Paul D Ryan

What to Watch in Tuesday’s Primaries
GOP picks nominee in top Senate race; 2 Toss-up House races will be set

Minnesota Sen. Tina Smith faces a DFL primary challenge Tuesday from five other candidates, including former Republican Richard Painter. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

From New England to the upper Midwest, four states are hosting primaries Tuesday.

The most interesting contests are in Wisconsin and Minnesota, which both hold primaries for Senate and for several competitive House seats. And in two safe Democratic districts — one in Minnesota and one in Connecticut — primaries will likely pick new members of Congress.

Fame and Campaign Fortune Haven’t Saved ‘Iron Stache’ From a Heated Primary
Randy Bryce faces fellow Democrat Cathy Myers in Wisconsin’s 1st District on Tuesday

Democrat Randy Bryce faces Cathy Myers in Tuesday’s primary in Wisconsin’s 1st District. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Randy Bryce came on to the political scene, he became a Democratic fundraising juggernaut. But the Wisconsin Democrat, who is known by his Twitter moniker “Iron Stache,” hasn’t locked down his primary race in the 1st District, despite a national profile and buckets of money being poured into his campaign.

Bryce faces a potentially competitive contest against Janesville school board member Cathy Myers in Tuesday’s primary. 

Snapshot: Chris Collins’ Finances Reviewed
Health technology and family ties a cornerstone in Collins’ wealth

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., has an investment portfolio heavy on health technology. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins surrendered to the FBI on Wednesday over criminal insider trading charges.

A review of the three-term congressman’s financial disclosures shows the extent of his personal wealth. Collins ranked 13th among House and Senate colleagues in the most recent Roll Call Wealth of Congress index, a ranking of reported assets and liabilities. 

Collins Paints Himself as Medical Patron, Won’t Drop Re-Election Bid
Defiant New York Republican says he’s not going anywhere as he fights insider trading charges

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., shown here on June 20, called a Wednesday evening press conference about his indictment and then delayed it several times. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Chris Collins announced Wednesday night he will stay in office and remain in his race for re-election, calling criminal insider trading charges filed against him earlier in the day “meritless.”

The New York Republican highlighted his long affiliation with Australian biotechnology company Innate Immunotherapeutics, saying he was the biggest investor and lost most of the money he invested when it failed a clinical drug trial to treat multiple sclerosis.

Speaker Ryan Strips Chris Collins of Committee Membership
Leadership move is not uncommon against scandal-plagued members

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., who was indicted Monday on securities fraud charges, attends a House Energy and Commerce Committee markup in Rayburn Building on June 28, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has removed Rep. Chris Collins from the House Energy and Commerce Committee, following Collins indictment Wednesday on charges of insider trading and lying to authorities.

“Insider trading is a clear violation of the public trust. Until this matter is settled, Rep. Collins will no longer be serving on the House Energy and Commerce Committee,” Ryan said in a statement.

Rep. Chris Collins Arrested for Insider Trading
Charges to three defendants also include wire fraud, conspiracy to commit wire fraud and making false statements

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins was arrested and indicted on charges related to securities fraud Wednesday.

The indictment is tied to securities of an Australian biotechnology company, Innate Immunotherapeutics where Collins has served on the board of directors.

Ohio’s 12th District Race Tightens in Final Stretch of Special Election
Republican Balderson is still favored, but Democrat O’Connor is closing the gap

Democrat Danny O’Connor is waging a surprisingly competitive race in Ohio’s ancestrally Republican 12th District. (Jonathan Quilter/The Columbus Dispatch via AP file photo)

The first week of August isn’t normally for politicking.

But all eyes are on the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio, for the next few days ahead of the last special election before the November midterms.

Ryan Discovers He’s Part Jewish, and More Congressional Root-Finders
The speaker will appear on the fifth season of ‘Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.’

PBS show traced Ryan back to his 10th great-grandfather. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Catholic Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan is a little bit Jewish.

Ryan taped an episode of the PBS series “Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates Jr.” and found that he’s 3 percent Ashkenazi Jewish, the Associated Press reported. He traced his heritage back to his 10th great-grandfather, who was born in Germany in 1531.

House Conservatives Could Tank a Quick Fall Spending Push
Pre-election passage could leave them without bargaining chips in lame-duck immigration fight, they fear

Republicans backing Jim Jordan for speaker may dig in against leadership appropriations strategy. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republican conservatives are mulling a plan to try to sink passage of a combined spending package for the Pentagon, education, health care and worker assistance programs before the elections.

They fear enactment of the Defense and Labor-HHS-Education measures — the two largest appropriations bills with the highest priority programs for Republicans and Democrats, respectively — would leave conservatives with little leverage in a lame-duck session fight over immigration and border security.

Speaker Race Could Hinge on Who Agrees to Change the Rules
House members have an ultimatum for those who covet the top spot: No changes, no gavel

Rep. Josh Gottheimer, D-N.J., is among the members demanding wholesale rules changes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Whichever party controls the House in 2019, the next speaker won’t secure the job easily and will likely have to promise major changes to how the institution operates, with members demanding that as a condition for support.

Frustration has grown among rank-and-file members for years as leadership usurped decision-making power from committees. Lawmakers have pushed to change House and caucus rules to return influence to individuals and committees, but with limited success.