house rules

3 Ways In Which the House Chaplain Controversy May Continue
Lawmakers still want answers about the speaker’s decision to fire Rev. Patrick J. Conroy

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy is staying is position but lawmakers are still questioning why he was asked to leave in the first place. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy is getting to stay in his position, but that doesn’t mean the controversy surrounding Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s initial decision to fire him is going away. 

Several lawmakers are still questioning what influenced the Wisconsin Republican to make his call and how to prevent future speakers from unilaterally seeking to remove the House chaplain. 

House Members Seek Rules Changes on Ousting Speaker, Moments of Silence
Rules Committee hears ideas from members as it considers changes for 115th Congress

One House rules change under consideration would target the process the House Freedom Caucus used to pressure former Speaker John Boehner to resign. (Bill Clark/Roll Call/Pool)

House members, frustrated by events such as conservatives' effort to oust former Speaker John A. Boehner and congressional inaction after multiple mass shootings, proposed changes to the Rules Committee Wednesday to prevent such scenarios from occurring in the 115th Congress. 

Wednesday's discussion on House rules that should be amended for the next Congress follows an April hearing on proposed changes to the appropriations process. Rules and Organization of the House Subcommittee Chairman Steve Stivers, R-Ohio, said that he may hold another hearing, but that at a minimum he plans to continue discussing ideas with his colleagues.

Quiz: All Fired Up About Gun Control
GOP blasts the opposition

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, right, and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy at a news conference at the RNC in May. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congressional Republicans are up in arms about the sit-ins , protests and floor fights that Democrats and like-minded activists have employed to spur action on tougher gun control laws.  

While a floor vote remains a long shot , the vitriol keeps flying.  

Why You Can't See the House Sit-In on C-SPAN
Live coverage on house floor is controlled by Republicans

Screenshot of C-SPAN during House sit-in.

The D.C. political world riveted its attention on a rare sit-in on the House floor Wednesday afternoon, but the closest C-SPAN's cameras could get to the action was the steps of the Capitol building.  

"House Cameras are not permitted to show sit-in," read a disclaimer notice at the bottom of the screen.