Gene Green

Plan to Boost Coal and Nuclear Could Cost Consumers
Should consumers pay more so coal and nuclear plants can survive?

Energy Secretary Rick Perry testifies during the House Energy and Commerce Committee hearing Oct. 12. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

For years, federal regulation of the electric grid has focused on keeping prices low and competition stiff. But that could change with a recent proposal from the Trump administration to put more emphasis on what it calls resiliency.

According to Energy Secretary Rick Perry, the electric grid is more resilient — able to bounce back from disasters of the natural and man-made variety — when it has plenty of so-called baseload power that can run 24/7, with or without sunshine or wind and regardless of supply snags.

Gene Green Will Not Seek Re-Election
Democrat represents Texas’ 29th District

Rep. Gene Green, D-Texas. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Gene Green told his congressional staff Monday he will not run for re-election.

“I think that it is time for me to be more involved in the lives of our children and grandchildren,” the Texas Democrat said in a statement. “I have had to miss so many of their activities and after 26 years in Congress it is time to devote more time to my most important job of being a husband, father and grandfather.”

Word on the Hill: Schneider Rides the Bus
McCain’s award, Conaway’s life in D.C., McSally on sexism

Illinois Rep. Brad Schneider is getting on a commuter bus around 8 a.m. Tuesday to meet with constituents. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Brad Schneider, D-Ill., is taking his town hall on the road today.

He will use his “Commuter Town Hall” on the PACE bus in his suburban Chicago district to meet constituents during their work commutes.

House Begins Work on Over-the-Counter Drug Fees
FDA director: Consumers unprotected and manufacturers open to liability

(U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Scott Jackson)

The House began public deliberations Wednesday on a bill that would boost the Food and Drug Administration’s oversight of over-the-counter drugs in exchange for industry-paid fees.

A bipartisan draft bill released earlier this week has support from the FDA and the over-the-counter drug industry. Under the new proposal, drug manufacturers would pay an annual fee for their facilities and an extra fee each time they submit a request to review proposed changes related to their product.

Word on the Hill: Get Cultured in Rayburn
Yappy hour, and honoring the Mooch

A preview of the artwork from Asian-American artists on display in Rayburn today. (Courtesy Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation)

There are three different opportunities today to check out Asian-American artists and history in the Rayburn House Office Building.

The Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation is hosting an art exhibit “War and Refuge: Reflections on the Vietnamese Refugee Experience and Its Applicability to the Global Migration Crisis” from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the building’s foyer. The foundation works to educate people about the ideology, history, and legacy of communism in order to create “a world free from the false hope of communism.”

One Thing Congress Agrees On: Vaccines Work
They said lawmakers should support the use of vaccines

From left, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., chairman Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., at a HELP hearing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A bipartisan group of lawmakers are stressing the need to highlight benefits of vaccines amid reports of local outbreaks of infectious diseases.

“The science is clear: FDA-licensed vaccines are proven to be safe and effective, and save the lives both of those who receive them and vulnerable individuals around them,” the lawmakers wrote in a Tuesday letter sent to their colleagues. “As Members of Congress, we have a critical role to play in supporting the availability and use of vaccines to protect Americans from deadly diseases.”

Word on the Hill: Basketball and Politics
Two Illinois Democrats celebrate a birthday

Kareem Abdul-Jabaar spoke at the Democratic National Convention in July. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The NBA’s all-time leading scorer turned author and political activist, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, is speaking on African-American history in Washington today.

The former Los Angeles Lakers center, 69, is a Muslim convert and has been active in discussions about race and Islam. 

Word on the Hill: Debate Prep
McCaul and Van Hollen honored at Golden Toast

The Ballot Box Dozen. (Courtesy Georgetown Cupcake via Twitter)

In order to fully embrace debate season, OPI and Georgetown Cupcake have some treats for every political junkie out there.

In your preparation for Monday’s debate, check out nail polish company OPI’s Washington collection, which includes colors like ‘Madam President,’ ‘Squeaker of the House’ and ‘Pale to the Chief.’

Texas Democrats Do a Two-Step Over Voting Rights Victory
LBJ's daughter adds star power to delegation's event

Lynda Johnson Robb, left, seen in a 2014 photo with her husband, former Virginia Sen. Chuck Robb and Donna Brazile, joined in celebrations marking a court decision against Texas' voter ID law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

PHILADELPHIA — Texas Democrats did a victory lap Monday at their delegation’s “Texadelphia” kickoff event for the Democratic National Convention, celebrating a recent court victory that found the Lone Star State’s voter identification law discriminatory while paying tribute to their own political legacy.  

“He wanted you, all of you, to vote,” said Lynda Johnson Robb, the oldest daughter of President Lyndon Baines Johnson and a former first lady of Virginia. (She is married to former Gov. and Sen. Chuck Robb.)  

Why They Didn't Show Up to Sit In
The 11 Democrats who didn't participate in last week's gun control protest

Some 176 members of the House Democratic caucus – or 94 percent – took part in the sit-in last week to protest inaction on gun control legislation. (Courtesy Rep. John Yarmuth's Twitter page)

Organizers said they started last week’s extraordinary sit-in on the House floor without knowing how many other House Democrats would join them to demand votes on legislation to tighten background checks and prevent suspected terrorists from buying weapons. By the time the protest ended, nearly 26 hours later, 176 members of the caucus — or 94 percent — had taken part in the demonstration.  

[ Gun Control Meets Congressional Dysfunction ]