gun control

Podcast: A Twist in the Gun Control Debate
CQ on Congress, Episode 92

Students, calling for Congress to act on gun control, demonstrate on the east lawn of the Capitol on February 21, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Avery Gardiner, co-president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, wants Congress to toughen background checks, but not if it also means shielding more gun sellers from liability lawsuits.

Show Notes:

House Cancels Votes for Billy Graham to Lie in Honor in Capitol Rotunda
Senate will remain in session Wednesday and Thursday

Hawaii Sen. Daniel K. Inouye lies in state on Dec. 20, 2012, on Capitol Hill. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House is shortening its Feb. 26 work week, canceling votes that Wednesday and Thursday, for the late Rev. Billy Graham to lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda.

“As is traditional, votes are no longer expected in the House on Wednesday, February 28, or Thursday, March 1,” House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s office announced. “Last votes next week will now occur during the evening hours of Tuesday, February 27.”

Capitol Ink | Gun Congress

Lawmakers Still Sending Thoughts and Prayers, Despite Criticism
Outcry over expressions of sympathy symptom of deadlock on guns

A small memorial near the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Wednesday, three days after a gunman killed more than two dozen people during a Sunday service. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Criticism of lawmakers who send “thoughts and prayers” to victims of mass shootings has attracted a lot of attention in the media. But it doesn’t appear to have caused many on Capitol Hill to find something else to say.

Roll Call reviewed statements by lawmakers after Sunday’s mass shooting during a church service in Sutherland Springs, Texas, which left 26 people, including an unborn child, dead, authorities said. The analysis found that dozens of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle reverted to some form of the expression, sparking an increasingly familiar backlash from gun control advocates and other critics who said the words have become meaningless in light of congressional inaction.

Trump: Stricter Gun Laws Not Needed After Texas Shooting
President says latest mass shooting is a ‘mental health problem at the highest level’

President Donald Trump, seen here addressing troops at Yokota Air Base on Sunday, said the U.S. and Japan “will not stand for” North Korea’s continued nuclear arms and long-range missile programs. (White House photo by Shealah Craighead/Flickr)

President Donald Trump signaled Monday he would not support legislation to stiffen gun laws after a 26-year-old man killed more than 20 people at a church in Texas on Sunday.

“Mental health is your problem here. This was a very … deranged individual,” the president said during a news conference in Tokyo with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. He said the shooter, Devin Patrick Kelley, had “a lot of problems over a long period of time.”

Reporter’s Notebook: Congress Could Be at a Standstill on Bump Stocks
 

Watch: Ryan Wonders How Bump Stocks Got Through Regulatory Process

Shortly after Reps. Seth Moulton and Carlos Curbelo introduced a bipartisan bill to ban the manufacture, sale and possession of bump stocks, Speaker Paul D. Ryan said his focus was on figuring out how the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives allowed for sale of these devices “in the first place.”

Congress Likely to Defer to Firearms Bureau on Bump Stock Ban
'There’s a big regulatory question,' Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Thursday

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., speaks at a news conference in Maryland on Thursday. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

CHESTERTOWN, Md. — Don’t expect Congress to take a quick vote banning bump stocks, the device that allowed the Las Vegas gunman to shoot his semi-automatic rifles at a rate resembling the rapid fire of a fully automatic weapon.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Thursday at a press conference here that he and many other lawmakers are just learning of the existence of bump stocks.  Congress first needs to examine how they are even allowed under current law, the Wisconsin Republican said, suggesting that a regulatory fix may be preferred over congressional action.

Capitol Ink | True Heroes

Capitol-Ink-10-03-17

One Dollar, One Name to Recognize Gun Violence Victims
Robin Kelly wants a vote on gun control legislation

Illinois Rep. Robin Kelly says pressure from the National Rifle Association is keeping House Republican leadership from allowing votes on gun violence. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Rep. Robin Kelly rose to speak on the House floor Thursday morning, she carried a list of 50 names — all victims of gun violence.

“I’ve begged — I’ve pleaded — I’ve screamed — I’ve cried and I even ground the people’s House to a halt with last year’s historic sit-in,” the Illinois Democrat said.