Mike Pompeo

Corker and Hatch Won’t Be Moving Down Under
Senate GOP chairmen opt not to be considered for ambassador to Australia

Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker has turned down the chance to be ambassador to Australia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker will not be leaving the chamber to become ambassador to Australia, and neither will Finance Chairman Orrin G. Hatch.

An aide to Corker confirmed a report that the Tennessee Republican had been under consideration for the post.

Photos of the Week: Haspel Hearing (and Protests), Detainees Return and More
The week of May 7 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

The Service Year Alliance convened on the West Front of the Capitol on Monday in inflatable eagle costumes to call on Congress to expand funding in the 2019 budget for AmeriCorps, the Peace Corps and YouthBuild. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The focal point of the week of May 7 on Capitol Hill was the series of meetings that Gina Haspel had with senators, as well as the culminating confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee. Just outside of D.C. on Thursday morning, a scene played out on a tarmac — Secretary of State Mike Pompeoreturned with three American citizens who had been detained in North Korea, and the president was there to greet them.

Here’s the entire week in photos:

Trump Nuclear Summit With Kim Jong-Un Set for Singapore in June
Historic summit on denuclearization of Korean Peninsula set for June 12

Early Thursday morning President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump greeted freed American detainees from North Korea on the tarmac of Andrews Air Base May 10, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The plans are set for President Donald Trump to meet North Korean President Kim Jong-un in Singapore on June 12 for a historic meeting between the leaders of the two nations.

Trump announced the date and location of the summit via Twitter, saying that he and Kim “will both try to make it a very special moment for World Peace!”

Trump Meets Detainees from North Korea
Says Kim Jong Un wants to ‘bring that country into the real world’

President Donald Trump walks with the three Americans just released from North Korea  at Joint Base Andrews on Thursday after they arrived back in the U.S. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump welcomed three American detainees who were released from North Korea Thursday morning ahead of his summit with the country’s leader Kim Jong Un.

The president said Kim released the detainees in an effort to make North Korea welcome on the world state.

Analysis: Trump’s Iran Policy Unmoored From Facts
U.S. dropping out of 2015 multinational agreement

President Donald Trump’s White House speech on the Iran deal included some inaccurate statements and omissions of fact.  (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump announced Tuesday that the U.S. government would drop out of the 2015 multinational agreement limiting Iran’s nuclear activities. His White House speech included inaccurate statements and omissions of fact that reflect either misunderstanding of the accord or an effort to distort the historical record.

“At the heart of the Iran deal was a giant fiction, that a murderous regime desired only a peaceful nuclear energy program,” Trump said. Actually, it was the concern that Iran might be creating the ability to build weapons that led to the 2015 deal.

Trump Says Pompeo Secures Release of 3 American Detainees From North Korea
Scheduled to arrive back in U.S. early Thursday

President Donald Trump said that three Americans detained by North Korea are on their way home. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has secured the release of three American citizens detained in North Korea after meeting with that country's president, Kim Jong-Un, this week, President Donald Trump announced Wednesday.

Trump, who announced the detainees’ release via Twitter, will meet them and Pompeo at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland at 2 a.m. Thursday, he said.

If Not Gina Haspel, Then Who?
Opposition to career officer comes with risk of less palatable alternative

CIA Director nominee Gina Haspel has her confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

If not Gina Haspel, then who would be behind door No. 2?

Senate Democrats have concerns about Haspel, the CIA director nominee, ahead of her Wednesday confirmation hearing before the Intelligence Committee, but they might want to consider the potential alternatives.

Opinion: John McCain’s Empty Seat at the Gina Haspel Hearing
Perspective as a POW and torture victim would have helped clarify the debate

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., would have helped clarify the debate over whether Gina Haspel should be the nation’s next CIA director, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The second Republican presidential debate of the 2008 campaign season was held in Columbia, South Carolina — the conservative state where John McCain’s dreams of upending the George W. Bush juggernaut died in 2000. So when Brit Hume from Fox News asked McCain a question about waterboarding and other forms of torture, the prudent political strategy would have been to pander to GOP fears of terrorism.

But for McCain, the only presidential candidate to have ever been a prisoner of war, this was not an abstract topic. In 1968, after he refused early release from a Hanoi prison camp, McCain was so brutally beaten by his North Vietnamese captors that he was driven to the brink of suicide.

CIA Nominees Often Feel Like a ‘Dancing Bear’ in Capitol Circus

Gina Haspel, nominee to become CIA director, arrives for her meeting with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., in the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday, May 7, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One of President Bill Clinton’s nominees for CIA director, after months of repeated hearings and delays by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, dropped out, saying that he felt like a “dancing bear in a political circus.”

Another one of Clinton’s CIA nominees, a retired Air Force general, Michael P. C. Carnes, withdrew because of a scandal involving a Filipino servant he had brought to the United States.

Trump Hunkers Down On Haspel Nomination Ahead of Showdown
Pick to head CIA offered to withdraw nomination over the weekend to avoid controversy over torture program

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 05: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump crosses the South Lawn after arriving at the White House on May 5, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump traveled to Cleveland, Ohio to speak at Public Hall ahead of state primary elections. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump doubled down on his pick to head the Central Intelligence Agency, Gina Haspel, on Monday, even after she expressed concerns over her own nomination stemming from the use of torture tactics in a program she oversaw during the George W. Bush administration.

Haspel, the CIA’s deputy director whom Trump tapped in March to lead the agency, told White House staff she would withdraw her nomination if it would save herself and the CIA the embarrassment of a grilling in the Senate over the anti-terror program she headed, The Washington Post reported.