Lawmakers Push for Sexual Harassment Bill in Spending Package
Bipartisan coalition, Speaker want legislation included in omnibus

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wisc., left, and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., arrive to hold a press conference following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, March 20, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans and Democrats are making a last-minute bid to add legislation that would address the sexual harassment of staffers by members of Congress on the omnibus appropriations bill.

With dozens of policy issues still in flux as part of the full-year fiscal 2018 spending package, some lawmakers are upset by indications a bill that would implement robust sexual harassment policies in Congress is currently not part of the omnibus. The House passed the anti-sexual harassment measure, as well as sweeping rules changes aimed at protecting staffers, by voice vote on Feb. 6.

Democratic Campaigns Start Unionizing in #MeToo Era
Move could protect against sexual harassment and lead to better employee benefits

Wisconsin Democrat Randy Bryce, who is challenging Speaker Paul D. Ryan, says letting his campaign workers unionize was “a natural thing to do.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Randy Bryce’s campaign for Wisconsin’s 1st District was only two staffers deep, one of them told him he was thinking of forming a union.

“There wasn’t really thought involved,” said the Democrat challenging Speaker Paul D. Ryan about allowing his campaign staff to unionize.

New Group Wants to Bring Staffers Together Through Golf
Lewis Myers is the commissioner of the Congressional Golf Association

Lewis Myers in 2017 with the Quicken Loans Trophy, awarded to the winner of a PGA tournament hosted by Tiger Woods. The tournament and its proceeds make an impact in the D.C. community. (Courtesy  Lewis Myers)

Congressional staffers are trying whatever they can to bring people together in this tough political climate, and Lewis Myers thinks the golf course might be a place to do that.

“The golf ball doesn’t really recognize Republican or Democrat, so we should be able to come together and play the game we love,” said the six-year Capitol Hill veteran, who is the scheduler for California Democratic Rep. Norma J. Torres.

Shooter Targets Rep. Loudermilk but Misses, Congressman Says
FBI investigating September incident in which bullet was found embedded in back of car

Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga., was shot at during two separate incidents in 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

For the second time in less than a year, a shooter took aim at Rep. Barry Loudermilk but missed, the congressman said.

Loudermilk was driving through the North Georgia mountains in September with his wife when they heard a “thump” hit the back of their car, the Georgia Republican told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in a recent interview.

Congress to Explore Sexual Harassment in the Service Industry
Bipartisan Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues hosting hearing Monday

Rep. Lois Frankel, D-Fla., says for women working in the service industry, “quitting is not an option.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congress wants to take a harder look at victims of sexual harassment who don’t have much clout.

The bipartisan Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues is hosting a hearing, “Beyond the Headlines: Combating Service Sector Sexual Harassment in the Age of #MeToo” on Monday.

Expect More Trump on Nomination Fights, Short Says
Legislative affairs chief decries Democrats even as Senate awaits nominees

White House Legislative Affairs Director Marc Short offered more criticism of Senate Democrats on nominations Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Clark file photo)

The White House renewed its complaints Friday about the pace of Senate action on nominations Friday, even as President Donald Trump is making the “personnel business” more complicated by shifting his Cabinet and other senior staff positions.

White House Legislative Affairs Director Marc Short described himself as a “warm-up act” and suggested President Donald Trump soon will make a larger “foray” into the nominations debate.

Jim McGovern Most Likely to Take Over for Slaughter on Rules Panel
Massachusetts Democrat to serve acting ranking member until Pelosi names successor

Ranking member Louise Slaughter and Massachusetts Rep. Jim McGovern confer before a House Rules hearing in the Capitol in July 2014. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After House Rules ranking member Louise Slaughter’s death, Rep. Jim McGovern will take over her committee post in an acting capacity, and remains the most likely candidate to succeed her. 

The Massachusetts Democrat was the second-highest-ranking Democrat on Rules behind Slaughter. McGovern’s seniority grants him the opportunity to serve as acting ranking member in her absence, as he did this week while she was in the hospital for a concussion. Slaughter, 88, the first woman to head the Rules panel, died Friday

Photos of the Week: Waiting for Spring in Washington
The week of March 12 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Evelyn Black, two-and-a half, of Capitol Hill, walks through about 7,000 pairs of shoes displayed on the East Lawn of the Capitol on Tuesday to represent the approximately 7,000 children who were killed by guns since the Sandy Hook shooting in 2012. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Women Who Run the Show
Monica Popp and Alexis Covey-Brandt are chiefs of staff in leadership offices

Monica Popp has been Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn’s chief for almost three years. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans haven’t exactly followed the advice of conservative icon Margaret Thatcher, who liked to say, “If you want anything done, ask a woman.”

The GOP has five female senators, and none in leadership. It can seem like a man’s caucus, at least from the outside looking in.

Rep. Zoe Lofgren on When ‘Administrative Assistants Ran the Hill’
California Democrat started out as a staffer in the 1970s

California Rep. Zoe Lofgren started out as an intern on Capitol Hill right out of college. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Rep. Zoe Lofgren was a staffer forty years ago, articles of impeachment were flying. Still, she thinks Congress is more chaotic now.

The California Democrat replaced her former boss, Rep. Don Edwards, after he retired in 1994.