conservatives

Democrats may come to regret choosing impeachment over independents
Base voters may be happy, but they won’t be the ones deciding the 2020 election

The Democrats’ impeachment push may please the base, but it could cost them with independents in 2020, Winston writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — Put yourself, for a moment, in the shoes of average independent American voters in fly-over country where next year’s election is likely to be decided. Many, if not most, are probably feeling trapped by what amounts to a constant barrage of white noise coming out of Washington these days.

Ukraine. Doral. Impeachment. Syria. Schiff and Pelosi. Hunter and Joe. Trump and Trump. Impeachment. Secret hearings and secret Russian “assets.” Impeachment.

Trump ‘lynching’ tweet just latest impeachment myth — from both sides
Inquiry has featured misleading statements thrust into ether by GOP and Dems, muddying probe

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 10. His comparison of the ongoing impeachment inquiry to a "lynching" drew bipartisan criticism. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump’s comparison of his possible impeachment as a “lynching” set off a war of words Tuesday between his staunchest defenders and his fiercest critics. Accusations have flown back and forth during the nearly month-old inquiry, but they have not always rung accurate — or been even remotely true.

Trump’s “lynching” tweet is a prime example of the latter, with even some of his political allies making a rare break with a president who still has the support, according to multiple polls, of nearly 90 percent of Republican voters. But both sides have been guilty of pushing myths about how this impeachment is playing out and the nature of the constitutionally based process.

Capitol Ink | Rallying the troops

Record lobbying tab racked up by FreedomWorks on health care
Conservative group spent more in third quarter alone than all of last year combined

Activists participate in a rally hosted by FreedomWorks on Sept. 26, 2018. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

The conservative lobbying and grassroots group FreedomWorks disclosed spending more than $2.7 million, the most it ever has reported shelling out, for federal lobbying campaigns in just three months this year.

Opposition to health care proposals such as “Medicare for All” and a Democrat-backed bill that would rein in prescription drug prices drove much of the work, said Jason Pye, FreedomWorks’ vice president of legislative affairs.

Democrats and Republicans criticize Trump after he calls impeachment a ‘lynching’
‘What the hell is wrong with you?’ Democratic Rep. Rush asks president

President Donald Trump makes remarks during the inaugural meeting of the White House Opportunity and Revitalization Council with Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy Joe Grogan, left, and council Executive Director Scott Turner in the Cabinet Room at the White House in April. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

Conjuring memories of racially motivated murders and drawing an immediate bipartisan backlash, President Donald Trump on Tuesday described House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry as a “lynching.”

Trump made the statement in a morning tweet that began with a warning that “if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights.”

Democrats could tie paychecks to testimony in impeachment inquiry
Little-used provision would deny pay to administration officials seen as stonewalling House investigators

House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff, and the heads of the Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees, in an Oct 1. letter raised the possibility of senior administration officials not getting paid for any time spent stonewalling congressional investigators. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats are threatening to force Trump administration officials’ compliance with their impeachment inquiry by targeting something they hold dear: their paychecks.

Democrats have twice referenced using an obscure provision in the annual Financial Services spending bill, referred to as Section 713, that says any federal employee who “prohibits or prevents, or attempts or threatens to prohibit or prevent” another official from communicating with lawmakers shouldn’t be paid during that time.

Trump sends message to frustrated GOP: ‘I have to do what I have to do’
Experts see cracks in the Hill-White House alliance — but no ‘tipping point’ yet

President Donald Trump arrives on the South Lawn of the White House before speaking to members of the media on Oct. 10. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

“I have to do what I have to do.”

That was President Donald Trump on Monday, resurfacing in public following one of the most turbulent weeks of his presidency — and perhaps the first when congressional Republicans really let their frustrations show.

Capitol Ink | World Series Unity

No evidence to suggest Tulsi Gabbard is a Russian agent, Trump says
President: U.S. never promised to ‘protect the Kurds for the rest of their lives’

Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, speaks with the media at the Iowa State Fair in August. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

There is no evidence to support former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s suggesting that Democratic Rep. and presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard is being supported by the Russian government, President Donald Trump said Monday.

Clinton, the party’s 2016 presidential nominee who lost to Trump, recently criticized the Hawaii lawmaker and said she clearly is “the favorite of the Russians” among the still-crowded Democratic primary field.

Mick Mulvaney, from Washington reformer to chief of graft
No matter what he says, don’t get over it, America

Mick Mulvaney is now at the center of an international corruption scandal he not only tolerated, but may have championed, Murphy writes. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

OPINION — In 2008, days after political newcomer Mick Mulvaney won a seat in the South Carolina state Senate, he told a local newspaper that many voters had suggested that he run for the U.S. House seat held by Democrat John Spratt instead. “I couldn’t stop laughing,” Mulvaney said. “I’m perfectly happy being in the Senate.”

But within a year, Mulvaney was not only challenging Spratt, he defeated him handily in 2010 on a message of reforming Washington and slashing federal spending. “There’s a few things I just think we all believe,” he said in one campaign ad. “We cannot continue to spend money we don’t have.”