GOP women

Women Elected at Historic Levels, But No Surprise Here: White Men Dominate 116th Congress
Number of veterans down

A record number of women will be heading to Congress and there will be more minority lawmakers, but white men will still make up most of Congress. Above, supporters celebrate Jennifer Wexton's victory in Virginia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The 116th Congress is on track to be one of the most diverse in history, but the legislature will still be overwhelmingly white and male compared to the overall U.S. population. Historic numbers of women won seats in the midterm contests, but the number of veterans is likely to fall or stay flat. 

At least 96 women running for the House have won their races, shattering the previous record of 84 women in the House. Eighty-three of the women who won were Democrats.

At the Races: Is Lesko’s Win in the Desert a Mirage?
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Could a Blue Wave Sweep Away More GOP Women?
It’s not just members like Barbara Comstock who could be in trouble

Democrats are targeting some Republicans, like Indiana Rep. Jackie Walorski, even in Solid Republican races. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

WARSAW, Ind. — Jackie Walorski made the rounds at the Kosciusko County fish fry earlier this month like a political pro.

She took the time to sit down with veterans enjoying their fish, and she seemed to hug or clasp hands with everyone she encountered at this biannual Republican fundraiser.

New GOP Women’s Group Makes First Endorsements
Winning for Women announces staff, names Ayotte to board

Winning for Women is endorsing California Rep. Mimi Walters, left, and New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, right, among others. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic women outnumber Republican women in Congress 3-to-1. But a new group supporting conservative women is hoping to change that imbalance.

Winning for Women Inc. is making its first endorsements and announcing its key staff on Thursday. The initial round of endorsements, shared first with Roll Call, includes 12 women running for Senate or re-election to the House. 

Will 2018 Bring More Women to Congress?
Eleven women are leaving the House, three of whom are running for Senate

Arizona Rep. Martha McSally would add to the number of women leaving the House if she decides to jump into the Arizona Senate race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Women make up a fifth of Congress. Strategists from both parties would like to see that percentage increase in the 2018 midterms, but that’s no guarantee.

Eleven women have announced they’re leaving the House at the end of this term, including two Democrats and one Republican who are running for Senate. Arizona Rep. Martha McSally could make it a second Republican if she jumps into the open Arizona Senate race. Three female Democrats are among the top 10 most vulnerable senators.