John Yarmuth

Trump, ‘Big Four’ Set to Meet Amid Shutdown Showdown
Huddle on year-end spending comes after last week's misfire

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other congressional leaders will meet with President Donald Trump one day before a shutdown showdown. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

More than two months into the fiscal year and with just days left before a temporary spending bill expires, congressional leaders and President Donald Trump are scheduled to sit down Thursday to discuss key spending issues.

The meeting comes a little more than a week after the two Democratic leaders, Charles E. Schumer in the Senate and Nancy Pelosi in the House, opted to skip a meeting on the same topic, after Trump tweeted that he didn’t see a deal happening. And it will occur a little more than a day before the current continuing resolution funding the government expires at the end of Dec. 8. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan went ahead without them to the White House last week. 

The Newspaperman
Members share memories of Ben Bradlee as HBO biopic premieres in D.C.

Ben Bradlee speaks during a question and answer session at the 30th anniversary screening of “All The President’s Men” in New York in 2005. (Brad Barket/Getty Images file photo)

HBO’s “The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee” premieres on the network Dec. 4. Some VIPs in D.C. got a sneak peak Wednesday.

Bradlee guided the paper as it peeled away the layers of the Watergate scandal, which toppled the presidency of Richard Nixon. Reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward told the story in their book “All the President’s Men,” later adapted for the film of the same name. 

Word on the Hill: Dine With the Presidents
Cummings sends off grads, and honoring veterans

“Dads of Democracy.” (Courtesy District Winery)

This weekend, why not eat with all the presidents watching you? District Winery’s new restaurant, Ana, has unique artwork in its dining area featuring 44 presidents.

Ana is located in Navy Yard on Water Street SE.

Diane Black, Prepping Gubernatorial Bid, Takes Victory Lap
Tennessee Republican finally shepherded budget resolution through House last week

House Budget Chairwoman Diane Black has had an undeniable impact on this year’s budget process, thanks to her efforts to forge a compromise package. (Tom Williams/Roll Call)

The first woman to chair the House Budget Committee finally shepherded the fiscal 2018 resolution through her chamber Oct. 5, a traditionally thankless task that she took on after President Donald Trump tapped the former chairman, Tom Price, to be secretary of Health and Human Services.

Rep. Diane Black is now preparing to hand in her gavel after 10 months on the job, so she can focus on her campaign to become Tennessee’s next Republican governor, she announced in early August.

House GOP Adopts Budget, One Step Closer to Tax Overhaul
Vote largely along party lines, with some Republican defections

Rep. Diane Black, chairman of the House Budget Committee, touted the fiscal 2018 budget resolution as a conservative tax and spending document that would allow a unified Republican government to work toward its campaign promises. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House adopted its fiscal 2018 budget resolution Thursday, five days after the fiscal year began Oct. 1.

The 219-206 vote, which moves Republicans one step closer to the reconciliation instructions they need to advance a tax bill through the Senate without Democratic support, was largely along party lines, although 18 Republicans defected and voted against the resolution. No Democrats voted for the GOP-drafted budget plan.

Budget Debate, Grievances Get Airing in Both Chambers

From left, Rep. Richard Neal, Sen. Ron Wyden, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer,  Rep. John Yarmuth, Rep. Barbara Lee, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, and Sen. Bernie Sanders conduct a news conference in the Capitol Wednesday to speak out against Republicans’ tax and budget plan that they say will benefit the wealthy. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Floor action on the fiscal 2018 budget resolution — made possible by assuaging conservatives’ concerns over the emerging tax overhaul blueprint last week — officially got under way on Wednesday.

The House voted 232-188 to approve parameters for debate and moved on to formally debating the resolution. Once the House and Senate formally adopt a joint budget resolution, if they can get that far, the tax-writing committees will be able to produce filibuster-proof tax legislation through the fast-track reconciliation process.

RSC Budget Allows Conservatives to Lay Down Austere Marker
Alternative will likely not pass, but gives conservatives an outlet

The Republican Study Committee, chaired by North Carolina Rep. Mark Walker, will get a House floor vote Thursday for its more austere budget. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Republicans will get the chance Thursday to vote for an alternative budget blueprint that offers up more than $10 trillion in spending cuts over a decade. The plan would double the number proposed in the House Budget Committee-approved fiscal 2018 resolution, while balancing the budget in half the time.

The conservative Republican Study Committee has been given assurances its alternative will be ruled in order for a vote when GOP leaders bring the fiscal 2018 budget resolution to the floor, according to an RSC aide.

Podcast: Lifting the Spending Caps
Budget Tracker Extra, Episode 31

House Budget Committee Chairwoman Diane Black, R-Tenn., and Ranking Member John Yarmuth, D-Ky., listen to testimony by OMB Director Mick Mulvaney during a committee hearing on May 24, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle would like to lift the spending limits established by law, says CQ budget reporter Jennifer Shutt, adding that it's just the latest budget issue to confront lawmakers along with passing a budget resolution and a tax overhaul.

 

Diane Black Will Need to Resign Budget Chairmanship or Seek Waiver
Tennessee Republican is running for governor

Tennessee Rep. Diane Black is running for governor and may have to give up her Budget Committee chairwomanship. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Diane Black may have to step down as Budget Committee chairwoman now that the Tennessee Republican is running for governor of her home state, but who will want to take the gavel of a panel whose primary work product has run into major roadblocks for two years in a row?

Black, the first woman to chair the Budget Committee, has only held the gavel for eight months. She replaced Tom Price, the Georgia Republican who was chairman for just two years before President Donald Trump tapped him to be his Health and Human Services secretary.

House Defeats Amendment to Cut One-Third of CBO Staff
‘It was CBO’s reluctance to change their erroneous forecasts’

Rep. Morgan Griffith, R-Va., offered the amendment that would have gotten rid of an 89-person CBO budget analysis division. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Wednesday night rejected, 116-309, an amendment that would have eliminated one-third of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The amendment, offered by Virginia Republican Morgan Griffith to the four-bill appropriations minibus the House is currently debating, would have abolished CBO’s 89-employee budget analysis division and saved a total of $15 million in salaries. Roughly half of Republicans joined Democrats in voting down the amendment.