NASA

Former Senator, Astronaut John Glenn Hospitalized
The 95-year-old was one of the original ‘Mercury Seven’

Ohio Sen. John Glenn, during a press conference at NASA headquarters in downtown Washington in January 1998, to announce his return to the space program. Glenn, who served four terms in the Senate, has been hospitalized since last week. (Douglas Graham/Congressional Quarterly file photo)

Former Ohio Sen. John Glenn, best known for his exploits as an astronaut in the 1960s, has been hospitalized.

Glenn’s health has declined in recent years, and the last surviving member of NASA’s Project Mercury was losing his eyesight, and had undergone open heart surgery in 2014, Cleveland.com reported.

Aiming for Mars, Obama Announces Deep-Space Work With Industry
Outgoing president sees humans on Red Planet by 2030s

NASA's Opportunity rover explores an elongated crater called "Spirit of St. Louis" on Mars last year. President Obama on Monday announced his administration is working with private firms on deep-space technologies that could make human travel to Mars possible. (Photo via NASA)

To the Moon, Donald!
Trump web ad features spaceships, astronauts

The imagery in some Trump ads are curious, given that he's barely talked about the space program. (Donald J. Trump for President)

A new batch of Trump campaign advertisements featuring astronauts and spaceship launches has attracted attention from an advertising industry publication, which pointed out that Trump has never mentioned any substantial plans for the U.S. space program.  

The internet advertisements juxtapose portraits of Trump peering into the distance with the poorly blended NASA images and the slogan, "Aspire to greatness." They first appeared in July, shortly after the Trump campaign reportedly launched a massive increase in online ad spending.  

The Out of This World Legacy of Supernova Mikulski

Mikulski toured the Goddard Space Flight Center before a town hall with employees. (Rebecca Roth/NASA/Goddard)

GREENBELT, Md. — Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski spent Wednesday back on the campus where she watched as astronauts repair the Hubble Space Telescope more than two decades ago.  

"I was here for that first mission," recalled the Maryland Democrat who will retire at the end of this term of  Congress. "I went on so many Rolaids that day, I knew that I would never have acid reflux for 20 years."