Roger Wicker

Ratings Change: Franken Steps Down Amid Allegations, Seat Starts Likely Democratic
Minnesota Senator resigns after colleagues call for his exit

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., and his wife Franni, leave the Capitol on Thursday, after Franken announced on the Senate floor that he will resign his seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Al Franken’s resignation puts another Democratic seat into the 2018 mix, but it’s still unclear whether his departure provides Republicans with a legitimate takeover opportunity.

To handicap a race, it’s helpful to know where the contest will take place and who is running. In this case, we know the place is Minnesota, where, despite Donald Trump’s surge in the Midwest, Hillary Clinton narrowly prevailed in 2016, 46-45 percent, and where Republicans haven’t won a Senate race since Norm Coleman’s 2-point victory in 2002.

Roger Wicker Still Running, But Checking Right Flank
Former NRSC chairman could face primary foe who almost felled Thad Cochran

Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., says he is not contemplating retirement and will continue to run for re-election in 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Roger Wicker on Wednesday said he is not contemplating retirement and plans to run for re-election in 2018.

The Mississippi Republican and former chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee is said to be a top target of former White House adviser Steve Bannon, who is traveling the country trying to urge more far-right candidates to primary Senate GOP incumbents.

Word on the Hill: Football Season on the Hill
March for life, DREAMers rally and staffer shuffle

Arkansas Rep. Bruce Westerman of the Mean Machine, runs past the Guards’ Larry Bell for a first down during the eighth annual Congressional Football Game for Charity in 2015. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers who play in the Congressional Football Game for Charity got together for a reception at the Hall of States on Monday night, a week ahead of their big game.

The game takes place on Oct. 11 at 7 p.m. on the Hotchkiss Field at Gallaudet University (800 Florida Ave. NE).

Word on the Hill: Making D.C. History
Breakfast honoring service dog advocates, and #280Characters

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, right, shown here with D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, will receive an award from the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

What do Jose Andres and Eleanor Holmes Norton have in common? The nation’s capital.

The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., is presenting its Making D.C. History Awards tonight to them and other Washingtonians who have positively influenced the city.

Nine Thoughts After the Alabama Senate Runoff
Moore beat candidate supported by Trump, McConnell

Former Alabama supreme court justice Roy Moore won Tuesday’s Republican primary runoff. He is seeking to fill the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A year ago, the idea that Roy Moore, a former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice, would be elected to the U.S. Senate was absurd. But he took one giant step closer to that reality with a convincing victory over appointed-Sen. Luther Strange in Tuesday’s special election Republican primary runoff.

The recent result wasn’t a surprise, thanks to numerous public polls showing Moore with a commanding lead, but it’s still shocking to see a candidate supported by President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell go down to a significant defeat.

Senate GOP Shelves Vote on Latest Health Care Proposal

Sen. Bill Cassidy was pushing for a vote on a proposal to replace the current health insurance system this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate will not vote on a proposal to overhaul the 2010 health care law this week, senators said after Republicans hosted Vice President Mike Pence at their weekly closed-door lunches on Tuesday.

Consideration of the bill will be “postponed until we can get the votes,” Republican Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., said after the lunch.

GOP Primaries Could Hamper Plans on Taxes
Vulnerable Republican incumbents pose a challenge for McConnell

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange faces former Judge Roy Moore in a crucial Senate primary runoff next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republican hopes for moving an ambitious tax package in a closely divided Senate may hinge on a number of incumbents on the ballot, including Luther Strange of Alabama, who faces a tough primary runoff on Sept. 26.

The vulnerability of Republican incumbents like Strange underscores the challenges facing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as he tries to hold together at least 50 votes in his 52-member conference to pass a partisan tax plan under a filibuster-proof reconciliation bill.

Wicker Renews Call to Remove Confederate Emblem From Mississippi Flag
GOP senator condemns use of state flag as a ‘symbol of white supremacy’

Mississippi Republican Sen. Roger Wicker has reiterated his call to remove the Confederate battle emblem from his state’s flag. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In the wake of racial violence over the weekend in Virginia, Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi renewed his call Monday to remove the Confederate battle emblem from his state’s flag.

The Republican senator advocated the change in light of the fact that an altered version of the Mississippi flag was displayed Saturday during the neo-Nazi rally in the central Virginia city of Charlottesville, The (Jackson) Clarion-Ledger reported.

Enzi Plans September Budget Markup as McConnell Urges Speed

Chairman Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., takes his seat for the Senate Budget Committee to order for the hearing with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on the President’s budget proposals on Tuesday, June 13, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Budget Chairman Michael B. Enzi told Republicans Thursday he intends to mark up a fiscal 2018 budget resolution in September.

In addition, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., met with Republicans on the Budget Committee late Thursday morning and charged them with producing a budget resolution after the recess.

Conservatives Plot Payback for Obamacare Repeal Failure
Outside groups warn that Republicans could lose control of Congress

A man holds a sign during an anti-health care overhaul rally in 2010. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With the effort to repeal the 2010 health care law on the brink of failure, conservatives are warning that the Republican base will abandon the party. And some are already turning on GOP senators holding up the process.

Three GOP senators have said they would not support moving forward with an effort to repeal much of President Barack Obama’s signature health care law, which would be enough to block the effort. Conservatives, livid with lawmakers reneging on a seven-year promise to undo the law, say not fulfilling that pledge threatens the GOP majorities in Congress.