the-big-story

Podcast: All Politics Is State and Local
The Big Story, Episode 80

Roll Call columnist Walter Shapiro, left, and Leadership Editor Jason Dick discuss the politics of the tax overhaul on The Big Story Podcast on Nov. 15, 2017. (Toula Vlahou/CQ Roll Call)

All politics is state and local.

Positions on the Republican tax legislation break down not just on a partisan level but regional ones. That's because several members of the House, including vulnerable Republicans, represent high-tax states like New York and New Jersey where their constituents currently deduct state and local taxes from their federal returns. 

At the Races: 362 Days to Go
Our weekly roundup of Roll Call’s top campaign stories and more

Republican senators started to abandon Alabama Senate GOP nominee Roy Moore after the Washington Post published allegations of a sexual encounter with a minor. Moore visited the Capitol on Oct. 31. Read the Roll Call story. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

We’re officially one year out from the 2018 midterms. (Hard to believe, right?) There are a lot of House and Senate races to watch, and you can keep track of them all with At the Races. Each week we’ll round up our top stories and bring you some new content, like the Reader’s Race (scroll down for more on that). Make sure to sign up *here* to receive the newsletter next Thursday. We want to hear from you! Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone and Bridget  

This week… Voters went to the polls, Martha McSally discussed her Senate run, three Republicans retired and Utah got a new congressman. Here’s what happened At the Races:

Cassidy Eyes Changes to Health Care Bill While Trying to Win Support
Senate GOP opted not to take a vote on measure last week

Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy has not given up on his health care overhaul plans. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy said there will be changes to a proposal he wrote to overhaul the 2010 health law as he and fellow Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina try to win more support for the measure while other lawmakers focus on tax legislation.

“There are some things that inevitably have to change, but we do think that the format of what we’re doing and the principles of what we’re doing are good and that the American people will like it because it’s ultimately about fairness,” Cassidy said Monday on the Big Story Podcast with CQ Roll Call.

Podcast: The Suburban House Districts of Brotherly Love?
The Big Story, Episode 69

Podcast: Jeff Flake Feels the Heat
The Big Story, Episode 68

Arizona Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake talk before the start of the Senate Foreign Relations hearing to debate the authorization for use of military force in Syria on Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Jeff Flake's path to re-election is complicated. The Arizona Republican was potentially vulnerable even before President Donald Trump touched down in Phoenix to criticize him at a campaign style rally.

Now Flake, who has argued for more civility in politics, finds himself in a big fight in both the GOP primary and, if he gets past that, a compressed general election. Roll Call elections analyst Nathan Gonzales discusses the 2018 Senate race in Arizona with Roll Call leadership editor Jason Dick on the Big Story Podcast.

Rating Change: Montana Special Creeps Closer to Tossup
Voters to decide Thursday who will replace Interior Secretary Zinke

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who won last year’s Democratic presidential primary in Montana, campaigned over the weekend with Democratic House candidate Rob Quist. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The special election for Montana’s at-large House seat hasn’t received as much as attention as the race in Georgia, but it’s a similar storyline: Democrats are doing better than expected and an upset is within the realm of possibility.

Less than a week before the Thursday, May 25, election, wealthy former software executive Greg Gianforte has a narrow advantage over his Democratic opponent, musician Rob Quist. But Quist recently crossed the $5 million fundraising threshold, giving him ample resources to deliver his message in the final days in a relatively cheap state for advertising. 

Ep. 42: Democrats, Finally, Select a Chairman
The Big Story

For four long months, Democrats have debated what to do to get out of the political wilderness. This weekend, the Democratic National Committee votes on who will be its next chairman, putting that person in a position to weigh in on the party's next move.

Show Notes:

Do Clinton, Democrats Have a ‘Cousin Pookie’ Problem?
Obama makes 11th-hour push to get African-Americans to the polls

President Barack Obama greets people as he attends a campaign rally in support of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the University of Central Florida on Oct. 28. Obama has been asking African-Americans to get out and vote. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Call it the “Cousin Pookie” vote.

When President Barack Obama pleads with African-Americans to get to the polls, he often invokes a fictitious family couch-dweller who’s more inclined to watch football than ever cast a ballot. And evidence suggests “Pookie” isn’t very fired up this year, creating angst for Democrats up and down the ballot.

Ep. 20: Funding Fight Doesn't Squelch Zika Research
The Big Story

Though Congress and the Obama administration are still fighting over how to respond to the Zika virus outbreak, the gridlock hasn’t kept government scientists from trying to develop an effective vaccine. CQ Roll Call’s managing editor Adriel Bettelheim talks to senior Senate reporter Niels Lesniewski to learn more. 

Show Notes:

Special Episode: Brexit's Impact on the U.S.
A conversation with David Rennie, Washington bureau chief of The Economist

"The last thing the American government needs right now is global turmoil in any significant economy,'' says Rennie.