staffers

Report Casts Doubt on ‘Unhinged’ Duncan Hunter Ad
An attack ad looks to tie his opponent to terrorism through a Muslim civil rights group

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., walks down the House steps after final votes of the week in the Capitol on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A report Friday raises new doubts about Rep. Duncan Hunter’s claim that his opponent accepted contributions from an Islamic advocacy group, intensifying criticisms that the congressman has relied on a racist line of attack based on Democratic opponent Ammar Campa-Najjar’s Palestinian heritage in the final stretch of his campaign.

An attack ad casts Democrat Campa-Najjar’s contributions from the Council on American-Islamic Relations as part of a “well-orchestrated plan to infiltrate Congress.”

Anti-Hacking 18-Wheeler Parks Near the Capitol
Congressional aides got some advice from IBM experts ahead of the midterms

The IBM C-TOC training room seats 20 staffers and was standing room only during the training on Thursday. (Alex Gangitano/ Roll Call)

Congressional staffers naively joined a public Wi-Fi network as they settled in for an hour-long cybersecurity training. Little did they know that any websites they browsed on their phones were about to flash on a giant screen.

There was nothing too embarrassing. At least one person was killing time on ESPN.com.

House GOP Incumbents Spent Hundreds of Thousands in Legal Fees to Head Off Crises
Mia Love, Scott Taylor, Chris Collins and Duncan Hunter all face competitive races

Rep. David Schweikert, R-Ariz., spent nearly $185,000 in campaign money on legal fees in the third quarter that ended Sept. 30. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least six House Republicans combined to spend more than $325,000 in campaign funds in the most recent quarter alone on legal or crisis management fees related to brewing scandals that have wended their way into the court of public opinion — and, in some cases, real courtrooms.

New York Rep. Chris Collins, whom federal authorities indicted on Aug. 8 on 10 counts related to insider trading and securities fraud, shelled out $30,980.25 from his campaign account to the D.C.-based law firm BakerHostetler just three days later.

Stanley Cup Finally Gets Its D.C. Day in the Capitol
Washington hockey fans make the most of their first ever NHL championship

A Capitol Police officer takes a selfie with the NHL's Stanley Cup in the Capitol on Wednesday. The Cup, which was won by the Washington Capitals in June, made a few stops on the Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

When the Stanley Cup was in the Capitol, true Washington Capitals fans stood apart from other hockey fans taking a quick break from their jobs during a recess day to see the famous trophy.

Many were wearing their allegiance on their chest.

Mia Love Claims FEC Cleared Her — Others Say Not So Fast
Utah GOP rep raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for primary race she didn’t face

Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, has been nagged by an ongoing dispute about money she raised for a primary race that never happened. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Utah Rep. Mia Love does not appear to be out of the woods just yet over a complaint filed with the Federal Election Commission over funds she raised for a GOP primary race she allegedly knew she would not have.

That’s despite Love claiming in a statement Monday night that the FEC has cleared her of any wrongdoing after she agreed to re-designate roughly $370,000 in campaign contributions made between the GOP nominating convention in April and the June primary date, when Love did not face a Republican challenger.

Cory Gardner Has a Really Good Mitch McConnell Impression
Take Five: Gardner’s staff wants him to act cool in front of celebrities

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., never got to tell Powers Boothe that he loves “Red Dawn.” (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Cory Gardner’s impression of Mitch McConnell was spot-on as he described that time during the tax debate when the pair talked marijuana.

The Colorado Republican has embraced the cannabis industry. But some of his colleagues aren’t so sure.

Scott Taylor Campaign Spends Thousands on Legal Fees, Still Paid Staffers in Petition Fraud Scandal
Taylor maintains he knew nothing but promised to fire any involved staffers

Rep. Scott Taylor, R-Va., leaves the Capitol after the last votes in the House before the Memorial Day recess on May 24, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The political scandal surrounding Virginia Rep. Scott Taylor’s campaign is still simmering as a state special prosecutor investigates allegations that four of Taylor’s campaign staffers and advisers forged dozens — possibly hundreds — of constituent signatures to help a third-party candidate onto the ballot this November.

The 2nd District Republican continued to pay the four staffers accused of committing the forgeries, a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a $2,500 fine, his third-quarter filing with the Federal Elections Commission shows.

Walter Huddleston, Kentucky Senator Who Preceded Mitch McConnell, Dead at 92
Democrat lost to current majority leader in 1984

Former Sen. Walter D. Huddleston, seen here in 1983, died on Tuesday. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Walter D. Huddleston, a two-term Democratic senator from Kentucky, died Tuesday at 92.

Huddleston was upset in his 1984 re-election bid to a young Republican county-judge executive named Mitch McConnell.

Remembering Tim Johnson: Congressional Baseball Game Was the ‘Love of His Life’
Former Oxley staffer died at 59 years old

Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, center, sets the lineup during a scrimmage between Republican team members in 2016 with Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Mich., right, and coach Tim Johnson, left. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former staffer and Congressional Baseball Game staple Tim Johnson died Sunday after a decade-long battle with multiple myeloma.

He died at his sister’s house in Leola, Pennsylvania, at 59 years old. He had just celebrated his birthday Oct. 3.

Is Beto O’Rourke the Next Jon Ossoff?
Democrats can’t seem to help falling for white, Southern men in unlikely races

Democrat Beto O’Rourke historic fundraising numbers set off alarm bells in the GOP that the Texas Senate race was not one to be ignored, Murphy writes. Above, O’Rourke arrives for a rally in Lockhart, Texas, on Oct. 1. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — There have been so many glowing profiles of Beto O’Rourke, the Democratic Senate hopeful in Texas, that there is a running joke  among journalists about the ingredients for a perfect O’Rourke piece. The short version goes something like this: He looks like a Kennedy! He’s got tons of cash! He’s a Democrat in a Red State! Let’s do this thing!

The one detail that’s almost always missing in those profiles is reality — namely, the fact that O’Rourke could run a perfect race against Sen. Ted Cruz and will still probably lose based solely on the fact that far more Republicans are likely to vote in Texas this November than Democrats. Although twice as many Texans (about 1 million) voted in the Democratic primary this year compared to 2014, 1.5 million votes were cast in the Republican primary. Even as the state’s demographics are changing, the math for Texas Democrats still doesn’t look good.