Louise M Slaughter

Jim McGovern Most Likely to Take Over for Slaughter on Rules Panel
Massachusetts Democrat to serve acting ranking member until Pelosi names successor

Ranking member Louise Slaughter and Massachusetts Rep. Jim McGovern confer before a House Rules hearing in the Capitol in July 2014. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After House Rules ranking member Louise Slaughter’s death, Rep. Jim McGovern will take over her committee post in an acting capacity, and remains the most likely candidate to succeed her. 

The Massachusetts Democrat was the second-highest-ranking Democrat on Rules behind Slaughter. McGovern’s seniority grants him the opportunity to serve as acting ranking member in her absence, as he did this week while she was in the hospital for a concussion. Slaughter, 88, the first woman to head the Rules panel, died Friday

Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, Through the Years, in Photos
The first chairwoman of the House Rules Committee is dead at 88

Rep. Louise M. Slaughter is dead at 88. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call 2015 file photo)

Rep. Louise M. Slaughterdied early Friday morning at age 88. The oldest member of Congress and first chairwoman of the powerful House Rules Committee leaves behind a legacy of three decades in Congress.

She fell at her home last week and suffered a concussion, according to her office.

Special Election Possible for Louise Slaughter’s Seat
Power to set the date of election lies with New York’s Democratic governor

It is not immediately clear if or when a special election for the seat of the late New York Rep. Louise M. Slaughter might take place. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A special election is possible to replace Rep. Louise Slaughter, who died Friday after suffering a concussion last week. New York state law gives Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo discretion over when to call such an election.

There is no set amount of time by which a governor has to announce a special election after the vacancy occurs. But once the governor does so, the election date must be between 70 and 80 days after the proclamation.

Louise Slaughter Dead at 88 After More Than Three Trailblazing Decades in Congress
New York Democrat fell and suffered concussion at D.C. residence last week

New York Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, who became the first chairwoman of the House Rules Committee in 2007, has died. In this July 2014 photo with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Slaughter and other members appear at a press conference following the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, the first woman to chair the House Rules Committee, died early Friday after falling at her Washington home last week. She was 88 years old.

Her office said the New York Democrat died at George Washington University Hospital, where she was being treated. The 16-term lawmaker was the oldest sitting member of Congress.

Rep. Louise Slaughter At Hospital Being Treated For a Concussion After Fall
Rules Committee ranking member did not suffer any fractures or broken bones, chief of staff says

Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., is in the hospital. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Louise Slaughter, ranking member of the House Rules Committee, is in the hospital being treated for a concussion after falling at her Washington residence last week.

“Congresswoman Slaughter fell at her Washington, D.C. residence last week and was taken to George Washington University Hospital to receive treatment and monitoring for a concussion,” Slaughter’s chief of staff Liam Fitzsimmons said in a statement first provided to Roll Call. “She did not suffer any fractures or broken bones and is receiving excellent care from the world-class medical staff at GW hospital.”

House Democrats Move Retreat to D.C.
Immigration and funding deadlines, 2018 messaging expected to be on agenda

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks at a press conference with female House Democrats in the Capitol on Jan. 21. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 10:30 p.m. | With a Thursday government funding deadline looming and negotiations ongoing, House Democrats decided late Tuesday to move their retreat scheduled for Wednesday through Friday from Cambridge, Maryland, to the Capitol complex.

“Given the pressing issues Congress will likely vote on over the next three days, House Democrats will hold their United for A Better Tomorrow Issues Conference at the U.S. Capitol,” Democratic Caucus spokeswoman Lauren French said. “Scheduling updates will be shared as soon as they are available.” 

Pyeongchang Send-Off: Members of Congress Share Their Excitement for Local Celebrities
States with several Olympians tout their accomplishments

U.S. athletes model the outfits they’ll wear in the opening ceremonies. (Courtesy of U.S. Ski & Snowboard Team on twitter)

As members of Team USA arrive in Pyeongchang, South Korea, for the Olympic Games, the White House is eyeing the hermit kingdom to the north. 

Vice President Mike Pence left for the games on Monday, with a few stops planned along the way. He’ll tour a ballistic missile defense facility, attend talks with Japanese leaders and otherwise “send a clear message of American resolve to the North Korean regime,” according to an aide.

Inside the House Republican Brain Drain
Record exodus by members who’ve wielded gavels will complicate next year

House Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce isn’t seeking re-election. He’s part of a record wave of departures by House chairmen. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

This has already become a wave election year, because a record wave of departures by House chairmen already guarantees a sea change in the Republican power structure next January.

Even if the GOP manages to hold on to its majority this fall, its policymaking muscle for the second half of President Donald Trump’s term will need some prolonged rehabilitation. And if the party gets swept back into the minority, its aptitude for stopping or co-opting the newly ascendant Democrats’ agenda will require some serious retraining.

A Huge Congressional Settlement Involving Sexual Harassment — And Hardly Anyone Knew
Lawmakers on Helsinki Commission blindsided by report of $220K payout

Florida Rep. Alcee L. Hastings has denied allegations of sexual misconduct that led to a $220,000 payment to a former congressional staffer. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The $220,000 paid to former staffer Winsome Packer in 2014 is by far the largest known settlement involving Congress and accusations of sexual harassment in recent years.

But few, if any, of the lawmakers who served on the congressional commission where Packer worked seem to have been informed about it until the sum was reported by Roll Call on Friday.  

Slaughter Outed as Not a Texan
The New York Democrat has for years had Texan Barton thinking she was one of them

Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., was born in Kentucky. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, D-N.Y., has, for years, kept Texas Rep. Joe L. Barton thinking she was from Texas.

In the late hours of Tuesday night, during a Rules Committee hearing the tax bill, the truth came out.