SOTU

Chants, Silent Protests in Chamber for Obama's Final SOTU

Obama shakes hands with Biden and Ryan as he arrives to deliver his final State of the Union address to a Joint Session of Congress in Washington. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Paul D. Ryan and Joseph R. Biden squared off during a vice presidential debate at a small Kentucky college four years ago, perhaps the last place they expected to meet again would be seated above the House floor for President Barack Obama's final State of the Union address. But in the moments before the president began a speech about ending partisanship, the Republican speaker and the Democratic vice president chatted amiably for several minutes.  

Around them the House chamber buzzed with a hundred conversations. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack gravitated to the bright red sweater-vest of Sen. Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, with Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, joining them. Republican presidential hopeful Marco Rubio of Florida, back in Washington tending to senatorial duties, ended up chatting and laughing with Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. Graham has returned to the Senate full time, of course, having pulled the plug on his own 2016 White House bid.  

Watch Live: Gov. Nikki Haley Gives GOP SOTU Response

Haley will deliver the GOP response to Obama's final State of the Union address. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Gov. Nikki R. Haley, R-S.C., delivers the Republican rebuttal to President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union address.

Coverage begins following the conclusion of Obama’s remarks.

Roll Call Presents: The 2016 State of the Union

Obama prepares to deliver his 2015 State of the Union address on Capitol Hill. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Roll Call presents the 2016 State of the Union, the final State of the Union address of Barack Obama’s presidency.

Coverage begins at 8:45 p.m. EST.

Harry Reid Admits to Dozing Off During Previous SOTUs

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid confessed Tuesday to dozing off during past State of the Union addresses, though not on President Barack Obama's watch.  

The response came somewhat unexpectedly when the Nevada Democrat was asked if there was anything he would not want to hear from Obama in the speech.