Supreme Court

Luther Strange Gets First Primary Challenger
Suspended state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore enters Alabama Senate race

Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., will face a primary challenge from the state's suspended Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Roy Moore, the suspended Alabama Supreme Court chief justice, announced Wednesday that he’ll challenge Alabama Sen. Luther Strange in the Republican primary next year.

Moore, who was suspended in 2016 for telling probate judges not to follow federal orders on same-sex marriage, had previously been interviewed to replace Sen. Jeff Sessions after Sessions became U.S attorney general, but now-former Gov. Robert Bentley appointed Strange, the former state attorney general, to the seat, AL.com reported.

Top Trump Aide on First 100 Days: ‘I Don’t Regret Anything’
White House busily selling first three months as productive, critics disagree

The North Lawn of the White House, the Washington Monument, and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, seen from the roof of the Hay Adams Hotel. President Trump is nearing his 100th day in office. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

A top Trump aide stopped shy of admitting the new administration has made mistakes, despite a turbulent three months as President Donald Trump nears his 100th day in office.

“I don’t regret anything,” a senior White House official told reporters Tuesday evening.

Trump Challenges Federal Judge to High Court Duel Over Sanctuary Cities
President’s tweets rekindle battle with Ninth Circuit

President Donald Trump lashed out Wednesday at a federal judge who blocked another of his immigration executive orders. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump has a message for the federal judge who blocked his executive orders tailored to keep some so-called “sanctuary” cities from receiving federal funds: “See you in the Supreme Court!”

Trump took to Twitter before 7 a.m. Wednesday morning to blast a federal judge in California who on Tuesday issued a nationwide preliminary injunction against provisions in an executive order signed by Trump that is meant to block federal funding for “sanctuary” jurisdictions that decline to assist federal authorities in enforcing immigration laws.

Podcast: Trump's About-Face in His First 100 Days
The Big Story, Episode 51

The first 100 days of an administration have been used as a benchmark to gauge the progress made by a sitting president. Donald Trump’s first 100 days are punctuated by successes such as confirmation of a Supreme Court nominee and self-inflicted wounds such as the travel ban, says CQ Roll Call’s White House correspondent John T. Bennett. But what is most striking about Trump thus far, adds Bennett, is the difference between candidate Trump and President Trump.

Clerks for New Supreme Court Justice Know Capitol Hill
Gorsuch picks also have White House and justice department experience

Clerks for Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch have experience in the White House, the justice department and on Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The clerks Justice Neil Gorsuch hired to help launch his Supreme Court career bring a wealth of experience from the political branches of government, including work on Capitol Hill, at the Justice Department and the White House.

That, in turn, could help guide Gorsuch on legal issues this term dealing with cases about the inner workings of Congress or politics. While Gorsuch worked for the Justice Department before becoming a federal judge, Justice Stephen G. Breyer is the only justice with experience working for the legislative branch  — as Senate Judiciary Committee counsel in 1979-80 for Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.

3 Things to Watch as Trump Hits 100 Days
 

With President Donald Trump’s 100th day in the Oval Office arriving this weekend, Roll Call’s White House reporter John T. Bennett delves into what to watch for in the days leading up to this administration’s first big milestone.

Syria, Trump and Congress’ Ever-Eroding War Powers
Lawmakers lukewarm to a force-authorization measure for U.S. missile strike

President Donald Trump and his national security team receive a briefing on April 6 about an air strike he ordered on a Syrian air base. (White House photo)

President Donald Trump has gone to great lengths to break from the policies and approaches of his predecessor. Yet, when it came to justifying a round of U.S. military missile strikes in Syria, the new commander in chief dusted off a legal rationale crafted by Barack Obama’s administration.

Like the 44th president, Trump contended that the Constitution vests in the office of the presidency enough war powers to carry out some isolated military operations without lawmakers’ approval.

White House Plans Week of Activities as Trump’s 100th Day Approaches
President still lacks a big legislative victory amid record low approval ratings

President Donald Trump prepares to sign an executive order last week in Wisconsin aimed at bringing jobs back to American. His 100th day in office is fast approaching without a legislative win. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Updated at 8:41 a.m. | The White House has prepared an action-packed week for President Donald Trump ahead of his 100th day in office, including the unveiling of the “principles” behind his tax overhaul plan and more executive orders.

Trump and his senior staff are gearing up to make the case it will be the most productive 100 days for any president in 84 years. Democrats, meanwhile, will be pushing their position — that the 45th president has spent his first few months in office breaking his campaign promises.

Will He or Won’t He? Hatch Keeps Utah in Suspense
Senate’s most senior Republican weighs an eighth term

Utah Sen. Orrin G. Hatch was first elected to the Senate in 1976. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There’s been a question on the minds of many Utahans lately: Will Sen. Orrin G. Hatch run for an eighth term?

“While I have taken steps to run, I have yet to make a final decision,” Hatch, the most senior GOP senator, said in a statement. “I remain focused on my work in the Senate and will make any political decisions in due course.”

Liberal PAC Makes First Senate Endorsements of 2018
Brown, Baldwin and Tester score early backing from End Citizens United

Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown and Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin have earned the endorsement of End Citizens United. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Three Democratic senators from states carried by President Donald Trump last fall have earned the backing of an influential liberal political action committee.

End Citizens United announced its support Thursday for the re-election campaigns of Sens. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Jon Tester of Montana, in its first endorsements of the 2018 cycle.