Sheila Jackson Lee

Lawmakers Renew Efforts to Pass Family Separation Bill
But with House already out for recess, no legislative solution possible until September

A girl participates in a rally at Freedom Plaza in downtown Washington on June 27 to to protest the Trump administration policy that separated migrant children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers say they are renewing efforts to find what has been elusive legislation to keep families together at the U.S.-Mexico border, as the Trump administration announced it would meet the latest court deadline for reuniting more than 1,400 children it had separated from their immigrant parents.

Department of Homeland Security officials said they expected to complete all “eligible” reunifications by midnight Thursday, Pacific time. Beyond those, 711 children remain in custody because they’re not “eligible” for reunification, according to the department. Of those, 431 have a parent who was deported from the U.S. without them, officials said.

Time Running Out for Violence Against Women Act
Lack of bipartisan sponsorship could slow process

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, lauded protections for Native American women in the reauthorization measure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Violence Against Women Act will expire at the end of September if lawmakers don’t act on a bill to extend the protections introduced by Democrats just before the House leaves town for the August recess.

Congress first passed the landmark domestic violence law in 1993 and most recently reauthorized it in 2013. House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer urged chamber Republicans not to hold up the new proposal by “playing politics.”

Walmart Provides $2M for Black, Hispanic Caucus Internships
Goal is to ‘expand the pipeline of talent on Capitol Hill and beyond,’ retail giant says

Rep. Joaquin Castro, chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, welcomes the Walmart funding as a way to address underrepresentation of Latinos on Capitol Hill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Walmart is giving away $2 million so African-American and Hispanic young people can intern on Capitol Hill.

The retail giant will split the money between the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute.

Lawmakers Condemn Trump Over News Conference With Putin
Republican calls it ‘shameful’ while Democrat says trip was ‘one giant middle finger... to his own country’

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive at Helsinki International Airport on Sunday ahead of Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

As President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin left their joint press conference in Monday in Helsinki, Finland, to continue with their slate of meetings, lawmakers back home in Washington sent a resounding rebuke across the Atlantic to the president.

Perhaps loudest in his criticism of Trump was one of the most prominent members of his own party: Arizona Sen. John McCain.

Democrats Blast Nielsen’s Family Separation ‘Lie’ as Outrage Intensifies
DHS secretary says ‘we do not have a policy of separating families at the border’

U.S. Border Patrol agents take groups of Central American asylum-seekers into custody last week near McAllen, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Democrats in Congress accused Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen of lying amid intensifying outrage over a Trump administration policy requiring border agents to separate migrant children from their parents.

Several members of Congress called Nielsen out after she tweeted Sunday evening “we do not have a policy of separating families at the border.”

Louise Slaughter Dead at 88 After More Than Three Trailblazing Decades in Congress
New York Democrat fell and suffered concussion at D.C. residence last week

New York Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, who became the first chairwoman of the House Rules Committee in 2007, has died. In this July 2014 photo with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Slaughter and other members appear at a press conference following the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, the first woman to chair the House Rules Committee, died early Friday after falling at her Washington home last week. She was 88 years old.

Her office said the New York Democrat died at George Washington University Hospital, where she was being treated. The 16-term lawmaker was the oldest sitting member of Congress.

NFL Player’s Drive for Social Justice Takes Him to the Hill
Thomas spearheading alliance between ‘athlete activists’ and politicians

Miami Dolphins safety Michael Thomas poses for photos on the House steps at the Capitol last week during his four-day externship arranged by the NFL Players Association. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

On the Friday before the first Sunday of the 2016 NFL season, the entire Miami Dolphins team gathered on the field after practice in Seattle.

No coaches. No trainers. No front-office staff. It was a players-only meeting.

House Judiciary Advances Foreign Lobby Overhaul
Panel Democrats say GOP is moving too quickly on the bill

Ex-lobbyist Paul Manafort, a former Trump campaign chairman, has been charged with violating the Foreign Agents Registration Act. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

House Republicans took a significant step Wednesday in an effort to overhaul the nation’s foreign lobbying disclosure regulations amid scandals in the influence sector.

The House Judiciary Committee advanced as amended, 15-6 along party lines, the measure that would give the Justice Department new subpoena-like investigative powers. That new authority sparked controversy among the panel’s Democrats.

House Bill Would Create More Oversight on Efforts to Disclose Cyber Vulnerabilities
Department of Homeland Security would be required to file annual report

A bill introduced by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, would expand oversight over how federal authorities work with the private sector to disclose cyber vulnerabilities. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bill to expand congressional oversight over how the Department of Homeland Security works with the private sector to disclose cyber vulnerabilities is now before the Senate after it passed the House by voice vote last week.

The bill, introduced by Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas, would require DHS to submit an annual report to Congress describing the process the federal government uses to disclose cybersecurity flaws it discovers to the private sector and other affected organizations. The bill would include information about how DHS is working with other federal agencies and managers of private cyber infrastructure to mitigate susceptibility to cyberattacks.

Lawmakers Object to DOJ Move on Marijuana Enforcement
Sen. Cory Gardner says Sessions’ decision opens states’ rights issues

Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner said the change in the DOJ‘s marijuana policy was a “trampling of Colorado’s right, its voters.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions drew strong criticism from lawmakers Thursday for changing a Justice Department policy on marijuana enforcement that had allowed states to move forward on legalizing the drug’s recreational and medical use.

Sessions’ move upsets the uneasy status quo between state laws that legalize marijuana and the federal laws against possession and distribution, which was set up by Obama administration guidelines from the Justice Department. Sessions rescinded the Obama guidelines Thursday, which cast uncertainty on what had been a growing pot industry just days after California implemented a recreational pot law.