Thomas Massie

Senate Democrats Urge Trump Administration to Stop ‘Ghost Guns’
As of midnight Wednesday, instructions to build a 3D-printed firearm will be accessible to the public

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., leaves after speaking at the Senate Democrats’ downloadable 3D printed guns news conference in the Capitol on Tuesday, July 31, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

UPDATED 6:55 p.m. | With the clock ticking toward the release of publishable blueprints of 3D-printed guns, Democrats held a press conference Tuesday in a last-ditch effort to implore the White House to stop it.

As of Wednesday, nonprofit Defense Distributed will publish on its website instructions to build a 3D plastic gun named the Liberator. Democrats are worried these guns are undetectable, untraceable, and unrestrained: they won’t have a metal part and won’t be detected by metal detectors, they will not have a serial number to be tracked by law enforcement, and anyone will be able to build them without a background check.

Kids Curious About Conservative Values Hear From Jeff Sessions, David Perdue
Students from across the country descend on Washington this week to discuss leadership, conservatism

Attorney General Jeff Sessions arrives to testify before a House Appropriations Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee hearing in Rayburn Building on April 26, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Turning Point USA’s High School Leadership Summit kicked off its second day Tuesday with remarks from seven Washington officials, beginning with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Senator David Perdue.

Sessions commended the students for being politically aware at such a young age. While most students are focused on “pop culture or the latest fad,” these students were focused on the well-being of their country, he said at George Washington University on Tuesday.

GOP Runoff Victors Are Likely New Members of Congress
Mississippi’s Michael Guest and South Carolina’s William Timmons win comfortably

District Attorney Michael Guest won the GOP nomination in the runoff for Mississippi's 3rd District on Tuesday. (Courtesy of Friends of Michael Guest)

With victories in primary runoffs in Mississippi and South Carolina on Tuesday night, a pair of Republicans are likely heading to Congress next year. 

Michael Guest has won the Republican primary runoff in Mississippi’s open 3rd District, which GOP incumbent Gregg Harper is retiring after five terms.

GOP Chaos, Confusion Ahead of Thursday Immigration Votes
Prospects for passage appeared poor amid haphazard whip effort

Attorney General Jeff Sessions went to the House to ask Republicans to support the immigration bills the chamber will consider Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Confusion and chaos ensued Wednesday as House Republican leaders conducted a haphazard whip effort on a compromise immigration bill they planned to bring to the floor the next day. The prospects for the bill passing were clearly poor.

The frenetic feel of the day was similar to March 23, 2017. House GOP leaders spent that day engulfed in conversations with members as they tried to whip support for their bill to partially repeal and replace the 2010 health care law in an effort to vote on the law’s anniversary.

Rep. Massie Seeks K Street Campaign Cash After Blasting Lobbyist
Kentucky GOP lawmaker plans cigar and bourbon bash with downtown denizens this week.

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., is seeking campaign cash from the industry he had some choice words for recently.. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Thomas Massie created a fuss on K Street last week in chastising an unnamed lobbyist whom he said offered to help him raise money to secure a seat on the Ways and Means Committee. But apparently, the Kentucky Republican still wants political donations from K Street — in a smoke-filled room, no less, according to an invitation obtained by Roll Call.

Massie, in a documentary series called “The Swamp,” said a medical device industry lobbyist proposed helping him raise campaign money and assisting him in getting on the tax-writing and health-focused Ways and Means panel, according to a report in Politico.

Analysis: Leadership Race Not Over Despite Scalise Declining to Challenge McCarthy
McCarthy still needs to shore up support from conservatives, GOP candidates

From left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., are presenting a united front for now about the future leadership lineup. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republican leaders made moves Thursday to give the appearance that there won’t be any infighting about who should replace retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan as head of the conference. Don’t be fooled.

The race to replace Ryan is not over — unless Republicans lose the majority in November. In that scenario, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy would have the insider track to being elected minority leader since it would only require a simple majority vote of the GOP conference.

Read the Bill or Get Out of Town Quickly? On Omnibus, Congress Chooses the Latter
‘This is a Great Dane-sized whiz down the leg of every taxpayer in America,’ Sen. Kennedy says

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., compared the process of considering the omnibus appropriations package to a big dog urinating on taxpayers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Congress stares at a Friday deadline to fund the government, the reality that members will have scant time to actually read or process the $1.3 trillion fiscal 2018 omnibus before voting on it is starting to sink in.

The Wednesday night filing of the more than 2,200-page measure was the starting pistol that sent lawmakers into a mad dash against the government funding clock. They were given 52 hours.

NRA, Pro-Gun Lawmaker Exchange Fire Over New Bill
Kentucky GOP Rep. Massie says bill, which NRA supports, advances Obama’s agenda

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., is at odds with the NRA over his criticism of a bill that seeks to address deficiencies in the national gun background check database. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Kentucky Rep. Thomas Massie butted heads with the National Rifle Association Thursday over a new bill in Congress that addresses deficiencies in the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), the database of people who are not allowed to buy firearms in America.

The NRA, which has given more than $4,500 to Massie’s campaigns, said on its website the congressman was spreading misinformation about the bipartisan bill.

House Adopts Budget Resolution Paving Way for Tax Package
Measure could increase deficit by $1.5 trillion

The House adopted a budget resolution that is the GOP’s vehicle for a tax overhaul measure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House on Thursday adopted a fiscal 2018 budget resolution by a narrow margin, with supporters acknowledging it was little more than a vehicle for a still-developing tax measure.

“Most importantly this budget that we passed today brings us one step closer to tax reform,” House Speaker Paul D. Ryan said. 

Word on the Hill: Gifts for McCain
Partnership for Public Service awards, and staffer shuffle

A banner for Sen. John McCain flew over the University of Phoenix stadium. (Courtesy UltraViolet)

You would think it was Sen. John McCain’s birthday again. Since the Arizona Republican announced his opposition to the Graham-Cassidy health care bill, liberal groups have given him a cake, sent him cupcakes and flown a banner over the site of an NFL game.

UltraViolet delivered a cake to McCain’s Phoenix office Tuesday, and the women’s advocacy group also delivered one to the Portland office of Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine. The group chartered a plane to fly over the University of Phoenix Stadium before Monday’s Cardinals vs. Cowboys NFL game, thanking McCain for his opposition to the bill. Tailgaters and those preparing for the game were able to spot it, including reporter Ryan Haarer.