political money

Mr. Hawkings’ Opus: 5 Reasons Why Congress Is Broken
 

Roll Call senior editor David Hawkings has been covering Congress for three decades, and he’s convinced that the legislative branch is more broken now than at any other point in his career. Here’s why.

Below is a transcript of the video.

Crowley’s Defeat Spotlights Rising Anti-Corporate Money Message
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is one of dozens of Democratic candidates rejecting corporate PAC money

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley lost his primary in New York’s 14th District on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez made rejecting corporate donations a centerpiece of her winning campaign to unseat a top House Democrat. But the message isn’t just resonating in liberal areas like New York City — it also worked for Conor Lamb

The Pennsylvania Democrat highlighted his pledge to reject corporate PAC money in his first television ad in the special election earlier this year, where he pulled off an upset in a district President Donald Trump carried by 20 points in 2016.

Campaign Finance Laws Poised for Rollback Under Trump
GOP expected to be aggressive in lifting regulations on parties

President-elect Donald Trump could find common ground with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in efforts to overhaul political money laws that seek to put ordinary Americans on more equal footing with megadonors (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As a candidate, President-elect Donald Trump railed against the political money system, saying it offers big donors outsized clout. But the changes he is likely to enable would roll back campaign finance regulations, allowing contributors to give even more.

The Republican’s victory in the presidential contest has given new hope to opponents of current donation limits and other restrictions, while it has jolted fear into those who want to overhaul political money laws to put ordinary Americans on more equal footing with megadonors.

Warren Urges Obama to Replace SEC Chairwoman
Agency chief shows 'brazen conduct' on political disclosure, senator says

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren wants Mary Jo White removed from her current SEC post over her inaction on pressing for new disclosure rules. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Elizabeth Warren took her long-running feud with the chairwoman of the Securities and Exchange Commission to a new level Friday, calling on President Barack Obama to remove Mary Jo White from the helm of the agency.

The Massachusetts Democrat said White's reluctance to press for new disclosure rules, including those that would compel public companies to reveal more about their political spending, was "undermining" the administration. Warren also called on Obama to pledge that he would veto any year-end spending measure that includes a block on such new rules.