Trade

National Children’s Museum Means Changes for Federal Triangle
Beleaguered museum looks to make third time the charm

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, shown here in May, welcomed home the National Children’s Museum on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the National Children’s Museum seeks to relaunch a half-block from the Mall, the Federal Triangle metro stop could get a rebranding of its own.

The museum — after years of nomadism and financial struggles — is slated to open in March, and a D.C. councilman says he will push to rename the stop.

Schneider Combines Cycling Passion With Public Outreach
Illinois congressman invites constituents to bike with him on Father’s Day

Rep. Brad Schneider poses with participants in his “Bike the Tenth” bicycle town hall. (Courtesy of Steven Kirsch in Rep. Brad Schneider's office)

Illinois Democrat Brad Schneider hosted a rather unconventional town hall this weekend as he and a group of constituents biked 15 miles around his district and chatted about policy issues.

“It was a great opportunity to combine my passion for cycling with the ability to connect with constituents” Schneider said. “We continue to look for creative ways of making those connections.”

How Donald Trump Shivved a Compromise GOP Immigration Bill
Aides were caught unaware by president's announcement

President Donald Trump greets mostly Republican members after addressing a joint session of Congress last year. On Friday, he appeared to end hopes a compromise immigration bill the conference hammered out would make it to the floor. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 3:03 p.m. Senior White House officials worked with House Republicans for weeks on a compromise immigration measure, but were careful to avoid saying anything publicly that would sink the measure. That changed Friday morning when President Donald Trump walked out to the White House’s North Lawn.

House Republicans reached agreement on a sweeping immigration overhaul measure after conservatives, moderates and leaders negotiated behind closed doors for weeks — with White House legislative affairs director Marc Short also involved. Members said Thursday they had reached a deal to vote on two measures: a measure favored by conservatives and a compromise version in which all sides gave some ground.

Trump Hits FBI, Defends N.Korea Summit in Wild Driveway Scene
President: Without Singapore summit, ‘you’re going to have nuclear war’

U.S. President Donald Trump crosses the South Lawn after arriving at the White House on May 5, 2018, in Washington, D.C. (Zach Gibson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump suggested Friday outside the White House that former FBI Director James B. Comey should be jailed and his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un averted “nuclear war.”

Trump broke with decades of protocol and ventured out to the executive mansion’s North Lawn to do a live interview with Fox News. He stayed outside with Secret Service agents scanning nearby Pennsylvania Avenue and Lafayette Park for nearly an hour, taking a half hour of questions from a Fox anchor then another 30 minutes of questions from White House correspondents.

White House Hits China With New Tariffs, Ramping up Trade War
‘This situation is no longer sustainable,’ Trump says

The White House on Friday slapped new tariffs on some Chinese goods, further ramping up the Trump administration's trade conflict with allies and rivals. (Sgt. Mikki L. Sprenkle/U.S. Army)

The White House on Friday announced it is slapping tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese goods in response to alleged intellectual property theft, another escalation in President Donald Trump’s trade-related acts against allies and rivals alike.

“This situation is no longer sustainable. China has, for example, long been engaging in several unfair practices related to the acquisition of American intellectual property and technology,” President Donald Trump said in a statement released Friday morning that formally announced 25 percent import penalties on some Chinese-made products.

Pete Olson on Respect in Congress: ‘We’ve Lost That’
Texas Republican shares what he learned as a staffer

Rep. Pete Olson, R-Texas, was Sen. John Cornyn’s first chief of staff. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Pete Olson tries to make sure his staffers get home at a reasonable hour because he remembers long nights on the Senate floor, endless debates and the chaos of 9/11.

Before he ran for Congress in 2008, the Texas Republican worked for Sen. Phil Gramm and his successor John Cornyn, now the majority whip.

How Life Imitates the Congressional Baseball Game
The annual classic brings out a softer side of the legislative branch

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., escorted by U.S. Capitol Police Special Agent David Bailey, leaves the House Republican Conference meeting at the Capitol Hill Club in Washington on Wednesday. Scalise was shot and injured last year at a practice for the Congressional Baseball Game. Bailey was also injured in the attack. Unable to play last year because of his injuries, Scalise will be on the field at Thursday’s game. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The spectacle of politics and how it fits, or doesn’t, into the nation’s culture. Subscribe to our newsletter here.

“This game is a situation of which, you’re a product of your political success, so if you have a good political year, you have a good recruiting year for this game.” So said former Rep. David Bonior, D-Mich., many years ago about the Congressional Baseball Game and the teams each party gets to field. 

Bank Seizes Valadao’s Family Farm
California congressman blames ‘burdensome government regulations’

The family of Rep. David Valadao, R-Calif., had its dairy farm seized because of unpaid loans. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bank seized a farm owned by California Rep. David Valadao and his family after they failed to repay $8.3 million in loans.

Court documents show that in November, agriculture lender Rabobank sued Triple V Dairy in Fresno Superior Court for failing to repay the loans, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Analysis: The House Blue Wave Is Alive and Well
In the generic ballot and presidential approval numbers, fundamentals remain unchanged

Reports of the receding of a blue wave have been exaggerated, Rothenberg writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For the last couple of months, I’ve heard from many quarters that the “blue wave” has dissipated. Meh. 

Advocates of that view usually point to the RealClearPolitics generic ballot average or Donald Trump’s job approval ratings, which suggest the president’s popularity has risen and the Democratic House advantage fallen.

Corker Unloads on Republicans for Being Afraid of Trump
Tennessee Republican said Republicans fear upsetting POTUS before midterms

Watch: Corker Chastises Fellow Republicans for Blocking His Tariff Amendment

 Sen. Bob Corker unloaded on his fellow Republicans for cowering from President Donald Trump.