barack-obama

Trump Wants Russia Investigation to Look at Obama White House
President appears to shift messaging on Mueller investigation

President Donald Trump on Wednesday asked why the Obama administration isn’t under investigation since Russian meddling in U.S. elections happened on his watch. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is suggesting that special counsel Robert S. Mueller III should expand his probe of Russia’s election meddling to include top Obama administration officials.

Trump’s veiled suggestion that former President Barack Obama and his team be investigated instead of him and his campaign advisers is part of a shift in the president’s messaging in recent days.

Trump Re-Ups Criticism of Obama’s Handling of Russia
POTUS pins blame on predecessor for Russia meddling in U.S. elections

President Donald Trump continued his Twitter attack on former President Barack Obama on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump kept his foot on the gas on Twitter Tuesday blaming his predecessor for Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. elections, annexation of Crimea, and swelling influence in Syria.

The Democrats’ interest in the Russian affair, Trump alleged, arose only after he won the election.

After Shooting, Trump Focuses on Mental Health, Not Guns
President says safety at schools will be priority, not limiting access to firearms

Members of the West Ohio Minutemen practice their right to carry firearms near the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, July 19, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An American citizen’s use of a military-style semi-automatic weapon to carry out a mass murder on U.S. soil thrust President Donald Trump into a somber spotlight on Thursday, and he sent a clear signal he views the incident as about mental health, not guns.

The president offered his condolences to the loved ones of the 17 people law enforcement officials say 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz shot dead at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. He also spoke in the same measured tone he and his predecessor, Barack Obama, have used following shooters’ murderous rampages.

Analysis: Trump Takes the Budget Out of Budget Day
‘This is going to be awful,’ Mulvaney says of own budget briefing

President Donald Trump speaks earlier this month at a Republican retreat in West Virginia. He has yet to make a public pitch for his 2019 budget proposal. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sometimes it’s what a president doesn’t say that reveals his true priorities. That certainly appears to be the case with Donald Trump’s second budget request.

The Trump administration is asking Congress to spend $4.4 trillion in taxpayer funds, but the president has shown little interest in selling the fiscal 2019 request. The chief executive had multiple opportunities Monday and Tuesday to speak into microphones and use his bully pulpit to advocate for the spending priorities. Instead, he focused on other matters.

Trump Likely Has Authority To Extend DACA Deadline, Experts Say
Competing camps within administration further complicate murky situation

Immigration rights demonstrators march in September from the White House to the Trump International Hotel and the Justice Department to oppose President Trump's decision to end the DACA program. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Legal experts dispute a claim from some senior Trump administration officials that President Donald Trump lacks the legal authority to extend his own deadline for ending an immigration program that protects nearly 700,00 people from deportation.

Senior White House and Cabinet officials in recent days have sent mixed messages about whether Trump could merely amend a September executive order that gave Congress until March 5 to legalize the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Work Grinds to Plod Amid Memo Battle, Trump Attacks
Democratic document heads to president as he accuses the author of treason

House Intelligence ranking member Adam B. Schiff, center, and panel members Eric Swalwell, left, and Joaquin Castro, arrive Monday for a vote on releasing a Democratic response to a Republican memo. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Work in Washington slowed to a plod Monday as the House Intelligence Committee’s disagreements over the Russia probe again bled into public view and President Donald Trump spent the day accusing Democrats of serious crimes.

The Intelligence panel voted Monday evening, unanimously, in favor of releasing a Democratic memo rebutting one compiled by Chairman Devin Nunes, made public last week, that alleges senior law enforcement officials improperly secured warrants in the Russia election meddling investigation.

Opinion: Is There Room for Science and Evidence in Trump’s Budget?
Administration should not ignore this key protocol in policymaking

President Donald Trump would be wise to follow the model of his predecessors, including Barack Obama, in using science and evidence in his budget’s policy proposals, Hart and Shea write. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

More than a year after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, it is surprisingly difficult to know where the administration stands in the debate about evidence-based policymaking. Inconsistent signals across government agencies suggest the lack of a uniform philosophy about how science and evidence inform policy decisions that affect the American public.

Policymaking informed by evidence can improve outcomes, make public policies more effective and efficient, and help restore flagging trust in our government institutions. Because of the existing bipartisan support for evidence-based policymaking, we remain optimistic that the administration can and will responsibly support the use of science and evidence.

The State of the Union in Trump's Words: American, Great and Tax
Analysis of how his speech stacks up to his past big addresses

President Donald Trump speaks during the joint session of Congress to deliver his State of the Union Address in the Capitol on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

During his first State of the Union address Tuesday night, President Donald Trump continued the nationalist theme he emphasized during his campaign, mentioning America or some variation 79 times. His other top mentions were the words “great” (26 times) and “tax” (15 times).

Here’s a look at the topics that Trump covered and how his use of certain words compares to his previous major speeches as a president and a candidate, and to President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union in 2016.

State of the Union Latest Marching Order for Marc Short
Legislative affairs director is ultimate utility player for Team Trump

Marc Short, White House legislative affairs director, talks with reporters in the Capitol on Nov. 13. He has become an unlikely messenger for President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For Marc Short, the work began in earnest the moment President Donald Trump wrapped up his first official State of the Union address on Tuesday night.

Short, the White House legislative affairs director, played a role in crafting the president’s speech. But he told Roll Call in an interview on Monday that the work of crafting, editing and re-crafting the address fell to a team led by Stephen Miller, Trump’s top domestic policy adviser.

A Dozen Democrats Will Skip Trump’s State of the Union Address
Cohen says president is ‘unworthy of the podium, the position and the power’

Reps. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., left, and Danny Davis, D-Ill., right, will not attend President Donald Trump's State of the Union address. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated Jan. 30 2:10 p.m. | Tennessee Rep. Steve Cohen on Tuesday was the 12th Democratic member of Congress to announce that he would boycott President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address.

“I’ve spent 38 years in elected public office, helping make government work and speaking out against corruption because I believe, as President John F. Kennedy believed, that politics is an honorable profession,” Cohen said in a statement. “The current President is the antithesis of that sensibility: a man who appears determined to tear government down, harm the most vulnerable, benefit the rich and destroy foundational institutions such as the Department of Justice and the FBI.”