voting

Late Night Votes Ahead: House Considering 4-Bill Spending Package Before Recess

Republican House leadership is confident they have the votes to pass a four-bill “minibus” spending package before heading out for the August recess. They’re slated to leave town Friday, July 28. The minibus includes Defense, Energy-Water, Legislative Branch and Military Construction-VA funding (66 percent of discretionary spending for the government), as well as funding for a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico, according to Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy. See the video for more details on the House’s busy week.

House and Senate Preview: Obamacare Repeal Set Up and Trump Cabinet Hearings

Heading to Vote? Highlights of Ballot Measures Across the Country
 

The presidential race isn't the only thing on the ballot. Besides congressional, state and local races, voters in 33 states will also be asked to decide on 157 measures — ranging from marijuana legalization to minimum wage changes — on Nov. 8. Here are some highlights.

Voting Rights Groups Brace for Election Day ‘Chaos‘
Reports of disenfranchisement already cropping up during early voting

Voting rights advocates are preparing for the first presidential election since 1964 without the full protections of the Voting Rights Act. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Voting rights advocates are preparing for a “perfect storm of chaos” on Election Day — and not just because a hurricane has already affected registrations in some key battleground states.

Reports of voter disenfranchisement have already cropped up during early voting, the advocates say. Some Texas election officials are implementing a voter ID law that a federal appeals court struck down as discriminatory. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said he fears the election will be rigged and urged voters to “go out and watch the polls,” prompting fears of voter intimidation among minorities, particularly.

Recent Breaches Raise Fears of Voting System Hacks
'Best Practices' considered for state and local election officials

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson says the administration is weighing putting the electoral system on a par with the power grid and the financial sector, categorizing it as critical infrastructure. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In an already topsy-turvy presidential campaign, the recent breaches of Democratic Party computer networks have fueled fears about potential foreign meddling and raised questions about how secure the electronic systems that record and tally votes across the country are from sophisticated hackers.  

For years, computer security experts have warned that electronic voting is vulnerable to hacking that could alter vote tallies and theoretically swing an election. The intrusions that compromised the Democratic National Committee and the House Democrats’ fundraising campaigns’ systems — both of which cybersecurity experts have blamed on groups linked to Russian intelligence agencies — have only heightened those concerns.  

Khan DNC Speech Drives Spike in Voter Registration Searches
Inquiring minds Googled registration, third party candidates

Khizr Khan, father of Army Capt. Humayun Khan, who was killed in Iraq, delivered one of the most powerful speeches on the final night of the Democratic National Convention. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Trend watchers noticed a spike in online searches about voter registration even before Khizr Khan left the stage after his passionate rebuke of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump during Thursday's last night of the Democratic National Convention.  

"Tonight we are honored to stand here as parents of Capt. Humayun Kahn and as patriotic American Muslims," the Pakistani immigrant said in a loving tribute to his son, an Army captain killed while serving in Iraq.  

Judicial Watch Argues McAuliffe Can't Restore Voter Rights for Felons
Virginia governor's executive order granted voting rights to 206,000 convicted felons

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said his executive order was a continuation of previous Virginia governors' work to help felons regain their right to vote. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A conservative government watchdog group has filed a lawsuit challenging Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe's executive order that restored voting rights for hundreds of thousands of convicted felons.  

In its complaint , filed Monday, Judicial Watch said McAuliffe's order  overstepped his bounds and that adding 206,000 felons to the voting rolls dilutes and cancels out the votes of legally registered Virginians.