National Institutes of Health

Analysis: Trump Takes the Budget Out of Budget Day
‘This is going to be awful,’ Mulvaney says of own budget briefing

President Donald Trump speaks earlier this month at a Republican retreat in West Virginia. He has yet to make a public pitch for his 2019 budget proposal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sometimes it’s what a president doesn’t say that reveals his true priorities. That certainly appears to be the case with Donald Trump’s second budget request.

The Trump administration is asking Congress to spend $4.4 trillion in taxpayer funds, but the president has shown little interest in selling the fiscal 2019 request. The chief executive had multiple opportunities Monday and Tuesday to speak into microphones and use his bully pulpit to advocate for the spending priorities. Instead, he focused on other matters.

Shutdown Begins After Midnight Deadline Passes
Senate has a vote on funding scheduled for 1 a.m. Friday

The latest government shutdown is the second in less than a month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s official: The federal government has entered yet another partial shutdown. 

The Senate reopened at 12:01 a.m. Friday after recessing just before 11 p.m. Thursday, as Sen. Rand Paul continued his objections to moving up the timetable for a procedural vote on legislation that would extend government funding past the midnight deadline. That vote is currently set for 1 a.m.

Budget Deal Facing Senate Slowdown, House Objections
Second shutdown in as many months looms larger

Congress continued to lurch toward another government shutdown on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 6:47 p.m.Confidence quickly waned Thursday afternoon that a massive $320 billion budget package with stopgap funding needed to avert a government shutdown at midnight would pass quickly as senators lodged procedural objections.

And if House Democratic leaders move from a passive vote-counting effort against the package to an aggressive one — neither chamber may have the time or the votes to pass the package before the current funding bill expires.

Senate Leaders Strike Budget Deal
Agreement between McConnell and Schumer may not yet have Pelosi support

The Senate’s leaders have reached an agreement on a longer-term budget agreement. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate leaders announced Wednesday the contours of a bipartisan deal to raise defense and nondefense spending by nearly $300 billion over the next two years.

The agreement, which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer announced on the chamber floor, would raise defense spending by $80 billion in the current fiscal year and more next year, and nondefense spending by $63 billion in fiscal 2018 and $68 billion in fiscal 2019.

Pelosi Withholding Support for Budget Deal, Wants Immigration Commitment
‘Without a commitment from Speaker Ryan … this package does not have my support’

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says she will not support a budget deal without a commitment to a floor debate on immigration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi announced Wednesday there is a budget agreement that reflects Democratic priorities but that she and her caucus cannot support it without a commitment from Speaker Paul D. Ryan to hold an open floor debate on immigration. 

“This morning, we took a measure of our Caucus because the package does nothing to advance bipartisan legislation to protect Dreamers in the House,” the California Democrat said in a statement. “Without a commitment from Speaker Ryan comparable to the commitment from Leader McConnell, this package does not have my support.”

Take Five: Roy Blunt
Missouri Republican says ‘the whole [legislative] process has been a pretty big disappointment’

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., hopes lawmakers stop focusing just on things they want to do and work as a whole. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Roy Blunt, 68, a Missouri Republican, talks about selfish lawmaking, his days as whip and why Harry S. Truman cleaned his desk out so quickly.

Q: You’ve been in Congress for a while. How is this Congress different than what you’ve seen before?

Another Year, Another Stopgap Likely Beyond Jan. 19
Even if they agree this week, lawmakers won’t be home free

Office of Budget and Management Director Mick Mulvaney will meet with congressional leaders on Wednesday to discuss the legislative agenda and the way forward on government spending. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Even if congressional leaders and top White House officials reach an agreement on new fiscal 2018 spending levels this week, lawmakers will still need to pass another temporary spending bill to keep the government open past Jan. 19.

Appropriators cannot rewrite all 12 appropriations bills and package them for floor votes before the third stopgap spending bill of fiscal 2018 expires in less than three weeks, aides in both parties said Tuesday.

House GOP Leaders Pushing for Stopgap Spending Bill
Securing last-minute votes may be needed

Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., predicts passage of a stopgap spending bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House GOP leaders are moving forward with a vote Thursday on a stopgap spending bill and a short-term extension of government surveillance powers lasting through Jan. 19, although they were working late Wednesday to secure some last-minute votes to pass it.

Several members of the House Freedom Caucus were withholding their support when leadership whipped the plan Wednesday evening.

McCain Back in Arizona Until January
Absence comes as GOP prepares for vote on tax bill

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., is seen in the senate subway before a vote in the Capitol on Dec. 6. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. John McCain returned to Arizona this weekend to receive therapy related to his cancer treatments as Republicans prepared a major vote for their tax overhaul bill.

A statement released Sunday from Dr. Mark Gilbert, chief of neuro-oncology at the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute, said McCain responded well to treatment he received for a viral infection.

Opinion: One Year Later — Why 21st Century Cures Still Matters
Help underway for diseases that impact virtually every family

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., left, and Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., hold thank you signs made by Max Schill, who’s diagnosed with Noonan Syndrome, a rare genetic condition, after the U.S. House of Representatives voted in favor of the 21st Century Cures Act on Capitol Hill in Washington in 2015. Upton and DeGette spearheaded the act. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)