State of the Union

Democrats back Pelosi decision to delay State of the Union as Republicans cry politics
Pelosi can prevent joint session from occurring Jan. 29 since Congress has yet to pass a concurrent resolution setting date

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., here with Reps. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., right, and Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., wants the State of the Union delayed until the government is reopened. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats lined up behind Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to delay the State of the Union until the government is reopened, even as Republicans decried the California Democrat for playing hardball politics, saying the speech should occur Jan. 29 as scheduled.

Pelosi jolted Washington on Wednesday when she sent a letter to President Donald Trump seeking to postpone a joint session of Congress to receive his annual address. While she offered it as a suggestion, it’s ultimately her call.

Pelosi Invites Trump for State of the Union
California Democrat sends letter to president Thursday evening

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., here Thursday with House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, has invited President Donald Trump to deliver his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Jan. 29. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Nancy Pelosi, hours after being sworn in as speaker Thursday, invited President Donald Trump to give his upcoming State of the Union speech before a joint session of Congress.

“In the spirit of our Constitution, I invite you to deliver your State of the Union address before a Joint Session of Congress on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019 in the House Chamber,” the California Democrat wrote in a letter to the president Thursday evening.

Capitol Ink | SOTU Stock Ticker

The Faces Behind the Bipartisan Fight Against Heroin

   

An NBA player who whose heart stopped for 30 seconds during an overdose, a daughter who discovered her father dead, a sister whose brother overdosed before she even knew he was taking drugs and a father whose son died after years in and out of rehab — these are the faces that lawmakers see as they work for passage of what could be this year's most bipartisan legislative push.  

Haley Takes 'Good First Step' on National Stage

Haley solidified her position as a vice presidential contender in her Republican response to Obama's address Tuesday night. (Courtesy GOP.GOV)

On Tuesday night, South Carolina Gov. Nikki R. Haley did what she was supposed to do in the Republican response to the State of the Union: Draw a contrast between President Barack Obama’s vision and what she said was America’s “chance to turn in a new direction.”

But most of her address was an implicit rebuke of GOP front-runner Donald Trump and some of the xenophobic rhetoric that’s animated the Republican presidential primary.

Watch Live: Gov. Nikki Haley Gives GOP SOTU Response

Haley will deliver the GOP response to Obama's final State of the Union address. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Gov. Nikki R. Haley, R-S.C., delivers the Republican rebuttal to President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union address.

Coverage begins following the conclusion of Obama’s remarks.

Roll Call Presents: The 2016 State of the Union

Obama prepares to deliver his 2015 State of the Union address on Capitol Hill. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Roll Call presents the 2016 State of the Union, the final State of the Union address of Barack Obama’s presidency.

Coverage begins at 8:45 p.m. EST.

After State of the Union, Nikki Haley Won't Have GOP's Last Word

After South Carolina's Haley wraps up her remarks, other Republicans will deliver their own responses to Obama’s final State of the Union. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When South Carolina Gov. Nikki R. Haley ends her response to President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address on Tuesday night, hers will not be the last word for the Republican Party.  

After the rising star wraps up her remarks, at least two Republicans — and likely more, including some of the party's presidential aspirants — will deliver their own responses to Obama’s final speech of this kind. For starters, Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, a seventh-term Republican from Florida, will deliver a response in Spanish, and Nevada conservative activist Wayne Allyn Root will deliver a response on behalf of the Tea Party Express.

The Mystery Driver Who Nearly Crashed 2015 SOTU

A Capitol Police officer surveys the East Front of the Capitol on Jan. 5. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

It was the high-speed chase that nearly crashed last year’s State of the Union address: Several Maryland police cruisers pursued a driver who came close to slamming right into officers at a barricade near the Capitol.  

The incident provoked a power struggle among local law enforcement agencies, heightened security concerns and eroded support for the already embattled chief of the Capitol Police, Kim C. Dine.  

SOTU: A Non-Political Speech About Politics

Obama acknowledges applause before his address to a joint session of Congress in February 2009. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Pool/AP File Photo)

The White House on Monday described President Barack Obama’s final address to Congress  as a non-political speech that will focus on the fate of future generations — but also on politics.

Obama’s primary focus will be on explaining to the American people “the opportunities  and challenges” facing the country over the next few years, Press Secretary Josh Earnest told reporters. He wants the lawmakers he will address to understand the decisions they make in coming months will have ramifications for decades to come.