Gwen Moore

Eli Lilly chief executive escapes drug prices hearing
Diabetes advocates want to hear from CEO of U.S.-based company behind insulin price hikes

A woman hands an insulin pen to Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., during a 2017 town hall meeting on his health care legislation. (Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images file photo)

The chief executives of seven pharmaceutical companies will have to answer for the steep cost of medicines before a panel of senators on Tuesday.

The tableau of corporate heads raising their right hands to deliver sworn testimony about a growing public health crisis could recall scrutiny of the tobacco industry in Congress in the 1990s.

Primary care changes could be part of Senate effort to lower health care costs
A committee discussed ideas including provider incentives to buy drugs directly from wholesalers, and encouraging employers to offer on-site clinics

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Tina Smith, D-Minn., talk with attendees of the a Senate Health, Education Labor and Pensions Committee hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Sept. 25, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Tuesday highlighted changes to primary care coverage that could be part of a Senate effort to lower health care costs this year.

Those ideas include incentives for providers to buy drugs directly from wholesalers, expanding which services qualify for health savings account purchases, encouraging employers to offer on-site clinics to workers, and clarifying how direct primary care programs can help physicians reduce time spent on administrative tasks.

Azar touts rebate proposal as solution to 'broken' system
The proposal would create safe harbors under the anti-kickback statute for upfront discounts to patients and flat service fees to PBMs

Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar testifying at a hearing called "Prescription Drug Affordability and Innovation: Addressing Challenges in Today's Market" in front of the Senate Finance Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building Tuesday, June 26, 2018 (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar on Friday pitched a proposal he released the day before as a major step in reforming the complex system of the prescription drug supply chain and lowering prices.

The proposed rule released by HHS and the Office of the Inspector General Thursday would eliminate federal protections for manufacturer rebates paid to health plans and pharmacy benefit managers under federal health programs, although Azar expects the rule would also trigger changes in the commercial market. The proposal would instead create safe harbors under the anti-kickback statute for upfront discounts to patients and flat service fees to PBMs.

Democrats and Republicans clash over health care goals in Ways and Means
In between partisan comments, lawmakers mentioned health policies the panel could consider this year

Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., and ranking member Kevin Brady, R-Texas, talk during the House Ways and Means Committee organizational meeting for the 116th Congress on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Ways and Means Committee members hinted at health policy areas that could earn their attention this year during a Tuesday hearing on pre-existing conditions protections, but past disagreements will be difficult to move beyond if the meeting was any indication.

Essentially every committee Republican expressed support for guaranteeing coverage for people with pre-existing conditions and called on Congress to lower health care costs.

Gwen Moore announces she has cancer during hearing on pre-existing conditions
The announcement comes on day when House Democrats returned to discussions about pre-existing health conditions

Reps. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., right, and Gwen Moore, D-Wis., leave a meeting of the House Democratic Caucus in the Capitol on Jan. 4, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On a day when House Democrats returned to discussions about pre-existing health conditions, Rep. Gwen Moore, D-Wis., announced Tuesday she was diagnosed with small cell lymphocytic lymphoma in the spring of 2018. She said the disease is now in remission. 

Vote Mama helps moms with young children to run for office
New York’s Liuba Grechen Shirley launches PAC to support progressive candidates

Liuba Grechen Shirley, shown here with her children Mila, left, and Nicky, persuaded the Federal Election Commission to allow her to use campaign funds from her House campaign to pay for child care expenses. (Courtesy Liuba Grechen Shirley)

Liuba Grechen Shirley attracted national attention when she persuaded federal election officials to allow her to use money she raised for her 2018 congressional campaign to pay for babysitting expenses.

She still lost her 2018 House campaign. So did the six other women with children under 2 who ran for Congress last year, she said, in spite of what has been universally recognized as a watershed moment for women in politics.

South Florida official claims Rashida Tlaib might ‘blow up’ Capitol Hill
Democratic congresswoman has become lightning rod for conservative media and pro-Israel groups

Reps. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., right, and Gwen Moore, D-Wis., leave a meeting of the House Democratic Caucus in the Capitol on January 4. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A local official in South Florida accused Michigan Democratic Rep. Rashida Tlaib of being an anti-Semite who could try to "become a martyr and blow up Capitol Hill.

Annabelle Lima-Taub, a Hallandale Beach commissioner in Broward County, Florida, signed an online petition calling for Tlaib’s removal from office and posted it to her Facebook page.

Photos of the Week: Holidays and Bipawtisanship Edition
The week of Dec. 10 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree stands on the West Front of the Capitol on Dec. 10. The noble fir was harvested on November 2nd, from Willamette National Forest in Oregon. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

This week the Capitol Christmas Tree lit the night, a big tech guest heard questions from Congress (and InfoWars’ Alex Jones), and members celebrated bipawtisanship ... keep scrolling, you’ll get it.

The week of Dec. 10, 2018 in photos: 

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Meeks on Pence ‘laying low,’ the millennial caucus, and Reichert says leave investigations to the pros

Democratic Rep. Gwen Moore of Wisconsin gets a hug from Washington Democrat Dan Kildee at a House Financial Services Subcommittee on Monetary Policy and Trade hearing on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for it. We look, but we don’t find everything. We want to know what you see too.

Sexual Assault Survivors in Congress Call for Delay on Kavanaugh Vote
Five House Democrats ask for probe into all allegation against nominee

From left, Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, ranking member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., listen Thursday as Christine Blasey Ford testifies during a hearing on  the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/POOL)

Five Democratic lawmakers, each survivors of sexual assault and domestic abuse, are calling for a delay in the Senate vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

Reps. Alma Adams of North Carolina, Gwen Moore of Wisconsin, Ann McLane Kuster of New Hampshire, Jackie Speier of California and Debbie Dingell of Michigan penned a letter Thursday to President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell asking for the vote on Kavanaugh to be postponed and calling for an investigation into the additional allegations made against him in recent days.