Luis V Gutierrez

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing Around the Capitol
Dogs on the Hill, Franken’s emotional speech, and who was most retweeted on the Hill

Immigration protesters, including Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., center, stand in  line after being arrested for staging a demonstration on the steps of the Capitol on Wednesday. Rep. Judy Chu was also arrested in the protest. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. And some of the best ones are those that we come across while reporting the big ones.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Gutiérrez Announces Retirement; Endorses Garcia to Succeed Him
‘I’d be a candidate, but I don’t have to be a candidate’

Illinois Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez will not seek re-election in 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Illinois Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez announced Tuesday he will not seek re-election in 2018.

He immediately threw his support behind Cook County Commissioner Jesús “Chuy” Garcia to succeed him in the 4th District.

New $44 Billion Disaster Aid Request Paltry, Lawmakers Say
Extensive offsets could also prove controversial

Rep. John Culberson of Texas said the White House’s most recent aid request “would sabotage what has been an incredible response by President Trump to Hurricane Harvey up to this point.” (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In its third emergency aid request since August, the White House on Friday asked Congress to approve $44 billion for ongoing hurricane recovery efforts, a figure seen as insufficient on both sides of the aisle. 

At the same time, the White House asked lawmakers to consider a lengthy list of offsets, noting in a letter that the administration “believes it is prudent to offset new spending.”

House-Passed Immigration Bills Have Murky Future in Senate
60-vote threshold puts passage in doubt

House Judiciary Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, left, and Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly arrive to address immigration legislation at a news conference in the Capitol on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A pair of enforcement bills targeting “sanctuary” cities and undocumented immigrants with prior deportations easily passed the House on Thursday, but they face an uphill climb in the Senate.

The bills are the first major pieces of immigration legislation taken up by the Republican-led Congress since President Donald Trump took office. Unlike former President Barack Obama, who had threatened to veto such measures, Trump has said he would sign both bills.

Trump, Tax Writers Find Doubts on Plan for Social Security IDs
Concerns over identity theft alarm even some Republicans

Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt is concerned about the proposals to expand the use of Social Security numbers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump and top congressional tax writers say they want to prevent undocumented workers from claiming tax breaks they aren’t entitled to by tightening up the standards, but a proposal to expand the use of Social Security numbers is finding resistance among lawmakers, including Republicans who are worried about identify theft.

Trump’s fiscal 2018 budget request would expand on language in the 1996 tax overhaul that required tax filers claiming the earned income tax credit to include a qualifying child’s name and Social Security number on the return. The administration said it would tighten the mandate to require such filers to also show they have the right to work.

Hispanic Caucus Members Turned Away From ICE Meeting
Numbers limited for bipartisan meeting, so lawmakers barred at door

Grisham was stunned that fellow members were turned away from the meeting. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats left a bipartisan meeting Thursday with the head of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement baffled — not just by what they heard but by the fact that some of their colleagues were not allowed to attend the meeting.

ICE Acting Director Thomas D. Homan met with a bipartisan group of House lawmakers for about an hour Thursday to discuss the agency’s recent raids that have led to the apprehension of at least 683 undocumented immigrants. That was the number ICE provided during the meeting, but Democrats contend the number is actually higher.

Trump Orders Taxpayer Funds to Pay For Border Wall
Democrats call Mexico reimbursement idea ‘a broken promise’

President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed two executive orders related to domestic security and to begin the process of building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

In a much-anticipated move, President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed a directive ordering federal funds to be diverted to begin building a massive wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

While Trump long promised during the presidential campaign to build a wall, he insisted Mexico would pay for it, and the decision to use taxpayer funds and later seek reimbursement from Mexico is a hugely contentious move.

Here Are the Democrats Skipping Trump’s Inauguration
Nearly 70 Democratic House members won’t attend Friday’s swearing-in

Virginia Rep. Gerald E. Connolly is one of the latest Democratic House members to say that he won’t attend Donald Trump’s inauguration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even before President-elect Donald Trump attacked Georgia Rep. John Lewis on Twitter over the weekend, a handful of Democratic lawmakers had planned to boycott Trump's inauguration on Friday.

But by the end of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday on Monday night, that group had ballooned. As of Friday morning, nearly 70 Democrats in the House said they will not attend out of protest. Several other House Democrats are not attending for medical or other reasons. No Democratic senators have announced intentions to boycott. 

Word on the Hill: The Mystery of Mulvaney’s Missing Desk
A senator hits the big 5-0, and giving blood, sweat, and tears … and blood

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, left, thought fellow South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy, right, might have hidden his desk. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., thought he might have been punked by one of his colleagues after his desk went missing while his office was being moved.

Mulvaney was moving offices as part of the relocating that takes place with a new Congress, but realized his desk wasn’t where it was supposed to be. He said members were told they didn’t have to pack the contents of their desks, so all of his stuff is missing, too.

At DNC, Those Most Affected by Trump's Wall Plan Speak Out
Gutierrez calls Trump policies 'sick, hateful fantasy'

Karla and Francisca Ortiz, of Las Vegas, speak on stage during the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The messages couldn't have been more different.  

Republicans chanted "build the wall" several times last week during their party's presidential convention in Cleveland last week.