Senate

Conservatives Ask Will ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ Show More Support for Border Wall?
House Freedom Caucus debates how to vote on spending bill

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, said the group  discussed Wednesday night how best to show support for President Donald Trump on the border wall (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

 

Can conservatives vote for a government spending bill that does not include funding for a border wall?

Democrats Make Campaign Issue out of GOP Health Care Proposal
Three Democratic groups launched digital ads Wednesday

Democrats have launched digital ads attacking House Republicans, including New Jersey Rep. Tom MacArthur, who’s behind the latest health care proposal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As soon as House Republicans started talking about another vote on a revised health care plan, Democrats began sharpening their knives.

Both Democratic campaign committees and Priorities USA Action, a major Democratic super PAC, released digital ads Wednesday that accuse Republicans of stripping coverage for Americans with preexisting conditions while exempting themselves.

Inside Elections: What You Need to Know About the Gubernatorial Landscape

While most of Washington’s focus is on the 2018 midterms, 38 states are also having gubernatorial elections in the next two years. Roll Call Election Analyst Nathan L. Gonzales takes a look at key governor races and how their outcomes could effect the balance of power in Congress. Virginia and New Jersey will both select governors in 2017, the rest of the elections happen in 2018.

Senate Republicans Became More Bipartisan in the Last Congress — Democrats, Not So Much
Report places Sen. Bernie Sanders as the least bipartisan senator

Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, talk before a committee hearing. Collins was identified in a report as the most bipartisan senator of the 114th Congress. The report ranked Warren 88th. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats, once happy to rail against what they called obstructionist Republicans in the chamber, flipped positions with their friends across the aisle when it came to partisanship in the 114th Congress.

A new report from the Lugar Center and Georgetown University shows that most senators — almost two-thirds of the chamber — acted more bipartisan when it came to cosponsorships on bills during the most recent Congress, compared to the Congress before.

Senior WH Official: ‘Military Preparations’ Are Underway for N. Korea
U.S. soon will attempt to influence Kim via ‘economic dimension of national power’

A North Korean ballistic missile during a “Victory Day” parade in 2013. A senior Trump administration official on Wednesday alluded to “military preparations” underway to possibly confront the North. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)

The Trump administration is preparing a range of options — including plans for military operations — to deal with North Korea and its nuclear arms and missile programs.

National security officials are crafting possible diplomatic, economic and military responses to deal with the Hermit Kingdom, a senior administration official told reporters Wednesday at the White House.

Trump Tax Plan Sets Up Another Battle With Congress
President would lower corporate rate, slash individual brackets from 7 to 3

President Donald Trump delivers remarks in the State Dining Room at the White House on Monday. On Wednesday, he laid out his tax overhaul plan. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

By JOHN T. BENNETT and LINDSEY McPHERSON, CQ Roll Call

The Trump administration on Wednesday rolled out a massive package of tax rate reductions and code changes. Senior officials claimed it will “pay for itself,” even though details remain murky and a fight with Congress lies ahead.

Luther Strange Gets First Primary Challenger
Suspended state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore enters Alabama Senate race

Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., will face a primary challenge from the state's suspended Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Roy Moore, the suspended Alabama Supreme Court chief justice, announced Wednesday that he’ll challenge Alabama Sen. Luther Strange in the Republican primary next year.

Moore, who was suspended in 2016 for telling probate judges not to follow federal orders on same-sex marriage, had previously been interviewed to replace Sen. Jeff Sessions after Sessions became U.S attorney general, but now-former Gov. Robert Bentley appointed Strange, the former state attorney general, to the seat, AL.com reported.

Top Trump Aide on First 100 Days: ‘I Don’t Regret Anything’
White House busily selling first three months as productive, critics disagree

The North Lawn of the White House, the Washington Monument, and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, seen from the roof of the Hay Adams Hotel. President Trump is nearing his 100th day in office. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

A top Trump aide stopped shy of admitting the new administration has made mistakes, despite a turbulent three months as President Donald Trump nears his 100th day in office.

“I don’t regret anything,” a senior White House official told reporters Tuesday evening.

Decision Day for Avoiding a Government Shutdown?
Appropriators think that decision on another stopgap bill could come today

Appropriations Committee member Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Ky., a former chairman, says there are still some “knotty issues” to work out on a 2017 spending bill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Appropriators think they are close to a deal to fund the government through September, but the hour is fast approaching where a stopgap might be needed to prevent a shutdown at midnight Friday.

Kentucky Rep. Harold Rogers, a former Appropriations chairman and still a senior member of the committee, described the leaders as, “within striking distance” on a fiscal 2017 spending bill.

Enzi Apologizes for ‘Poor Choice of Words’ on LGBTs
Said at high school last week that guy into tutu who goes into bars and gets in fights ‘kind of asks for it’

Sen. Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., apologized for his "poor choice of words" after a meeting at a high school. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Wyoming Sen. Mike Enzi apologized Tuesday for comments he made last week that were seen as insensitive to the LGBT community.

Speaking at Greybull High School last week, Enzi was asked what he was doing to help Wyoming’s LGBT community.