Supreme Court

Stupak Shares Insider Look at Obamacare Debate in New Book
In a timely release, Michigan Democrat recalls his amendment that saved bill

Former Michigan Rep. Bart Stupak has a new book on his experiences during the 2010 health care law debate. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Rep. Bart Stupak didn’t plan the release of his new book on his crucial vote for the 2010 health care law to coincide with the current debate over repealing it. 

“Timing was fortuitous,” the Michigan Democrat said. “I thought by now, the Republicans would have their bill done and there wouldn’t be a book.”

McCain: ‘I’ll be Back Soon’
Thanks well-wishers for ‘outpouring of support’

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., received best wishes from all across the political world after his diagnosis was announced. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. John McCain thanked well-wishers for their support upon hearing he had been diagnosed with brain cancer, saying he would be back “soon.”

McCain, who had undergone surgery to remove a blood clot at the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix and was later found to have brain cancer, tweeted “I greatly appreciate the outpouring of support.”

Opinion: For Whom and What Do Faith Leaders Pray?
White evangelicals still strongly in president’s corner

President Donald Trump attended a worship service at the International Church of Las Vegas in October as a candidate. He reached out to evangelical Christians for support during the 2016 campaign. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Were their prayers answered?

White — most of them, anyway — evangelicals, recently photographed laying hands on President Donald Trump perhaps were praying that the proposed Senate health care bill, the one estimates predicted would result in millions losing care or Medicaid coverage, would fail.

John Bush Nomination Exposes Partisan Divide
Kentucky jurist’s anonymous blog posts brings up questions of temperament

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley and ranking member Dianne Feinstein are not on the same page when it comes to the nomination of John Bush to the federal bench. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The nomination of John Bush to be a federal appellate court judge underscores how swiftly Senate Republicans can help President Donald Trump reshape the nation’s courts in a conservative direction.

Bush, nominated for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, cleared a procedural hurdle in the Senate on Wednesday on a 51-48 vote. Democrats now have an opportunity to air their concerns on the floor ahead of a final confirmation vote later this week.

‘The Originalist’ Is a Modern Story of a Cultural Icon
Play returns to D.C.’s Arena Stage for first time since Scalia’s death

Jade Wheeler, as Cat, and Edward Gero, as the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, are sparring partners in Arena Stage’s return production of “The Originalist.” (Gary W. Sweetman/Asolo Repertory Theatre)

The concept of watching the portrayal of a polarizing and legendary 21st-century figure, who died just last year, is more difficult to grasp than initially predicted.

“The Originalist,” a political drama about the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, returned to D.C.’s Arena Stage this month, more than two years after its 2015 debut when the justice was still alive.

Judge Narrows Trump's Travel Ban Enforcement

From left, Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., and Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., protested the administration's travel ban when it was unveiled earlier this year.  (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump administration can’t stop grandparents and other relatives of someone in the United States from entering the country under its enforcement of the revised travel ban, a federal judge in Hawaii ruled late Thursday.

The ruling is a legal setback for President Donald Trump’s temporary ban against travelers from six majority-Muslim countries, and could prompt the government to take the issue back to the Supreme Court during the justices’ summer recess.

Alabama GOP Senate Candidates Fight Over Loyalty to Trump
Strange and Brooks both claim allegiance to the president

Alabama Senate candidate, Rep. Mo Brooks, says he supported President Donald Trump in the general election, after backing Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in the primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump may be embroiled in scandal in Washington, D.C. But in Alabama — a state he won by nearly 30 points last fall — he remains extremely popular.

Look no farther the the state’s midsummer Republican Senate primary, where 10 candidates are running for the nomination to fill out the term of former Sen. Jeff Sessions, now Trump’s attorney general. Two of the top three candidates — with their supporters’ help — are trying to outdo each other in expressing loyalty to the president.

Pence Pitches Paul in Kentucky
Bevin disparages idea that expanding health coverage is good

Vice President Mike Pence went to Kentucky to try to shore up the support of Sen. Rand Paul, who was back in Washington and getting seemingly further away from what the vice president wants on health care legislation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Vice President Mike Pence hasn’t given up on winning over Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the commonwealth’s senior senator, has been leading the effort to craft the latest variant of repeal and replacement legislation that’s expected to be revealed Thursday.

Mapping Out 2018 in the Senate
Democrats are still on the defensive but can’t be dismissed

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange faces a competitive Republican special election primary next month. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Eight months into the 2018 election cycle and with 16 months to go, the fundamentals of the Senate map haven’t changed.

One state has been added to the map: Alabama.

Opinion: Don’t Skip the Recess, Skip the Games
It’s time to change the dynamic in Washington, not the calendar

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can blame his own party for slowing down progress on the health care bill, Murphy writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced to his members Tuesday that he’s canceling the first two weeks of the August recess to plow through a pile of undone business, including passing health care reform, a debt-ceiling increase, the Department of Defense authorization bill, and a Food and Drug Administration user authorization bill.

It’s easy to see why McConnell decided to push back the recess. For one thing, the rowdy town hall meetings in some senators’ home states last week were probably unpleasant enough to convince anyone that August in Washington is totally underrated. Two more weeks in the swamp? Great!