Presidential race

Chris Collins Advocates Retribution for Recalcitrant Republicans
Trump ally says those voting against health plan should lose plum assignments, cash

Rep. Chris Collins has revenge on his mind if the House Freedom Caucus sinks the GOP health plan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

If House Freedom Caucus members sink the GOP leadership’s health care bill Thursday, they should be stripped of plum committee assignments and denied access to campaign committee resources, Rep. Chris Collins told reporters Wednesday.

“If this goes down, they’re not on our team,” the New York Republican said.

Opinion: James Comey and the Art of the Shiv
FBI director has the credibility to oppose the White House

In his testimony Monday, James B. Comey dropped enough bombshells to solidify his reputation as the most significant FBI director since J. Edgar Hoover, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Late in Monday’s marathon hearing of the House Intelligence Committee, FBI Director James Comey reminded the nation that he was something of a hostile witness, reluctantly summoned to talk about Russia, Donald Trump and the 2016 campaign.

“I’d rather not be talking about this at all,” Comey said. “Now we are going to close our mouths and do our work.”

McConnell and Paul Frame Outcome for GOP Health Care Overhaul
While majority leader rallies with Trump, Paul works against their plan

Sen. Rand Paul left Kentucky before President Donald Trump arrived to stump for the House Republican health care plan. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Over all the years that Mitch McConnell attended college basketball games at Freedom Hall, the Louisville alumnus probably never envisioned a scene like what played out Monday night.

The building was still a sea of red, but “Make America Great Again” hats had supplanted much of the Cardinals gear.

Looking for Clues From a 2005 Special Election in Ohio
Instead of comparing Democratic enthusiasm to tea party, go further back in time

Democrat Paul Hackett narrowly lost a special election in a heavily Republican district in Ohio in 2005. (Mike Simons/Getty Images file photo)

Are Democrats in the early stages of their own tea party movement? It’s one of the biggest outstanding questions at this point in the cycle. But as we collectively look at the past for prologue, I don’t understand why our memories only go back eight years.

There was a time, not too long ago, when Democrats were out of the White House and in the minority in both chambers of Congress, and a demoralizing presidential election loss helped jump-start a movement back to the majority.

Flashback Friday: Garland Heads to the Senate
One year later, a different nominee is up for confirmation

Garland, right, made his first visit with senators, including Reid, left, one year ago today. Republicans never granted the Supreme Court nominee a hearing. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

On St. Patrick’s Day in 2016, Supreme Court nominee Judge Merrick G. Garland made his first visit to the Senate. But the luck of the Irish wasn’t enough to move his nomination forward. One year later, a different judge is facing a confirmation hearing.

Garland, the chief judge for the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, made his way to the Senate one year ago today, the day after President Barack Obama nominated him to fill the vacancy left by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

House Intel Seeks Clarity From Comey on Wiretap Claims
Lawmakers want answers on investigation into Russian meddling, surveillence

Nunes, right, and Schiff, left, will hold a public hearing on the panel’s widespread investigation on Russia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Intelligence Committee members are looking for FBI Director James Comey to put an “exclamation point” on Monday to unfounded claims made by President Donald Trump alleging the Republican president was wiretapped by his Democratic predecessor.

The panel will hold its first public hearing on a widespread investigation into Russian meddling in the U.S. presidential election last year.

Senate Democrats Preview Their Case Against Gorsuch
Supreme Court nominee cast as foe of workers

Gorsuch is Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Democrats are preparing for next week’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing, and previewed their case Wednesday that Judge Neil Gorsuch’s rulings have favored corporations over individuals. 

“Judge Gorsuch may act like a neutral, calm judge,” said Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer. “But his record and his career clearly show he harbors a right wing, pro-corporate, special interest agenda.”

Trump and Snoop Dogg Have a History
President’s early morning tweet latest wrinkle in their relationship

Donald Trump and rapper Snoop Dogg in happier times. (Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images file photo)

Paul Ryan Returns to ‘Binary Choice’ Rhetoric
Speaker used same phrase to argue for Trump presidency

Ryan argues that the current GOP health care plan is a “binary choice,” echoing his arguments that Trump should be president. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is selling the Republicans’ health care bill the same way he did the presidential candidacy of Donald Trump. But on the health front, his pitch is falling flat with conservatives.

“Binary choice” is the phrase the Wisconsin Republican used during the presidential election to describe his reason for supporting Trump over Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. Ryan acknowledged throughout the campaign that both candidates were flawed but Trump was the better of two options, the only one who would help Republicans advance their legislative agenda.

Poll: Majority Says Sessions Should Resign for Lying Under Oath
And majority think illegal immigrants should stay

Majority of voters feel that Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, lied in his hearing before the Sente Judiciary Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A slight majority in a new poll say that Attorney General Jeff Sessions lied at his confirmation hearings and should resign.

The Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday found that 52 percent of the voters think Sessions lied under oath, and 51 percent feel he should resign, while 40 percent and 42 percent of respondents, respectively, felt the opposite.