Tom Graves

With Tax Deal in the Works, Questions Turn to Timing
Deal could be announced as early as Tuesday, with votes next week

Capitol Hill was relatively calm Tuesday morning, as Washington braced for the results of the Alabama Senate election and timing on a vote on tax overhaul and spending is in flux. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Hill was relatively calm Tuesday morning, even as the timing on two big-ticket items — voting on a tax overhaul package and what to do about year-end spending questions — hung in the air unresolved and the nation remained fixated on Alabama’s special Senate election, where voting is underway.

House Republicans meeting as a conference at the Republican National Committee headquarters said there was no specific timeline for voting on the tax package, as the formal conference committee is set to meet, perhaps for the only time, Wednesday.

Freedom Caucus Seeks to Delink Tax and Spending Negotiations
Members threatened to sink motion to go to conference on tax overhaul

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows says there’s growing consensus for a longer stopgap funding bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Freedom Caucus on Monday threatened to sink a motion to go to conference on the tax overhaul — a procedural move they had been pushing for — in an attempt to negotiate a longer stopgap funding bill to delink upcoming tax and spending deadlines.

But in the end, all but one member of the 36-member hard-line conservative caucus voted for the motion to go to conference after Chairman Mark Meadows had a conversation off the floor with Speaker Paul D. Ryan, and other caucus members huddled on the floor with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Michigan Rep. Justin Amash was the only caucus member to vote against the motion, which was agreed to, 222-192.

Photos of the Day: Trump on the Hill Ahead of Tax Bill Passage
Thursday, Nov. 16, in photos

President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul D. Ryan leave a meeting with the House Republican Conference in the Capitol on Thursday to discuss the House GOP tax bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 2:10 p.m.| The House voted Thursday on a GOP plan to overhaul the U.S. tax code. The bill passed 227-205, with 13 Republicans voting against their party’s plan (here’s Roll Call’s full coverage of the vote).

Before the vote, President Donald Trump was at the Capitol to meet with the conference and discuss the bill. 

House Republicans Told Tax Details Are Coming
Ryan says outline being prepared

From left, House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, Reps. Tom Graves of Georgia and Michael McCaul of Texas, and House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers conduct a news conference in the Capitol on Wednesday after a conference meeting. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House and Senate tax writers plan to release the week of Sept. 25 an outline detailing their points of consensus with the administration on how to overhaul the tax code, Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Wednesday.

The Wisconsin Republican said House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady announced the intent to release more details of the still-developing tax overhaul plan during Wednesday’s House Republican Conference meeting.

House GOP Disgruntled Over Path on Spending Bill
Divisions over latest plan to break omnibus into chunks

Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., thinks Republicans will end up where they usually do: with a continuing resolution for the appropriations process until they can strike a deal after the start of the fiscal year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Much of the congressional focus lately has been on Senate Republicans’ intraparty divisions on health care, but House Republicans are having struggles of their own on other issues. And the frustration is mounting.

The House GOP Conference faced its latest setback Wednesday after their leadership announced the previous evening that they would move a four-bill, security-related appropriations package on the floor next week instead of a measure combining all 12 appropriations bills.

GOP Leaders Want Vote on National Security Appropriations Bills
Move suggests lack of support to pass full omnibus

Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., wanted the House to pass an omnibus spending bill before the August recess, but GOP leaders are pushing for a vote just on a package of national security-related appropriations bills. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

House GOP leaders on Tuesday announced a plan to have the chamber vote next week on a package of national security-related appropriations bills.

The announcement comes as a blow to several GOP lawmakers who had been pushing for the House to pass a 12-bill omnibus spending bill before the August recess.

D.C. Law Banning Wet Wipes Could Clog Appropriations
Fatbergs: An amalgamation of sewer waste made worse by pre-moistened wipes

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, seen here in 2016, joined other D.C. politicians at a news conference on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

By KELLIE MEJDRICH and DOUG SWORD

District of Columbia leaders on Monday warned Congress to stay out of local issues and keep policy riders aimed at D.C. laws away from spending bills, a battle the District fights annually.

House GOP Undecided on Spending Path
Speaker says Republicans still having ‘family conversation’

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., says Republicans are still at the 'family conversation' level of figuring out the appropriations process. Also appearing are, from left, Reps. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Glenn Thompson, R-Pa.. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With a little more than seven legislative weeks before the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30, House Republicans still do not have a consensus on the process for funding the government, fueling some discontent in the conference. 

“We haven’t decided exactly how we’re going to go about our appropriations process in this first year, but we’re going to move together on consensus,” Speaker Paul D. Ryan told reporters after the Republican conference met Wednesday morning.

No Summer Job? Hill Turns to Make-Work Budgeting
Broken appropriations system is no friend to unified GOP government

President Donald Trump and his nominal congressional allies have fallen far behind the budgetary schedule, creating a policymaking void, Hawkings writes. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images File Photo)

Approaching a half year back in control over Washington, Republicans still lack decent prospects for securing their first meaningful legislative accomplishment — and so they’re anxiously casting about for something productive to do with their summer.

But their most readily available option, trying to create at least the appearance of restoring some regular order to routine appropriations, is essentially guaranteed to generate little beyond disappointment.

House Appropriators Float 12-Bill Omnibus Before Recess
Package would likely be dead on arrival in the Senate

Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., has an ambitious Omnibus plan to address the already behind-schedule government funding process. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans are weighing an ambitious plan to pass a 12-bill appropriations package for fiscal 2018 ahead of the August recess, top GOP appropriators told CQ Roll Call on Thursday.

The package effectively would be an instant omnibus — one that consists of 12 spending bills written by the GOP-controlled House Appropriations Committee.