Fred Upton

Trump wants to defund the arts. Will Republicans defy him for a third time?
‘Maybe I’m a sucker, but I don’t believe they were lying to us,‘ says ‘Rent’ star Anthony Rapp

“Barry” star Anthony Carrigan, here in 2018, was one of several actors on the Hill this week to lobby for NEA funding. (Emma McIntyre/Getty Images file photo)

Anthony Carrigan was a shy kid whose hair kept falling out. He had trouble making eye contact with others and wore hats to cover his bald spots. That’s because Carrigan suffers from a disease known as alopecia, which causes body hair to fall off in clumps. The disease was tremendously damaging to his fragile self-confidence. That is, until Carrigan began acting in a children’s community theatre.

“I was a pretty poor student,” says Carrigan, who now stars in HBO’s “Barry,” playing an affable Chechen gangster named NoHo Hank. “But once I found my love for acting and the arts, it made me a better student. It gave me more confidence. My social life became better. It affected me in such a drastic way across so many different arenas.”

House passes climate bill, with few Republican backers
The bill blocks funding for the Trump administration to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement

Rep. Adriano Espaillat, D-N.Y., takes a selfie with climate activists outside of the Capitol after the House passed the Climate Action Now resolution on Thursday, May 2, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House passed a bill Thursday to block funding for the Trump administration to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement and force the White House to share yearly plans of how it will meet its obligations under that deal.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., made the legislation a priority, and three Republicans joined Democrats in supporting the bill.

Bill making sure university presidents know about alleged sexual abuse introduced
The effort led by members from Michigan following scandal at Michigan State

Rep. Elissa Slotkin, D-Mich., is among the lead sponsors of the new legislation, known as the ALERT Act, which effectively mandates that university presidents cannot claim ignorance in Title IX cases. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There’s a new push for legislation to effectively mandate that university presidents cannot claim ignorance when allegations of sexual assault are made against their employees.

A bill being introduced in both the House and the Senate would require colleges and universities annually certify that top officials, including at least one trustee, have reviewed all of the sexual assault allegations if they want to keep getting federal funding.

House Republicans identify vulnerable members for 2020
NRCC announces initial eight members of Patriot Program

The NRCC has added New York Rep. Lee Zeldin to its Patriot Program for the 2020 cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Eight House Republicans, including the three from districts won by Hillary Clinton in 2016, have been named to the National Republican Congressional Committee’s list of incumbents expected to face tough re-elections. 

Members of the Patriot Program typically benefit from fundraising and organizational assistance. The list can be a signal to donors to direct checks to members in need.

Here are the 8 Republicans who broke with their party on Obamacare lawsuit
Democrats sought to put GOP colleagues on record with symbolic vote

Freshman Minnesota GOP Rep. Pete Stauber broke with his party on a vote related to the Obamacare lawsuit. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic congressional campaigns have already made health care an early focus of their 2020 messaging, and House Democrats bolstered that effort Wednesday with a symbolic vote that sought to once again put Republicans on record on the issue.

Eight Republicans sided with Democrats on the nonbinding resolution, which the House adopted, 240-186. The measure condemned the Trump administration’s support for invalidating the 2010 health care law in its entirety. The Department of Justice, in a new filing last week, backed a Texas judge’s decision to strike down the law. 

With clocks springing ahead, lawmakers want more sunshine
Florida senators lead effort for year-round daylight saving time as Markey touts 2005 expansion

Rick Scott and his fellow senator from Florida want to make daylight saving time a permanent thing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ahead of this weekend’s move to “spring ahead” the clocks, Florida lawmakers announced an effort to get rid of time changes altogether.

With the “Sunshine Protection Act,” Republican Sens. Marco Rubio and Rick Scott and Rep. Vern Buchanan want to make daylight saving time permanent, eliminating the switch back in the fall. Rubio introduced the same bill in the last Congress.

EMILY’s List names 2020 House and Senate targets
Pro-abortion rights group is targeting 43 House Republicans and six senators

EMILY’s List plans to target Minnesota GOP Rep. Pete Stauber in 2020, although he was not listed as an initial DCCC target. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

EMILY’s List is looking to expand the Democratic House majority and flip the Senate next year, naming 43 House Republicans and six GOP senators on its initial list of 2020 targets, shared first with Roll Call.

“EMILY’s List is actively recruiting and working with potential candidates in these flippable districts,” Stephanie Schriock, president of the pro-abortion rights group, said in a statement. “We look forward to sending even more pro-choice Democratic women to Congress next year to fight for health care, economic justice, and to end corruption.”

Key House votes in 2018: CQ Vote Studies
These 12 measures were the weightiest and most controversial of the year

Al Green, a Texas Democrat, offered an impeachment resolution highlighting Trump’s “bigoted statements.” The vote put some in his party in a tight spot. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The oldest of CQ’s annual studies, Key Votes is a selection of the major votes for both House and Senate for the past year. Editors choose the single vote on each issue that best presents a member’s stance or that determined the year’s legislative outcome. Charts of how each member voted on this list can be found at CQ.com.

Passage of a bill that would reauthorize for six years, through 2023, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which governs electronic surveillance of foreign terrorism suspects. Passed 256-164 (R 191-45; D 65-119) on Jan. 11, 2018.

Meet the lawmakers who didn’t stick to their parties’ position on guns
Eight Republicans and two Democrats crossed the aisle on Wednesday

New York Rep. Peter King voted for expanded background checks and has long been the lead Republican co-sponsor of the measure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With the help of eight Republicans, the Democratically-controlled House on Wednesday passed new gun safety legislation that would expand background checks.

And while the legislation isn’t likely to go anywhere in the Senate, it was a top priority for many new Democratic members who came to power last fall by making gun safety a salient campaign issue. An overwhelming majority of Americans support universal background checks.

Republicans from moderate districts bucking their party on background checks
Five Republicans have co-sponsored gun safety legislation hitting the floor on Wednesday

Pennsylvania Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick has signed onto legislation to expand background checks. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Wednesday’s House vote on legislation expanding background checks for gun sales is a top priority for a handful of Republicans from more moderate districts.

But while they’re largely in line with public opinion on the issue — and with the chamber’s new Democratic majority — they’re at odds with other Republicans in Congress.