john boehner

Jones, Massie Take Aim at Perks for Former Speakers

Jones, left, and Massie hold a news conference about a bill they plan to introduce regarding  use of Capitol office space and staff provided to ex-speakers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Reps. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., and Thomas Massie, R-Ky., plan to introduce a bill Wednesday to eliminate a perk that allows former speakers to set up a government-funded office with as many as three aides.  

"I’m going out on a limb here, but I think if we could get this bill to the floor that every member of Congress would vote with us to eliminate this program," Massie said.  

Boehner Team in Place to Show Him the Money

Boehner during his final days in office. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Boehner Inc. begins.  

It took former Speaker John A. Boehner less than a week after leaving Congress to start assembling a team of power players to help him cash in.  

Boehner May Do More Than Golf After Congress

A man walks by Boehner's new Longworth office Monday. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 10:51 a.m. | Former Speaker John A. Boehner may have more than golf on his post-congressional to-do list.  

The Ohio Republican has hired Robert Barnett, a high-powered attorney with Williams & Connolly, who is best known for helping former government officials ink lucrative book deals and private-sector gigs. He helped Hillary Rodham Clinton negotiate publishing agreements such as the $8 million deal for her “Living History" memoir. Dave Schnittger, a former Boehner Hill aide now with the lobbying firm Squire Patton Boggs, confirmed Barnett's role. Schnittger also noted that former Boehner aide John Criscuolo will head up the ex-speaker's political affairs.  

Ryan Leaves Door Open to Policy Riders in Spending Bill

Ryan addresses the crowd after being sworn in on the House floor as the 54th speaker of the House on Oct. 29. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 3:35 p.m. | Speaker Paul D. Ryan won't rule out policy riders in the omnibus appropriations bill the House will consider in the weeks ahead.  

“This is the legislative branch, and the power of the purse rests within the legislative branch," the Wisconsin Republican said Tuesday at his first news conference as speaker, "and we fully expect that we're going to exercise that power."  

Taxpayers Foot Bill for Boehner's Post-Speaker Office

Boehner gets a standing ovation before his farewell address. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 6:10 p.m. | Looking for John A. Boehner? Try the Longworth House Office Building.  

The former House speaker, whose resignation from Congress became effective over the weekend, is taking advantage of little-known perks and privileges taxpayers provide by law to those vacating the chamber's highest office. Boehner is setting up a government-funded office that may have as many as three aides with salaries of more than $100,000 each.  

Ryan Beefs Up Speaker's Communications Team

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 4:00 p.m. | One of Paul D. Ryan’s plans for the speakership was to make up for less time spent on the road with more time spent communicating the GOP’s message. In a sign he plans to deliver on that pledge, the Wisconsin Republican announced Monday eight appointments to his communications staff.  

“This speakership is going to be about communicating a conservative vision and bold agenda for the American people, and I’m building a first-rate team to help me do the job,” Ryan said in a statement. Along with Brendan Buck, who was his communications director on Ways and Means and was already announced as chief communications adviser in the speaker’s office, the fresh crop of hires include four other staffers Ryan is bringing over from Ways and Means, three Boehner holdovers, and one former presidential campaign and Senate press aide.  

Boehner: 'God Had Another Plan' for Ryan

Ryan addresses the House. (Tom Williams, CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan said he took the job he didn't want, speaker of the House, out of an obligation to help unify a fractured Republican Conference.  

The Wisconsin lawmaker's immediate predecessor, John A. Boehner, said Sunday there was another compelling factor at play: God. "You have no choice, this isn't about what you want to do, this is about what God wants you to do, and God told me he wants you to do this," Boehner said he told Ryan a few weeks ago and recounted in an interview with CNN's Dana Bash that aired on the "State of the Union" program.  

Ryan: Immigration Overhaul Off the Table Under Obama

Boehner, foreground, and Ryan after the Oct. 29 speaker election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Newly elected Speaker Paul D. Ryan wants Republicans to spend the remainder of the 114th Congress offering major policy ideas, except on immigration.  

Ryan said on NBC's "Meet the Press" that President Barack Obama has shown he cannot be trusted on immigration policy because he tried to circumvent Congress and make changes to immigration laws by executive order. "The president's proven himself to be untrustworthy on this issue," Ryan said. "I think if we reach consensus on something like border enforcement, interior security, that's one thing. But I do not believe we should advance comprehensive immigration legislation with a president whose proven himself untrustworthy on this issue."  

Bigger Bucks, Better Office View Greet Paul Ryan

Nancy Pelosi and Ryan as he takes over as House speaker. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan woke up Friday for the first time as speaker of the House. Little may feel different to him yet, but at least five things have immediately changed for the Wisconsin Republican:  

The Line: As speaker, Ryan automatically joins the presidential line of succession. He could have been first in line if he and Mitt Romney had won the 2012 presidential election, but the former vice presidential candidate will have to settle for second in line. Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. is first.  

Boehner Ends Rocky Run as Speaker on a High Note

Boehner is going out on a productive week for his chamber. Above, he enters the room for his last weekly press conference on Tuesday. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

When the Nov. 3 deadline to raise the debt limit rolls around next week, John A. Boehner should be resting easy and enjoying  his new golf cart . Holding up a box of tissues before assuming the podium, Boehner stood before his colleagues Thursday to say goodbye.  

"I leave with no regrets or burdens," he said.