Financial Regulation

EU to move first on crypto rules. Will US follow?
Podcast, Episode 135

Chris Brummer (right), a Georgetown Law professor and faculty director of the Institute of International Economic Law, talks to the CQ on Congress podcast host Shawn Zeller (left) at CQ Roll Call's studio  Jan. 8, 2019. (Photo by Nathan Ouellette/CQ Roll Call)

 

European officials are expected to fire the first shot in the regulation of cryptocurrencies, with recommendations on what should be done to protect investors and preserve the integrity of financial markets. 

Ep. 37: NAFTA, Consumer Regulations on Trump's Undo List
The Week Ahead

By Shawn Zeller and Ellyn Ferguson

President Donald Trump is likely to use executive orders to repeal Obama administration regulations and address long-standing concerns about the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, says CQ Roll Call's Trade reporter Ellyn Ferguson. Amit Narang, with the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen, talks about what his group and others will do to challenge Trump's orders, particularly ones involving financial regulations.

Ep. 36: Congress Set to Revoke Last-Minute Obama Regulations ... But There's a Risk
The Big Story

CQ Roll Call's Senate leadership reporter Niels Lesniewski walks us through how the GOP-controlled Congress can roll out the Congressional Review Act to rescind some of President Barack Obama’s last-minute regulations.

Show Notes:

Ep. 22: GOP Tries to Defang Agency That Fined Wells Fargo
The Big Story
US Looks to Clamp Down on Hezbollah Funding
Legislation authorizes sanctions on banks knowingly doing business with group

A Hezbollah rally in Beirut, Lebanon, in 2006. New legislation signed by President Barack Obama in December authorizes sanctions on financial institutions that knowingly do business with the organization. (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

In the long-running cat-and-mouse game between the U.S. government and Hezbollah, Washington is bringing to bear its latest tool to crack down on what American officials say is the Lebanese militant group’s globe-straddling illicit financing network.

The Obama administration’s newest instrument is the Hezbollah International Financing Prevention Act (PL 114-102), which authorizes U.S. sanctions on financial institutions that knowingly do business with Hezbollah or individuals acting on the group’s behalf.