Mass shootings

Lawmakers Still Sending Thoughts and Prayers, Despite Criticism
Outcry over expressions of sympathy symptom of deadlock on guns

A small memorial near the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas, on Wednesday, three days after a gunman killed more than two dozen people during a Sunday service. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Criticism of lawmakers who send “thoughts and prayers” to victims of mass shootings has attracted a lot of attention in the media. But it doesn’t appear to have caused many on Capitol Hill to find something else to say.

Roll Call reviewed statements by lawmakers after Sunday’s mass shooting during a church service in Sutherland Springs, Texas, which left 26 people, including an unborn child, dead, authorities said. The analysis found that dozens of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle reverted to some form of the expression, sparking an increasingly familiar backlash from gun control advocates and other critics who said the words have become meaningless in light of congressional inaction.

Democrats Use CBO Report to Message Against Obamacare Repeal
Number of House Democrats skipping Trump’s inauguration continues to grow

Pelosi, right, and other Democrats are using a new CBO report to message against Republican plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats gained a useful messaging tool Tuesday in their efforts to thwart the GOP’s plan to dismantle the 2010 health care law, as the Congressional Budget Office released a report saying up to 32 million people would lose their insurance under a previous Republican proposal.

The CBO also estimated that marketplace premiums would nearly double under the GOP repeal legislation President Barack Obama vetoed last year. Republicans are using that prior budget reconciliation bill as a model for legislation they are drafting. Speaker Paul D. Ryan has said the new legislation will include some pieces of replacement policy as well. 

Gun Violence Takes Center Stage at Democratic Convention
Activists sense a sea change in momentum around the issue

Former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, seen here with her husband Mark Kelly, will address the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Tuesday night. (Bill Clark/ Roll Call)

PHILADELPHIA — Every couple of minutes, it seems to Daniel Hernandez, someone stops him to ask about gun violence.  

Hernandez is a former intern for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. He helped save the Arizona Democrat's life after she was shot in the head at a constituent event in 2011.  

Orlando Massacre Renews Gun Debates Already Raging in States
Bills in California and several other states expected to be closely watched on the Hill

Joshua Knight pays his respects to the Pulse nightclub shooting at a memorial in front the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts in Orlando. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The Orlando nightclub massacre is expected to bring renewed attention to debates over proposed gun safety measures already raging in California and a handful of other states.  

California lawmakers will vote today on a dozen bills that would tighten the state's gun restrictions, which are already among the toughest in the country. A Washington state measure that would allow judges to temporarily block people with violent tendencies from buying handguns is expected to appear on the ballot in November. And voters in Maine and Nebraska will vote on measures meant to close loopholes in background checks required for gun purchases.  

Republicans and Democrats Diverge After Orlando Attack
Lawmakers take different approaches to the shootings at gay nightclub

People stand in line at OneBlood Donation Center in Orlando on Sunday to donate blood for victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting. (Gerardo Mora/Getty Images)