Richard E Neal

‘I was never a fan of John McCain,’ Trump again goes after the late Senator
President makes clear he holds grudge over vote to repeal 2010 health law

From left: Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., Vice President Mike Pence, Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., President Donald Trump, and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., exit the Capitol after the annual Friends of Ireland Luncheon on March 14. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump is not backing down from his attacks on the late Sen. John McCain, on Tuesday saying he was “never” fond of the Arizona Republican.

On Sunday, Trump fired off a tweet with several inaccuracies criticizing McCain for his role in getting a dossier allegedly containing negative information about then-businessman Trump. He erroneously tweeted that McCain was “last in his class” at the U.S. Naval Academy.

Not green with envy: People who missed Friends of Ireland lunch

From left, Massachusetts Rep. Richard E. Neal, President Donald Trump, Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Speaker Nancy Pelosi follow Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger and House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving down the House steps after the annual Friends of Ireland luncheon on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Regardless of how you spend your St. Patrick’s Day, it’s not likely to be as awkward as the Friends of Ireland luncheon at the Capitol this year.

Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar found himself Thursday in close quarters with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Donald Trump, one day before the president vetoed a resolution Congress passed to terminate his national emergency declaration on the southern border. Amid all that, Trump found time to discuss Brexit, which the Irish are concerned will erect a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland. 

Photos of the week: A budget, Marie Antoinette and St. Patrick’s Day
The week of March 11 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., holds a copy of the president's budget proposal during a news conference after the Senate policy luncheons on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration’s budget for fiscal year 2020 was released at the beginning of this week with little fanfare. And President Donald Trump attended the annual St. Patrick's Day reception on the Hill on Thursday. Lawmakers then headed out of town for their March recess next week.

Here's the entire week in Washington in photos:

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on the prowl for Trump’s tax returns
New York Democrat grills president’s former personal lawyer about financial documents

From left, Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., listen to testimony by Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal attorney, at House Oversight and Reform Committee Wednesday.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez used her first marquee hearing appearance to help Democrats lay down legal ground work to pursue President Donald Trump’s tax returns.

The New York Democrat grilled the president’s former personal lawyer and “fixer,” Michael Cohen, on Wednesday on how Trump simultaneously inflated the value of his assets on financial statements in order to apply for substantial bank loans and deflated the value of those same assets in order to receive tax breaks.

Michael Cohen testimony: 5 things to watch for as Trump fixer spills to Congress
Former Trump lawyer will tell Oversight Committee Trump knew Roger Stone was dealing with WikiLeaks for DNC documents

House Oversight Chairman Elijah E. Cummings has said the testimony of former Donald Trump lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen “may very well be a turning point in our country’s history.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer, will testify before the House Committee on Oversight and Reform on Wednesday that his old boss is a “racist,” a “conman” and a “cheat.”

In what Chairman Elijah E. Cummings has told reporters “may very well be a turning point in our country’s history,” the president’s former fixer is expected to provide unprecedented insight into how Trump ran his business empire for more than a decade, details about two potentially illegal hush-money payouts to a Playboy model and an adult film actress during the 2016 presidential campaign, and the psyche and operational quirks of the most powerful man on earth.

House Democrats months away from demanding Trump tax returns
‘No wiggle room’ to deny request for Trump’s tax returns, expert says

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., walks up the House steps for a vote in the Capitol on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats on the House Ways and Means Committee said it would be months before they definitively try to obtain President Donald Trump’s tax returns, after a lengthy hearing Thursday to hear from tax and constitutional law experts.

“This is not the end. This is just the beginning,” Ways and Means Oversight Subcommittee Chairman John Lewis of Georgia said, making it clear there would be more hearings and examination of the sensitive matter.

Democrats and Republicans clash over health care goals in Ways and Means
In between partisan comments, lawmakers mentioned health policies the panel could consider this year

Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., and ranking member Kevin Brady, R-Texas, talk during the House Ways and Means Committee organizational meeting for the 116th Congress on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Ways and Means Committee members hinted at health policy areas that could earn their attention this year during a Tuesday hearing on pre-existing conditions protections, but past disagreements will be difficult to move beyond if the meeting was any indication.

Essentially every committee Republican expressed support for guaranteeing coverage for people with pre-existing conditions and called on Congress to lower health care costs.

Gwen Moore announces she has cancer during hearing on pre-existing conditions
The announcement comes on day when House Democrats returned to discussions about pre-existing health conditions

Reps. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., right, and Gwen Moore, D-Wis., leave a meeting of the House Democratic Caucus in the Capitol on Jan. 4, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On a day when House Democrats returned to discussions about pre-existing health conditions, Rep. Gwen Moore, D-Wis., announced Tuesday she was diagnosed with small cell lymphocytic lymphoma in the spring of 2018. She said the disease is now in remission. 

Photos of the Week: Federal workers protest, visit food drives and miss their second paycheck
The week of Jan. 21 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Chef José Andrés, right, and Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., take a tour on Tuesday of Andrés' World Central Kitchen, which is serving free meals and goods to federal workers who have been affected by the partial government shutdown in downtown Washington. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

From celebrity chefs preparing meals alongside the speaker, to protests, to canceled member retreats and a second missed paycheck for federal workers deemed essential — signs of the partial government shutdown are almost everywhere on Capitol Hill.

Here's the entire week in photos:

Coal industry fought black lung tax as disease rates rose
Coal companies and industry groups lobbied against extending a tax program that provides a lifeline for sufferers and their families

An overview of a coal prep plant outside the city of Welch in rural West Virginia on May 19, 2017, in Welch, West Virginia. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

While cases of black lung disease among miners were on the rise last year, coal companies and industry groups lobbied lawmakers against extending a tax program that provides a lifeline for sufferers and their families.

Mandatory disclosures show the coal lobby spent some of its influence money on discussions with lawmakers regarding the Black Lung Excise Tax and the trust fund that helps pay for the health and living benefits of sick coal workers whose employers have gone bankrupt, and their beneficiaries.