Gun legislation

Gun debate turns personal
Gillibrand highlights attack on former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speaking on the Senate floor Tuesday evening. (Graham MacGillivray/Roll Call Screenshot)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand was one of 24 Democrats who spoke on the Senate floor Tuesday night in a series of speeches calling for legislative action to prevent gun violence in the U.S. The New York senator’s speech focused on the personal stories of people she has met who have been impacted by gun violence across the country — at least until the last two minutes, when she directed her remarks at Republican Sen. Martha McSally of Arizona, who was taking her turn presiding over the chamber.

House Judiciary Committee sends gun control bills to the floor
Lengthy, contentious markup highlights how Republican opposition could stall effort in Senate

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., center, said the committee was "acting because of the urgent need to respond to the daily toll of gun violence in our communities." (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee advanced three more gun control bills Tuesday during a lengthy, often contentious and sometimes emotional markup that highlighted how Republican opposition could stall the efforts in the Senate.

The committee considered the legislation in the wake of an August in which 53 people were killed in mass shootings in the U.S., according to Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York. The shootings prompted a national address from President Donald Trump and intensified calls for Congress to act.

Background checks are still on the table for Trump, Chris Murphy says
Connecticut Democrat has doubts about a deal, calling the chances ‘less than 50/50’

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., is in talks with the White House on background check legislation for gun purchases. (Photo by Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Chris Murphy is working with the White House to keep alive conversations about a potential deal on expanded background checks for gun purchases.

The Connecticut Democrat said Friday he is willing to work with President Donald Trump because lives are at stake, but admits that he sees the chances of passing broad gun control legislation as “less than 50-50.”

Watch: Gun reform rally at Lafayette Square

An attendee holds up a sign participating in a rally to denounce hate and demand action after recent mass shootings at a shopping center in El Paso, Texas, and in a nightlife district in Dayton, Ohio, outside of the White House on Tuesday August 6, 2019. Photo by (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Downloadable Guns Would Pose Unique Risk to Capitol, Gainer Says
‘Even the most technologically advanced security cannot neutralize all possible threats,’ Ex-Senate sergeant-at-arms writes

Former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Terrance W. Gainer says not permanently stopping downloadable plastic guns “will increase the challenges of protecting the security of members of Congress, their staffs and visitors to the Capitol.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 3:26 p.m. | The only person to hold both top law enforcement roles at the Capitol says downloadable plastic guns would pose an added challenge of “detection and defense” for those who protect Capitol Hill.

Terrance W. Gainer, who served as Senate sergeant-at-arms for seven years and before that as the chief of the Capitol Police, said he is a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, but elected officials must recognize the “unique threat downloadable firearms pose to public safety.”