illegal immigration

Meet the 10 Members of House Republicans’ DACA Task Force
Group holds varying immigration views, making road to compromise difficult

House Republicans want to ensure any legislation replacing the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, would have the support of the majority of their conference before it goes to the floor.

That’s why Speaker Paul D. Ryan formed a task force featuring a cross section of Republicans who serve on committees with jurisdiction over immigration and border security to come up with a plan the conference can support.

Ryan’s Immigration Task Force Searches for DACA Solution
 

Podcast: How the GOP Congress Could Help ‘Dreamers’ Now
The Big Story, Episode 70

Demonstrators outside the Trump International Hotel on Tuesday. President Donald Trump’s decision to rescind the DACA program could imperil GOP majorities in the House and Senate, Murphy writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Hill Republicans lambasted President Barack Obama’s deportation protections for 800,000 young people brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents, but now they sound willing to heed President Donald Trump’s invitation to turn the DACA program into law. What’s changed? CQ Roll Call immigration reporter Dean DeChiaro and education reporter Emily Wilkins explain.

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Ep. 46: Border Wall Design Begins and Guess Who Is Paying? Not Mexico.
The Week Ahead

Catch-up here on what is happening with President Donald Trump’s illegal immigration crackdown and plan to build a border wall, including its price tag. The project will involve taking private property and at least $15 billion taxpayer dollars, says CQ Roll Call’s national security reporter Gopal Ratnam. The wall was a cornerstone of Trump’s agenda, but some of his campaign promises on immigration have yet to be realized, adds immigration reporter Dean DeChiaro. @cqnow @rollcall

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Ep. 43: The Problems Facing Trump's Big Government Agenda
The Big Story

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Congress Caught Unaware by National Guard Report
Mitch McConnell says he will ‘take a look’ at any White House proposal

Border protection agents during a service at the Capitol in 2008. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congress was caught somewhat flat-footed Friday by reports that the Trump administration is considering calling on the National Guard to round up and deport undocumented immigrants. 

“I hadn’t heard about it,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said when asked about an Associated Press report on a memo drafted by the Department of Homeland Security. The document proposed mobilizing as many as 100,000 National Guard troops across 12 states to gather immigrants who were in the country illegally. AP reported that the memo, dated Jan. 25, bore the name of DHS Secretary John Kelly, and had circulated among DHS staff.

Trump Takes on Meryl Streep After Golden Globes Speech
And says getting border wall funds from Congress would speed project

Actress Meryl Streep used her Golden Globes acceptance speech for the Cecil B. DeMille Award to go off on the incoming president. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Donald Trump began the final full week before he will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by responding to actress Meryl Streep’s criticism with harsh words after her Golden Globes rant.

The Hollywood legend, a Hillary Clinton supporter, used a six-minute acceptance speech at the annual awards dinner to take umbrage with the president-elect’s campaign style and often-sharp rhetoric.

Ep. 35: Lawmakers Poised to Debate Immigration and Trump’s Wall
The Big Story

With Donald Trump in the White House, Republicans in Congress may finally have the momentum to change immigration policy that could spell trouble for more than 700,000 "Dreamers," children of undocumented immigrants who grew up in the U.S., say CQ Roll Call reporters Jonathan Miller and Dean DeChiaro.

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Supreme Court Won't Rehear Immigration Case
New term begins with eight justices trying to avoid tie votes

The Supreme Court starts its 2016-17 term with only eight justices. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 1:40 p.m. | The Supreme Court announced Monday that it won’t rehear a case that has stopped the Obama administration’s executive actions on immigration and affected millions of people who are living in the country illegally.

The justices deadlocked 4-4 last term, leaving in place a lower court order that halted implementation of the actions. The lower court had sided with Texas and 25 states, led mostly by Republican governors, that argued the administration had overstepped its authority with the immigration actions.