Human Services

House GOP is down to 13 women. Will North Carolina special elections boost their ranks?
Of the 27 Republicans running in 3rd or 9th districts, seven are women

Women listen to candidate Donald Trump at a 2016 rally in Raleigh, N.C. Seven GOP women are running in the North Carolina special elections this year. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

With two special elections in North Carolina this year, Republicans have a chance to send to Congress some company for West Virginia Rep. Carol Miller, the only female GOP lawmaker in the House freshman class.

The number of Republican women in the chamber is at a new low with just 13 in the 116th Congress, down from 23 the previous session. About 100 GOP women ran for the House in the 2018 cycle, but many of them struggled to get through primaries. 

Photos of the week: A budget, Marie Antoinette and St. Patrick’s Day
The week of March 11 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., holds a copy of the president's budget proposal during a news conference after the Senate policy luncheons on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration’s budget for fiscal year 2020 was released at the beginning of this week with little fanfare. And President Donald Trump attended the annual St. Patrick's Day reception on the Hill on Thursday. Lawmakers then headed out of town for their March recess next week.

Here's the entire week in Washington in photos:

Budget plan tries to create new fees, revive rejected ones

Copies of President Donald Trump’s budget for Fiscal Year 2020 run through the binding process at the Government Publishing Office in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration is proposing to raise about $60 billion over 10 years through new and expanded fees, including repeat proposals for eight fees rejected by appropriators last year.

The biggest of the bunch, by far, is a plan to raise $31.7 billion over 10 years by boosting the fees housing finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac charge to guarantee the mortgage market. The duo has been under federal conservatorship since 2008, when they required $187 billion in bailout funds to stay afloat.

Congress pressures immigration officials on sexual abuse allegations involving minors in custody
Senior officials at DHHS have taken offense at the use of the word ‘staff’ to describe predators

Cmdr. Jonathan D. White, U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, third from left, took offense at Rep. Ted Deutch’s description of employees who preyed on children in U.S. custody as "HHS staff." (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

UPDATE, 2 p.m.:  In an emailed statement, a spokesperson for HHS said officials have been “briefing Members on both sides of the aisle, in both the House of Representatives and Senate, on the allegations of sexual abuse and inappropriate sexual behavior.” The spokesperson did not name the lawmakers the agency met with.“HHS ... has communicated to Congressman Deutch that we will be happy to meet with him, once he corrects the hearing record from last week and provides an apology to the dedicated men and women working tirelessly to protect and improve the lives of unaccompanied alien children in our care,” she said.

Trump administration officials overseeing the sheltering of migrant children have refused to meet with some members of Congress about recent allegations that adult employees preyed on children in their custody.

Will FDA keep cracking down on teen vaping, other initiatives, after Gottlieb leaves?
Scott Gottlieb, fought teen vaping and approved record numbers of generic drugs will resign next month

The outside of the Food and Drug Administration headquarters is seen in White Oak, Md.(Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, who launched a campaign against teen vaping and approved a record number of generic drugs, is resigning next month.

The departure raises questions about whether the agency would continue to vigorously seek to curb the exploding use of e-cigarettes among young people, among other Gottlieb initiatives. But the commissioner, in a resignation letter listing accomplishments on this and other issues, said he was “confident that the FDA will continue to advance all these efforts.”

Teen who defied his mother to get vaccinated will testify before Congress
Before receiving immunizations, Lindenberger hadn’t received vaccination for MMR, chickenpox and Polio

Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn., prepares to recieve a small pox vaccination shot from RN Lucienne Nelson, with the National Institutes of Health, at the Department of Health and Human Services, Friday. (CQ Roll Call)

Ethan Lindenberger decided at the age of 18 to vaccinate himself despite his parent’s disapproval. On Tuesday, he will testify in front of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions at a hearing concerning the value of vaccines.

The Ohio resident garnered a great deal of media attention in recent months after he posted on Reddit asking how he could get the vaccines that usually are given during childhood.  Lindenberger’s parents refused to vaccinate him, because his mother believes in a now-debunked conspiracy theory that suggests the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine causes autism in children.

Key Senate votes in 2018: CQ Vote Studies
Kavanaugh, Yemen votes were flashpoints

The bitter and divisive confirmation process for Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh, shown here at this year’s State of the Union, reached a fever pitch when the full Senate voted on his appointment.(Doug Mills/Pool file photo)

The oldest of CQ’s annual studies, Key Votes is a selection of the major votes for both House and Senate for the past year. Editors choose the single vote on each issue that best presents a member’s stance or that determined the year’s legislative outcome. Charts of how each member voted on this list can be found at CQ.com.

Motion to invoke cloture to concur in the House amendment to the bill that would reauthorize for six years, through 2023, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which governs electronic surveillance of foreign terrorism suspects. Agreed to 60-38 (R 41-8; D 18-29; I 1-1) on Jan. 16, 2018.

Official distances HHS from sexual abuse of detained migrant children allegations
HHS official quibbled with description of contractors under HHS as "HHS staff"

A boy and father from Honduras are taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents near the U.S.-Mexico Border on June 12, 2018 near Mission, Texas. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

A Department of Health and Human Services official tried to distance his department from thousands of alleged sexual abuse cases of unaccompanied migrant children during intense questioning at a Tuesday hearing.

Rep. Ted Deutch grilled Commander Jonathan White about the abuse during a House Judiciary Committee hearing, but White emphasized the alleged perpetrators were contractors for the U.S. government, not staffers. White was the deputy at HHS under Secretary Alex Azar, who oversaw emergency efforts to return children separated from their parents at the border.

‘Medicare-for-all’ is no longer purely theoretical. Democrats are coming to terms with that
Support wobbles as Pramila Jayapal introduces new bill in the House

While there are fewer total co-sponsors than last year, the number of original co-sponsors for her universal health care bill is higher, Pramila Jayapal noted. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The single-payer “Medicare-for-all” bill that House Democrats are releasing Wednesday seems like it should stand a good chance of attracting more support than last year. After all, the House Democratic caucus ballooned this year and health care concerns were a key factor in the party’s electoral success.

But Rep. Pramila Jayapal of Washington, who will introduce the bill, said 107 House Democrats are initially supporting the measure. That number is fewer than the 124 Democrats who had formally backed an earlier version of the measure by the end of the last Congress.

Eli Lilly chief executive escapes drug prices hearing
Diabetes advocates want to hear from CEO of U.S.-based company behind insulin price hikes

A woman hands an insulin pen to Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., during a 2017 town hall meeting on his health care legislation. (Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images file photo)

The chief executives of seven pharmaceutical companies will have to answer for the steep cost of medicines before a panel of senators on Tuesday.

The tableau of corporate heads raising their right hands to deliver sworn testimony about a growing public health crisis could recall scrutiny of the tobacco industry in Congress in the 1990s.