘A Few’ Moderate Supporters
Vote on Friday possible if more support comes together

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., arrives for the meeting with President Donald Trump and the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House leadership secured the support of a few moderate holdouts for their health care bill during a late-night meeting Wednesday.

Those moderate’s votes would bring the bill closer to passage, but by how much remains unclear. If support comes together quickly, there could be a vote as soon as Friday.

Conservatives Ask Will ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ Show More Support for Border Wall?
House Freedom Caucus debates how to vote on spending bill

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, said the group  discussed Wednesday night how best to show support for President Donald Trump on the border wall (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

 

Can conservatives vote for a government spending bill that does not include funding for a border wall?

Senate Republicans Became More Bipartisan in the Last Congress — Democrats, Not So Much
Report places Sen. Bernie Sanders as the least bipartisan senator

Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, talk before a committee hearing. Collins was identified in a report as the most bipartisan senator of the 114th Congress. The report ranked Warren 88th. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats, once happy to rail against what they called obstructionist Republicans in the chamber, flipped positions with their friends across the aisle when it came to partisanship in the 114th Congress.

A new report from the Lugar Center and Georgetown University shows that most senators — almost two-thirds of the chamber — acted more bipartisan when it came to cosponsorships on bills during the most recent Congress, compared to the Congress before.

Senior WH Official: ‘Military Preparations’ Are Underway for N. Korea
U.S. soon will attempt to influence Kim via ‘economic dimension of national power’

A North Korean ballistic missile during a “Victory Day” parade in 2013. A senior Trump administration official on Wednesday alluded to “military preparations” underway to possibly confront the North. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)

The Trump administration is preparing a range of options — including plans for military operations — to deal with North Korea and its nuclear arms and missile programs.

National security officials are crafting possible diplomatic, economic and military responses to deal with the Hermit Kingdom, a senior administration official told reporters Wednesday at the White House.

Trump Tax Plan Sets Up Another Battle With Congress
President would lower corporate rate, slash individual brackets from 7 to 3

President Donald Trump delivers remarks in the State Dining Room at the White House on Monday. On Wednesday, he laid out his tax overhaul plan. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

The Trump administration on Wednesday rolled out a massive package of tax rate reductions and code changes. Senior officials claimed it will “pay for itself,” even though details remain murky and a fight with Congress lies ahead.

Luther Strange Gets First Primary Challenger
Suspended state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore enters Alabama Senate race

Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., will face a primary challenge from the state's suspended Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Roy Moore, the suspended Alabama Supreme Court chief justice, announced Wednesday that he’ll challenge Alabama Sen. Luther Strange in the Republican primary next year.

Moore, who was suspended in 2016 for telling probate judges not to follow federal orders on same-sex marriage, had previously been interviewed to replace Sen. Jeff Sessions after Sessions became U.S attorney general, but now-former Gov. Robert Bentley appointed Strange, the former state attorney general, to the seat, AL.com reported.

Three Celebrities on Capitol Hill for Three Reasons
Rob Thomas, Billy Hurley III and Huw Collins on why they came to D.C.

Athletes Billy Hurley III, left, and Dan Jansen, right, at a National Golf Day event in the Rayburn House Office Building. (Courtesy WE ARE GOLF)

This week on Capitol Hill, a musician, an athlete, and an actor came out to lobby for causes specifically important to them.

Singer Rob Thomas came to discuss the challenges facing songwriters and federal regulations on licensing and was joined by other singers including Peter Frampton.

Top Trump Aide on First 100 Days: ‘I Don’t Regret Anything’
White House busily selling first three months as productive, critics disagree

The North Lawn of the White House, the Washington Monument, and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, seen from the roof of the Hay Adams Hotel. President Trump is nearing his 100th day in office. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

A top Trump aide stopped shy of admitting the new administration has made mistakes, despite a turbulent three months as President Donald Trump nears his 100th day in office.

“I don’t regret anything,” a senior White House official told reporters Tuesday evening.

Nunes Gets Democratic Challenger
County prosecutor Andrew Janz criticizes Intelligence Committee chairman’s attempts to defend Trump

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., stepped aside from the investigation into possible Trump campaign ties to Russia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Devin Nunes of California received a Democratic challenger on Tuesday.

Fresno County Deputy District Attorney Andrew Janz criticized Nunes’ handling of the investigation of links between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russia to the Los Angeles Times.

Decision Day for Avoiding a Government Shutdown?
Appropriators think that decision on another stopgap bill could come today

Appropriations Committee member Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., a former chairman, says there are still some “knotty issues” to work out on a 2017 spending bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Appropriators think they are close to a deal to fund the government through September, but the hour is fast approaching where a stopgap might be needed to prevent a shutdown at midnight Friday.

Kentucky Rep. Harold Rogers, a former Appropriations chairman and still a senior member of the committee, described the leaders as, “within striking distance” on a fiscal 2017 spending bill.