Mark Meadows

Senate Democrats Likely to Oppose Push to Block Health Insurance Mandate
Desire to keep contentious amendments off spending bills might prevail

Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., chairs the Appropriations subcommittee where any amendment on the D.C. health insurance mandate might come up first in the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A Republican amendment to a House-passed spending package that would ban the District of Columbia from implementing an individual health insurance coverage requirement is unlikely to gain steam as the Senate prepares to take up a similar measure.

It’s not clear yet if any Senate Republicans will introduce a similar amendment when the Financial Services and Interior-Environment package reaches the Senate floor, but it would likely face fierce minority opposition in the chamber, where Democrats are defending the 2010 health care law at every opportunity.

House Republicans Increase Messaging Votes Ahead of August Recess
GOP leaders prepare for break by seeking contrast with minority party

Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., sees value in some of the messaging votes the House will take up before the August recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House floor is seeing an uptick in messaging bills as Republicans prepare for a monthlong district work period in a midterm year when they are defending most of the seats in play.

Case in point was a resolution the House adopted Wednesday expressing support for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials and rejecting calls to abolish the agency — a stance some progressive Democrats are pushing.

Freedom Caucus Finds Silver Lining From Helsinki: At Least It Happened
“We support the fact that the president was there on the stage,” Rep. Warren Davidson says

Ohio Rep. Warren Davidson and other Freedom Caucus members defended President Donald Trump’s summit with Russian leader Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers and media personalities from both parties roundly criticized President Donald Trump’s performance at a joint press conference Monday with Russian President Vladimir Putin. But some House conservatives, who remained mostly silent immediately after that meeting, have managed to extract at least one silver lining from the Helsinki summit: At least there was one.

“The good news is there was a summit,” Rep. Warren Davidson of Ohio said Tuesday at a panel on Capitol Hill with other members of the hard-line conservative House Freedom Caucus.

Meadows, Jordan Ask DOJ to Investigate Rosenstein
Letter alleges Rosenstein threatened to subpoena Republican staffers’ communications

Reps. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., left, and Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, are asking the Department of Justice to investigate Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two Freedom Caucus Republicans asked the Justice Department’s inspector general Monday to investigate allegations that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein threatened to subpoena the email and phone records of House Intelligence Committee staff.

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows of North Carolina and caucus co-founder Jim Jordan of Ohio made the request in a letter to Inspector General Michael Horowitz, which alleges Rosenstein threatened the subpoenas in a tense January meeting about oversight requests from committee Republicans.

Republicans Put Immigration Divisions on Hold for ICE Messaging Votes
GOP members still want to vote on family reunification, agriculture guest worker program

Immigration has bedeviled Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Republicans, but they will push messaging votes on it either this week or next. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lacking a unified strategy on most immigration policy, Republicans are looking to temporarily set aside their differences and highlight an issue that has divided Democrats. 

GOP leaders are planning two votes this week or next related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which some Democrats say they want to abolish.

House Republicans Trust Jim Jordan Did Not Ignore Ohio State Sex Abuse
Colleagues come to Ohio Republican’s defense, calling him honest, honorable and trustworthy

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, has denied allegations he ignored sexual abuse while coaching wrestling at Ohio State University. House Republicans are defending him as honest and trustworthy. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Honest, honorable and trustworthy — these are all attributes House Republicans have ascribed to Rep. Jim Jordan as they’ve reacted skeptically to allegations that the Freedom Caucus founder ignored sexual abuse while an assistant wrestling coach at Ohio State University. 

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who like Jordan are considered potential candidates to replace retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan, were among those who defended the Ohio lawmaker. 

Ethics Experts Request Investigation Into Jordan in Ohio State Scandal
Comes as Freedom Caucus told to stand by their man

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, continues to face criticism about whether he knew about sexual abuse when he was an assistant wrestling coach at Ohio State University. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Obama administration ethics czar Norm Eisen has filed a request with the Office of Congressional Ethics for the House Ethics Committee to launch an inquiry into Rep. Jim Jordan.

Eisen, who is chairman of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, and Fred Wertheimer, president of Democracy 21, sent a letter to OCE on Monday asking it to investigate if Jordan is lying about whether he knew about sexual abuse while he was an assistant wrestling coach at The Ohio State University.

House Republicans Hope to Resuscitate Immigration Issue
July votes expected on family separation, and guest worker and E-Verify

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said GOP leaders will keep their promise for a July vote on an agriculture guest worker program and mandatory E-Verify and are also discussing legislation to address family separations at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans’ thorniest issue, immigration, is not going away after Wednesday’s embarrassing defeat of their “compromise” bill.

GOP leaders are planning votes in July on two more narrow bills that are also not guaranteed to pass. Some rank-and-file Republicans want to continue talks on a larger measure in hopes of finding an elusive path to passage. 

War Over FBI and Justice Reaches Crescendo on Hill
Divided House passes resolution demanding surveillance documents by July 6

The House passed a resolution by Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., aimed at the Justice Department on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Partisan clashes over the Justice Department and the FBI intensified Thursday as the House passed a resolution 226-183 demanding that Justice leaders turn over thousands of pages of investigative documents pertaining to the investigation of Carter Page and other former aides to President Donald Trump’s campaign. 

The House resolution insists that the Justice Department by July 6 comply with document requests and subpoenas issued by the Intelligence and Judiciary committees regarding potential violations of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act by department personnel during the FBI’s investigation of Russian influence in the 2016 presidential campaign.

Rosenstein, Wray in Hot Seat Over Clinton Investigation IG Report
Goodlatte rails against bias while Nadler says there’s no evidence of that

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein arrives in the Capitol for a meeting with a bipartisan group of lawmakers on the FBI Russia’s Russia investigation in May. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday renewed their grilling of Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray on the Department of Justice inspector general’s report on the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server.

The report released earlier this month found officials at the DOJ committed numerous mistakes and failures over the course of the 2016 investigation.