tax cut

David Hawkings’ Whiteboard: How Two Bills Become One Law
 

Trump's Post-Thanksgiving Tax Bill Hopes Hang on Four Key Senators
Penn Ave. Report: Connecting Congress and the White House at the intersection of politics

House GOP 'Giddy' After Tax Bill Win, But Will the Senate Kill the Mood?
An executive summary of Roll Call’s biggest stories, from the reporters themselves 

Trump’s Return from Asia Could Complicate Tax Cut Plans
Connecting Congress and the White House at the intersection of politics 

Who’s Getting to Write the Tax Bill
Roll Call Decoder with David Hawkings

How do the Senate Finance and House Ways and Means committee members get their assignments?  Political bomb-throwers rarely get the call. Facing a tough campaign is a plus. So are party loyalty and K Street support. Senior editor David Hawkings explains.

Trump Keeps Adding to the Congressional To-Do List
 

GOP Tax Messaging Heavy on Business Benefits
‘It all leads to the same end,’ speaker said of trickle-down effect of tax legislation

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Rep. Andy Harris speak to employees at Dixon Valve & Coupling Company about the GOP’s still developing tax legislation. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

CHESTERTOWN, Md. – “Cutting taxes is great for the businesses to make businesses more money. But how is that going to lower my taxes, or make sure it comes down to me?” That was the question a 20-year-old Dixon Valve & Coupling employee posed to Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Thursday.

Visiting the company’s headquarters to promote the GOP’s still developing tax legislation, Ryan told the employee that he plans to lower taxes on individuals so they take home more of their paychecks. Then he quickly pivoted back to his primary message.

Will Obama Threaten to Veto Senate’s Tax-Cut Bill?

Obama is against a tax extenders package that is not paid for and has criticized the House for not passing an unemployment extension. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Defying the White House and a yearslong push for more revenue, Senate Democrats are on the verge of passing an $85 billion grab bag of tax cuts with no plans to pay for them.  

The question now is whether President Barack Obama will stick to his guns and threaten to veto the bill — picking an intraparty fight in an election year with control of the Senate at stake.