Richard E Neal

Photos of the Week: Jones Wins in Alabama, Tax Conference Gavels In
The week of Dec. 11 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi arrive for a news conference in the Capitol on Wednesday. They spoke out against the Republican tax plan ahead of the Senate-House conference committee meeting. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

GOP in Home Stretch on Tax Bill, Eyeing Senate Attendance

House Ways and Means chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, R-Texas, left, and ranking member Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., prepare for the Senate-House Conference Committee meeting on tax bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Tax Bill Set to Move at Warp Speed to Trump’s Desk
Some hurdles still remain, but Republicans feel confident they have the votes

House Ways and Means Chairman Rep. Kevin Brady, left, and ranking member Richard E. Neal prepare for the tax bill conference committee meeting Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Don’t blink, because you might miss Congress passing a historic overhaul of the U.S. tax code.

House and Senate Republicans say they are nearing completion on a sweeping bill that would dramatically reduce the corporate tax rate, lower the top individual tax rate, nearly double the standard deduction, bolster the child tax credit and remove some breaks enjoyed by many Americans.

As Tax Overhaul Looms, Senate Has Upper Hand
House GOP wary of Senate’s leverage given the narrow vote margin there

The Senate’s narrow margin on the tax overhaul provides it with some leverage in conference negotiations with the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate’s passage of a tax overhaul illustrated a fragile coalition of support that ironically provides the chamber with the upper hand headed into conference committee negotiations with the House.

House Republicans wanted a conference process on the two chambers’ differing tax bills to prevent the House from getting jammed by the Senate, as they acknowledge has happened frequently on major bills.

House Rules Committee Adopts Closed Rule for GOP Tax Bill
With last hurdle cleared, measure heads to the floor

House Rules Chairman Pete Sessions, center, and Washington Rep. Dan Newhouse, seen here with a staffer in March, joined six other Republicans Tuesday night to send the GOP tax bill to the floor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Republican tax bill cleared the Rules Committee late Tuesday night with no changes or amendments made in order for floor debate.

The panel adopted a closed rule in an 8-3 party-line vote, the last hurdle for the bill to clear before it reaches the floor.

GOP Leadership Confident on Votes for House Tax Bill, Brady Says
Both versions still violate Byrd rule by raising deficit after 10 years

From left, Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., ranking member, and Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., attend a House Ways and Means Committee markup. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady told reporters Monday changes could be made to the House tax overhaul bill before it reaches the floor Thursday but they would not be substantive.

“We don’t anticipate major changes,” Brady said of the possibility that Rules Committee would adopt an amendment to the bill when it meets Wednesday. “A lot of the work has been done.”

Podcast: What Businesses Have to Gain From the Tax Overhaul
The Week Ahead, Episode 78

Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, left, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., ranking member, conduct a House Ways and Means Committee markup of the Republicans' tax reform plan titled the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, in Longworth Building on November 9, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rachelle Bernstein of the National Retail Federation and a long time voice on tax policy around Capitol Hill explains what businesses, large and small, are looking for in the tax overhaul and the lessons learned from the Bush-era tax cuts.

Show Notes:

Photos of the Week: A House Tax Marathon as Senate Starts Action
The week of Nov. 6 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

From left, Rep. Sam Johnson, Chairman Kevin Brady and ranking member Richard Neal open a House Ways and Means Committee markup of the Republicans’ tax overhaul plan in Longworth Building on Monday. Rep. David Schweikert also appears. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Ways and Means Committee finished its marathon markup of the GOP tax overhaul plan Thursday, as attention shifted to the Senate, which will be marking up its own version of the bill next week. 

Here’s the entire week in photos:

Individual Mandate Repeal Likely Off Table for House Tax Bill

Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, left, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., ranking member, concluded their Ways and Means Committee markup of the Republicans' tax reform plan on November 9, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Repealing the individual mandate to buy health insurance, eyed by tax writers as a way to offset the costs of their tax overhaul legislation, does not appear to still be a candidate for inclusion in the House’s evolving measure. 

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady on Thursday suggested that repeal of the individual mandate will not make it into the tax overhaul the House plans to vote on next week.

House Panel Approves GOP Tax Measure
Chamber’s version differs markedly from Senate proposal

From left, House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, ranking member Richard E. Neal and California Rep. Mike Thompson attend a committee markup of House Republican tax bill on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House Ways and Means Committee on Thursday approved the Republican tax plan after making key changes such as raising repatriation tax rates on corporate cash held abroad, restoring the adoption child credit and changing the bill’s treatment of “pass-through” businesses.

Committee members voted along party lines, 24-16, to approve the legislation setting up a likely House floor vote next week. The substantive changes Thursday came in a so-called manager’s amendment from Chairman Kevin Brady who unveiled the package less than an hour before the panel took it up, prompting an outcry from Democrats.