Kevin Brady

Why the Speaker Race Won’t Fade Away Until November
Potential candidates lack a path to 218 votes and need time to build coalitions

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., is the front-runner to succeed retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., but there is a long way to go until the November elections. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans don’t know if they will be holding a speaker’s race or a contest for minority leader come November, but that isn’t stopping them from preparing for the former. 

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, the leading candidate to replace retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan, needs more time to build sufficient support to win a still-hypothetical speaker’s race. The same goes for other members eyeing the position.

Ryan Promises Vote This Year to Make Individual Tax Cuts Permanent
Hoyer suggests most Democrats would oppose such a measure if not offset

Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, right, and Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., leave a news conference in the House studio where they discussed the GOP’s tax law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Taxes were the talk of Congress Tuesday, the deadline for taxpayers to file returns for 2017, with Republicans messaging on the tax overhaul they passed last year and Speaker Paul D. Ryan promising a vote this year on a measure to make the individual tax cuts permanent.

“We fully intend to make these things permanent and that’s something we’ll be acting on later this year,” Ryan said of the individual tax rate reductions. Taxpayers will begin using the new rate structure in the 2018 filing season, but absent congressional action the individual rates will expire after 2025. 

Paul Ryan Intends to Serve Out Term as Speaker, Hints at Endorsing Potential Successor
'I have more thoughts on this ... and I'll share those thoughts later,' Ryan said on who should be next speaker

The House GOP leadership team, from left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., arrive for the House Republican Conference meeting in the basement of the Capitol as Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced he would not run for re-election, but would stay on as speaker until the end of the term. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan said he plans to remain speaker of the House through the end of the year when he plans to retire and indicated he will eventually endorse someone to succeed him.

“I have great confidence in this leadership team. That’s one thing that I’m really proud of,” Ryan said when asked who he thought should be the next speaker.

Ryan Won’t Run for Re-Election, Ready to Go Home to Family
Democrats say speaker’s retirement is a sign of things to come in November

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, D-Wis., arrives for his news conference on Wednesday to announce his retirement at the end of his current term. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced Wednesday he will not run for re-election and will leave Congress at the end of his term.

“This has been one of the two greatest honors of my life,” the speaker said. The other, he said, is his role as a husband and father, which he cited as his reason for leaving.

China Trade Tariffs Stir Support, Fears and Retaliation Threat
‘China is not afraid of and will not recoil from a trade war’

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photos)

Lawmakers offered mixed reactions to the Trump administration’s decision Thursday to apply tariffs on nearly 1,300 products imported to the United States, a move Beijing responded to by announcing that it may increase tariffs on $3 billion of American goods.

China’s Commerce Ministry called on Washington to reach a negotiated settlement  “as soon as possible” but gave no deadline, The Associated Press and other news agencies reported. It said its tentative measurers were in response to the tariffs announced March 8 on steel and aluminum imports.

No Snow Day on Capitol Hill Wednesday
Floor votes and hearings are still expected

A worker clears the sidewalks on the East Front of the Capitol in March 2009. Employees of the office of the Architect of the Capitol also will likely be hard at work to keep the Capitol open for business on Wednesday. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Executive agencies might close Wednesday for the snowstorm that’s bearing down on Washington, but it should be closer to business-as-usual on Capitol Hill.

The cold rain and expected changeover to snow is arriving when lawmakers are already safely in the nation’s capital, so the most usual reason to cancel business — flight delays — won’t be an issue.

'Phase Two' of Tax Cuts? What Is Trump Talking About?
GOP source: Lighthearted or not, president's idea is going nowhere

President Donald Trump greets mostly Republican members after addressing a joint session of Congress in February 2017 as House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady (clapping) looks on. Democrats were quick to exit the floor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A second Republican-crafted tax overhaul bill? In a highly competitive midterm election year? President Donald Trump keeps suggesting Republican lawmakers should do just that.

Trump and Republicans late last year relished his lone legislative feat, a tax bill that slashed rates while also opening new Arctic oil drilling and nixing Barack Obama’s individual health insurance requirement. He threw a celebration party with all congressional Republicans on the White House’s South Portico and insisted on signing the bill into law several days early in a hastily arranged Oval Office session.

In Shift, White House Embraces Art of the Possible
GOP source: ‘You’re just not going to pass legislation in 2018’

President Donald Trump speaks at Republicans’ retreat in West Virginia on Feb. 1 as Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise look on. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump and White House officials, with their modest response to school shootings and in other recent remarks, have shelved bold demands of Congress for asks rooted more in the art of the possible.

The president started 2018 by pushing members of both parties to swing for the fences on a sweeping immigration deal, even offering them political cover when he told them he would “take all the heat you want to give me.”

Ignoring GOP Pleas, Trump Sets Tariffs In Motion
Canada, Mexico initially exempt when import fees start March 23

President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference on Feb 23. His steel and aluminum tariffs will take effect March 23. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 4:22 p.m. | President Donald Trump on Thursday set in motion tariffs that will slap fees on many imports of steel and aluminum, moving ahead with a major part of his “America first” philosophy above the loud objections of Republican lawmakers.

“People are starting to realize how important it is,” Trump said just before signing in the Roosevelt Room. He said a “strong steel and aluminum industry” is “absolutely vital” for national security, predicting his action will trigger the reopening of American production facilities.

107 House Republicans Urge Trump To Narrow Tariff Proposal
Letter suggests steps that can be taken to 'minimize negative consequences'

Ways and Means Kevin Brady, R-Texas, led a letter of House Republicans urging the president to take steps to minimize negative consequences if he moves forward with his plan to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nearly half of the House Republican Conference sent a letter to President Donald Trump Wednesday expressing “deep concern” about his plan to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports and outlined steps he should take to minimize negative consequences.

Led by Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and Trade Subcommittee Chairman Dave Reichert, the letter reflects warnings that congressional Republicans have been communicating to Trump since he announced plans last week to impose a broadly applied 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports.