Jeff Flake

Opinion: The Big What-If Question Hovering Over 2018
What about Alabama? The president’s campaign is still under investigation

President Donald Trump holds a rally at Freedom Hall in Louisville, Ky., in March. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Election Night 2018:

TV Anchor (in an excited, making-history voice): “We now project that the Democrats have won the House of Representatives with a minimum of 219 seats and Nancy Pelosi will regain the speaker’s gavel after eight years in the minority.”

Flake’s Son Says He was ‘Terrified’ of Arpaio’s Prosecution
Senator’s son Austin testifies in malicious prosecution trial against sheriff

Former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio leaves U.S. District Court in Phoenix during his trial for disobeying a court order to stop traffic patrols that targeted immigrants in July. (Ross D. Franklin/AP file photo)

Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake’s son Austin testified Wednesday he was “terrified of what was going to come” as former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio pursued what he says were politically motivated charges against him.

Austin Flake said he lost faith in the criminal justice system due to Arpaio’s pursuit of an animal cruelty case against him and his ex-wife Logan Brown, AZ Central reported.

Arpaio ‘Seriously, Seriously, Seriously’ Considering Run for Flake’s Seat
Former sheriff and immigration lightning rod has teased runs for the Senate in the past

Former Maricopa County (Ariz.) Sheriff Joe Arpaio turned down the notion of running for Arizona Republican Rep. Trent Franks’ seat after Franks announced his resignation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Disgraced former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio says he has no interest in running for Rep. Trent Franks’ seat but is considering running for Arizona’s open Senate seat.

“I am seriously, seriously, seriously considering running for the U.S. Senate,” he told the Daily Beast. “Not the congressman’s seat.”

Photos of the Week: Three Resignations, a CR Extension and the Holidays Kick Off
The week of Dec. 4 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Ranking member Rep. Jerrold Nadler arrives Thursday for the House Judiciary Committee hearing on oversight of the FBI. Nadler became the top Democrat on the panel following Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr.’s resignation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 10:08 a.m.The week on the Hill was not short on news. Michigan Rep. John Conyers Jr. resigned amid allegations of sexual misconduct while Minnesota Sen. Al Franken, a fellow Democrat, announced he intended to do the same soon. Late Thursday, Republican Trent Franks from Arizona said he would resign effective Jan. 31 over sexual harassment allegations in his office.

At the same time, the funding deadline to keep the government open loomed. But a government shutdown was averted Thursday — at least for another two weeks — when both chambers passed a continuing resolution through Dec. 22. 

The Strange Day of Senate Farewells
Franken, Strange speeches were very different scenes

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and his wife Franni, leave the Capitol on December 7, 2017, after Franken announced on the Senate floor that he will resign his seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Thursday became departure day in the Senate, with back-to-back farewell speeches oddly linked due to the recent wave of allegations about sexual harassment.

Staffers and visitors, along with members of the media, filled the Senate chamber Thursday morning for Sen. Al Franken’s announcement that he would in fact resign his seat in the aftermath of an ever-increasing number of sexual harassment allegations.

Report: Arpaio Unable to Cite Evidence Against Flake’s Son
Comes after Flake's son filed malicious action suit

The son of Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., is involved with a lawsuit with former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was unable to cite any evidence while on the witness stand Wednesday in a malicious prosecution suit filed by the son of Sen. Jeff Flake.

Last month, Flake’s son Austin filed his suit against Arpaio, saying the sheriff pursued charges against him and his then-wife in 2014 for the deaths of 21 dogs at a kennel his in-laws managed.

Bannon a ‘Specialist’ in Picking Loser Senate Candidates, McConnell Says
Majority Leader said he expects Hatch decision soon

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell does not anticipate a wave of Senate GOP retirements. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 10:58 a.m. | Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he did not expect to lose any campaigns in 2018 because of fringe candidates who might have the backing of Breitbart’s Steve Bannon.

“We’re not going to lose any nominations to the kind of candidates that guy you were talking about endorsed,” McConnell said. “What he’s a specialist in is nominating people who lose.”

Bannon: Roy Moore Allegations Part of a ‘Setup’
Moore is facing allegations of sexual misconduct

Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore is welcomed to the stage by Steve Bannon as he introduces him during a campaign event Tuesday in Fairhope, Alabama. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Former White House adviser Steve Bannon returned to Alabama Tuesday night to support GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore, and suggested allegations of sexual misconduct were part of a media conspiracy to discredit Moore. 

“This whole thing was a setup. This whole thing was weaponized,” Bannon said at a rally in Fairhope, Alabama. “You know that. Folks down here in Alabama know that”

Flake Cuts Check for Doug Jones in Alabama Senate Race
Tweets ‘country over party’

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., arrives in the Capitol for the Senate Republicans lunch with President Donald Trump on Nov. 28. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Outgoing Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake tweeted a picture of a $100 check made out to Democratic Senate candidate Doug Jones’ campaign in Alabama.

Flake, who has frequently criticized Republican candidate Roy Moore, posted a picture of the check saying simply “Country over party.”

As Crunch Time Approaches, More Rumbling About Trump Behavior
Many members taken aback by a chaotic 48 hours last week

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters at the White House on Sept. 27. A recent 48-hour period last week, which was chaotic even by Trump's standards, has lawmakers newly concerned about his mindset. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

Several veteran Democratic lawmakers were flabbergasted last week by 48 hours that were among the wildest so far of Donald Trump’s presidency. And in private conversations, they say many of their Republican colleagues share similar concerns.

Trump appears to embrace a certain amount of chaos. After all, it generates media coverage — and the president is a voracious consumer of cable television and print news. But the 48 hours between last Tuesday and Thursday caused a spike in concerns among longtime Democratic members about Trump’s mindset and competence.