Marcia L Fudge

Nancy Pelosi’s Leadership Lessons for Bossy Girls Everywhere
This week in Washington will matter much more than a TED Talk on how we beat down women who lead

Nancy Pelosi speaks to kids during Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day in April. Her current quest for the speaker’s gavel is a master class in getting things done, Murphy writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s hard to look away when Nancy Pelosi is whipping her caucus in a leadership race. It’s like watching a lion drag down an antelope twice its size or a slow-motion shark attack. Even though you think you know how it ends, the sheer power on display keeps you watching.

Take last week, after 16 Democrats announced that they would oppose Pelosi for speaker — just enough opposition to kill her bid. Within hours, her operation went about knocking the naysayers down one by one, along with Pelosi’s only announced challenger, Rep. Marcia Fudge, who dropped her bid after Pelosi re-started a dormant subcommittee on voting rights and put Fudge in charge of it. There are still murmurings of discontent in this corner or that, but the momentum seems to have shifted perceptibly to a second Pelosi speakership through a combination of Pelosi-sponsored sweeteners, tightening screws, and sheer force of will.

Another Democrat Who Signed Letter Opposing Pelosi Opens Door to Backing Her
Massachusetts’ Lynch says he would ‘obviously’ vote for Pelosi over a Republican

Rep. Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., is leaving open the door to vote for Nancy Pelosi as speaker. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic Rep. Stephen Lynch signed a letter earlier this month opposing Nancy Pelosi’s bid for speaker when Democrats take back the majority in January — but he has since left the door open to voting for her if no Democrat steps up to bat and challenges to the minority leader.

“If it becomes a choice between a Republican and Nancy Pelosi, I’ll obviously support Nancy Pelosi,” Lynch said in an interview with WCVB in Boston.

Pelosi Moves Closer to Speaker’s Gavel After Higgins’ Abrupt Reversal
N.Y. Democrat is promised action on infrastructure, Medicare legislation

Rep. Brian Higgins, D-N.Y., announced Wednesday he will support Rep. Nancy Pelosi’s bid to become speaker in January after the two struck a deal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In an abrupt reversal after signing on to a letter Monday opposing Nancy Pelosi’s bid for speaker, New York Rep. Brian Higgins announced he will support her after striking a deal with the California Democrat.

Higgins’ decision is a major blow to a group of House Democrats who want Pelosi to drop her pursuit of the speaker’s gavel so a new generation can emerge just as the party is returning to partial power in Washington. On Monday, Higgins was among 16 Democrats who signed a letter addressed to their colleagues, saying that the midterms showed voters “want to see real change in Washington” and that Democratic candidates “promised to change the status quo.”

Marcia Fudge Forgoes Speaker Bid, Will Support Pelosi
Pelosi intends to name Fudge chairwoman of a House Administration subcommittee on elections

Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, has declined to enter the speaker's race after securing concessions from Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Marcia Fudge has decided not to run for speaker and agreed to back Nancy Pelosi for the gavel after securing some concessions from the longtime Democratic leader. 

“My consideration was due in large part to the lack of sustained efforts that ensure diversity, equity and inclusion at all levels of the House,” the Ohio Democrat said in a statement, noting Pelosi has assured her that black women will have a seat at the decision-making table. 

Pelosi Rebel Seth Moulton Gets Pushback at Massachusetts Town Hall
Crowd at Amesbury event dotted with pro-Pelosi protesters

Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., heard from protesters who aren’t happy with his opposition to Nancy Pelosi’s speaker bid. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Seth Moulton, one of a handful of Democrats leading the crusade against House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s bid to reclaim the speaker’s gavel when Democrats take back the majority in January, caught heat at a town hall in his district on Monday.

“The majority of Americans want this change. The majority of Democrats want this change,” Moulton told constituents at a town hall in Amesbury, Massachusetts, to loud jeers of “No.”

16 Pelosi Opponents Sign Letter Saying They Won't Vote For Her for Speaker
Opposition could spell trouble for Pelosi in speaker election on the floor

Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., pictured speaking to reporters in the Capitol on November 15, 2018, is one of 16 Democrats who signed a letter saying they will not vote for Nancy Pelosi for speaker. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:53 p.m. | Sixteen Democrats have signed a letter released Monday saying they will vote against Nancy Pelosi for speaker.

While the opposition would appear to be more votes than the California Democrat can afford to lose in a floor vote, two of the signees — Ben McAdams of Utah and Anthony Brindisi of New York — are in races that have yet to be called. 

Speaker Races Are Usually Internal Affairs. Pelosi’s Is Anything But
Liberal groups pile on with endorsements

Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has some unlikely allies in her bid for speaker: outside influence groups. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, in her bumpy bid to reclaim the speaker’s gavel, has wooed endorsements from more than two dozen outside groups and labor unions, an atypical element of a debate usually held within the party’s inner sanctum.

The public show of support for the California Democrat makes clear the high stakes of the leadership slate for the incoming House majority and for the party’s off-the-Hill allies. MoveOn.org weighed in on Pelosi’s behalf on Thursday evening, as other progressive and liberal-leaning groups say privately their leaders are considering taking the unprecedented step of making an endorsement in a leadership contest.

Democrats Who Ran Anti-Pelosi Campaigns Show Signs of Cracking
Two in New Jersey, one in Michigan leave door open to supporting Pelosi after spurning her during campaign

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., conducts her weekly news conference in the Capitol Visitor Center on November 15, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Some of the newly elected Democratic House members who said on the campaign trail they would not support Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi for speaker have already shown signs of cracking as Pelosi ramps up the pressure for them not to divide the party before it even takes control of the chamber in January.

Rep.-elect Mikie Sherrill, a New Jersey Democrat who said during her campaign that the party needs “new leadership, and it starts at the top,” declined to affirm that statement after meeting with Pelosi on Friday.

Meeting With Pelosi Doesn’t Deter Marcia Fudge From Speaker Bid
‘No,’ Fudge said when asked if Pelosi asked her not to run

Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, walks into her Rayburn Building office after talking with reporters on Friday about her possible run for House speaker. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 4:00 p.m. | Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi met with her potential competition for the speaker’s gavel on Friday, Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge, who left the meeting still contemplating a bid.

“No,” Fudge told reporters when asked if Pelosi asked her not to run. “What she asked me was basically how we could get to a point where I could be supportive.”

Fudge to Make Speaker Bid Decision After Thanksgiving
Potential challenger seen heading into Pelosi’s office

Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, calls the convention to order at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Wednesday, July 27, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Marcia Fudge said she will make a decision on whether to run for speaker sometime after Thanksgiving.

The Ohio Democrat said she has not decided yet whether she would seek the Democratic Caucus’s nomination during leadership elections Nov. 28.