Raja Krishnamoorthi

Members of Congress are rich with student debt
Reauthorization of Higher Education Act could affect repayment, affordability

68 members, or 13 percent of Congress, reported that either they or their family members have student loan debt. (Illustration by Chris Hale/CQ Roll Call)

As lawmakers look to reshape the federal loan process in the upcoming reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, a cohort knows firsthand the pain of rising college costs — 68 members, or 13 percent of Congress, reported that either they or their family members are mired in student debt.

Collectively, the 44 Democrats and 24 Republicans have higher education liabilities of $2.5 million, according to recent financial disclosures. The median student loan debt is $15,000, while average debt is $37,000.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on the prowl for Trump’s tax returns
New York Democrat grills president’s former personal lawyer about financial documents

From left, Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., listen to testimony by Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal attorney, at House Oversight and Reform Committee Wednesday.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez used her first marquee hearing appearance to help Democrats lay down legal ground work to pursue President Donald Trump’s tax returns.

The New York Democrat grilled the president’s former personal lawyer and “fixer,” Michael Cohen, on Wednesday on how Trump simultaneously inflated the value of his assets on financial statements in order to apply for substantial bank loans and deflated the value of those same assets in order to receive tax breaks.

Cohen implicates Trump’s sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, in mistress hush money scheme
Trump’s former lawyer and fixer was asked if he is aware of any other illegal acts that haven’t come to light

Michael Cohen, former attorney for President Donald Trump, testifies to the House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This is a developing story. Follow this page for updates on the latest from the Cohen hearing.

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, said Wednesday that Trump’s business operation is being investigated for illegal acts that haven’t yet been publicly disclosed.

Congressional leaders remember Parkland shooting anniversary
Lawmakers mark one year since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

Students and supporters protest against gun violence with a lie-in outside the White House in February last year, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers commemorated the victims of the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, on Thursday, one year to the date of the tragedy.

Seventeen people were killed and 14  wounded in the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14 last year. 

Democrats push back after AG says the Mueller probe is nearing its end
“It doesn’t jive with what I’m hearing,” California Rep. Karen Bass says

Matt Whitaker is the current acting attorney general. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

2018 in 5 Minutes: The Best of Congressional Hits and Misses
 

As the 115th Congress limps across the finish line with several unfinished spending bills and a partially shutdown federal government, Hits and Misses takes a look back at our favorite funny, awkward and downright bizarre moments from the House and Senate in 2018.

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Krishnamoorthi has a way to improve your day, Swalwell moved by a commercial and Norman’s poll

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for it. We look, but we don’t find everything. We want to know what you see, too.

Amid White House Crisis, Trump Turns to Kim Jong Un
Tweet touts North Korean leader’s ‘unwavering faith in President Trump’

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un participate in a signing ceremony during a meeting on June 12 in Singapore. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Updated 9:12 a.m. | With his White House again embroiled in a crisis and President Donald Trump wondering who he can trust, he touted the support of a new friend: North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

The New York Times on Wednesday afternoon published an op-ed by an anonymous “senior official in the Trump administration” that said Trump is “facing a test to his presidency unlike any faced by a modern American leader” in the form of officials across the government “working diligently from within to frustrate parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations.”

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
John Lewis Street, Krishnamoorthi nerds out on ‘Star Trek’ and a perfect morning in Cleveland

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Partisan Split Over Election Security Widens as 2018 Midterms Inch Closer
House given classified briefing on what DHS, FBI, DNI are doing to secure elections at state, local levels

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, and Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, left, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee address the media after a briefing on election security with House members in the Capitol Visitor Center on May 22, 2018. FBI Director Christopher Wray and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats also attended. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats and Republicans struck drastically different tones about their confidence in federal agencies’ efforts to secure voting systems and stamp out foreign state-sponsored influence campaigns ahead of the 2018 midterms after a classified meeting on the subject for House members Tuesday.

Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, and FBI Director Christopher Wray were among the officials who briefed lawmakers and answered their questions about what their agencies are doing to combat potential Russian, Iranian, Chinese, and other nations’ attempts to undermine the midterms.