Marc Veasey

Highlights From the Congressional Baseball Game
Winning Democrats elect to put trophy in Scalise’s office

Republican shortstop Rep. Ryan A. Costello of Pennsylvania dives for a ground ball during the second inning of the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park in Washington on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

After a tight first couple of innings, the Democratic team blew the game open on their way to an 11-2 win Thursday at the 56th annual Congressional Baseball Game.

The day after a gunman opened fire at the Republican team’s practice session, the winning Democrats elected to put the coveted Roll Call Trophy in the office of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was one of five wounded in Wednesday’s attack. News that he had come out of his third surgery in two days and that his condition was improving was released just before the game started.

Relievers Could Be Key in Congressional Baseball Game
Meehan, Aguilar enter game a year older

Pennsylvania Rep. Patrick Meehan celebrates after the Republicans’ 8-7 victory in the 55th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As a rule, once politicians get involved in the annual Congressional Baseball Game, they keep coming back for more.

And two veteran relief pitchers, Pennsylvania Republican Patrick Meehan and California Democrat Pete Aguilar, continue to get better every year.

Word on the Hill: Grammys on the Hill
Members performing with the pros tonight

Country music artist Keith Urban performs on Sunday during the 52nd Academy of Country Music Awards in Las Vegas. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

The annual Grammys on the Hill Awards will honor country music singer Keith Urban this evening.

Urban is the recipient of the Recording Artists’ Coalition Award for his music and work on music education programs. Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Tom Udall, D-N.M., will also be honored for their support of music programs and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Word on the Hill: Swearing In
Events surrounding the first day of the new Congress

Former Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, right, conducted a special swearing-in ceremony with Rep. Darin LaHood, R-Ill., in the Capitol in September. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Happy 2017 and welcome back!

Congress is in full force today with Senate and House swearing-in of the 115th Congress. Stay tuned for Roll Call’s coverage all day.

Heard on the Hill This Week: #HOHhalloween and Paul Ryan’s Musical Number
 

Roll Call’s Heard on the Hill reporter Alex Gangitano looks at politicians’ best Halloween costumes this year, from Sen. Ted Cruz as the Phantom of the Opera to former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney donning a Mitt Romney mask. And of course Rep. Marc Veasey, who went all out for his Halloween festivities at an amusement park in Texas, where he performed on stage as a Music Man-inspired zombie.

Also, hear a musical foray into the thoughts of Speaker Paul D. Ryan from “This American Life” and the songwriters of “Frozen,” performed by Neil Patrick Harris.

Veasey Goes to Work — as a Zombie
‘Marc Means Business’ initiative leads to Six Flags Fright Fest gig

Texas Rep. Marc Veasey in his zombie costume. (Rep. Marc Veasey via Instagram)

Over Halloween, many members took their children and grandchildren out trick-or-treating. Some dressed up in costume. Rep. Marc Veasey got a job as a zombie.

The Texas Democrat worked Friday night with the Six Flags Over Texas team during Fright Fest, a local tradition in Arlington, Texas.

Word on the Hill: Debate Prep
McCaul and Van Hollen honored at Golden Toast

The Ballot Box Dozen. (Courtesy Georgetown Cupcake via Twitter)

In order to fully embrace debate season, OPI and Georgetown Cupcake have some treats for every political junkie out there.

In your preparation for Monday’s debate, check out nail polish company OPI’s Washington collection, which includes colors like ‘Madam President,’ ‘Squeaker of the House’ and ‘Pale to the Chief.’

Some Survivors of the Fallen Are Shorted on Pentagon Benefits
Random payroll classification at date of death determines benefit payments

Sixty soldiers and non-commissioned officer Army Reservists are sworn in at the National Capitol Reenlistment Ceremony held in the Capitol Visitor Center in April 2009. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Every year, dozens of families that lose a breadwinner who is killed in the line of military duty receive hundreds of dollars less in their monthly Pentagon survivor benefit checks than other families, Roll Call has learned.

The unlucky families get less merely because the deceased soldier happened to fall into the wrong payroll category on the day of his or her death.

What Will It Take for Sanders Loyalists to Back Clinton?
Some diehard supporters, even in swing states, still say it's Bernie or Bust

Bernie Sanders delegates and supporters stage a walkout and protest at the media tents outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

PHILADELPHIA — At one of the many protests outside City Hall this week, Leisa Duncker sat in the blazing sun with a black Sharpie marker writing "Election Fraud" across her blue "Bernie Sanders" signs.   

Duncker is a Sanders supporter from Florida — a swing state — and she's voting for Green Party candidate Jill Stein in November.