corporations

Lawmakers Concerned About Trump’s Pledge to Save China’s ZTE
Schumer claims U.S. president’s help would ‘make China great again’

A ZTE-made mobile device. Trump says he will help the Chinese firm avoid collapse. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Members from both parties reacted skeptically Monday to President Donald Trump’s intention to help troubled Chinese telecommunications company ZTE, saying they were concerned he was reversing his pledge to get tough on Beijing.

Trump campaigned, in part, on altering the United States’ trading relationships with the rest of the world, taking a particularly hard line against China and its practices. In 2011, he went so far as to say “China is raping this country.” So a Sunday tweet by the president raised eyebrows when he announced an effort with Chinese President Xi Jinping to “give massive Chinese phone company, ZTE, a way to get back into business, fast.”

CQ Top Editor Steve Komarow Dies
Reporting ranged from the White House to the Khyber Pass

Steve Komarow, CQ Roll Call’s senior vice president and executive editor (CQ/Roll Call file photo) (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Steve Komarow, a veteran foreign correspondent and newsroom leader who served as senior vice president and executive editor at CQ Roll Call, died Sunday after a recent accident and long illness. He was 61.

“Steve and I joined CQ Roll Call in January 2015 and from the outset his intellect and encyclopedic knowledge of Washington was an enormous asset to our coverage and the development of new products,” said Paul McHale, CQ Roll Call’s president. “But that intellect never got in the way of what I will remember most about Steve, his humanity.”

Trump’s Top Economist Talks Tariffs, Provides Zuckerberg Fashion Advice
U.S., Chinese officials having ‘conversations,’ says Kudlow

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives for his meeting with Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., in the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday. Zuckerberg is on Capitol Hill to testify before the House and Senate this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

White House chief economic adviser Lawrence Kudlow said Monday “conversations are going on” between U.S. and Chinese officials about how to resolve their ongoing trade tiff, but he declined to say proposed tariffs definitely will be implemented.

The former CNBC host also criticized Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg executive as he prepares to testify before lawmakers in a scandal that has dinged the company’s bottom line and raised congressional concerns about the social media giant’s role in providing data to political firms influencing the 2016 presidential campaign.

Facebook’s Lobbying Team Faces Test With Zuckerberg on Hill
Zuckerberg intends to approach appearance in a contrite and humble manner, sources say

Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer and founder of Facebook, is leaning on an expanding roster of well-connected lobbyists and message-shapers at his company, as well as a team of outside consultants, to prepare for questions from members of Congress this week. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg’s highly anticipated debut as a congressional witness this week marks an unprecedented step in the company’s decade-long effort to wield influence in the nation’s capital.    

The social media titan is leaning on an expanding roster of well-connected lobbyists and message shapers at his company, as well as a team of outside consultants, to prepare for a host of questions from senators on Tuesday and House members Wednesday. Lawmakers plan to probe everything from a scandal involving Facebook users’ data to the secretive sources of campaign ads on the platform.

Partisan Rancor Ramps Up Over Schiff FISA Memo
As Dems call POTUS hypocrite for withholding memo, GOP says it was unfair

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, is the author of the Democratic response to the House GOP FISA memo. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The usual suspects have shouldered their political quivers as debate rages over the White House’s decision to withhold a Democratic House Intelligence Committee memo rebutting one from the Republican side.

Over the weekend, Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking member of the Intelligence Committee and the memo’s primary curator, repeatedly hammered the president for releasing the Republican memo but not the Democratic one, calling it a hypocritical move.

Trump Lectures Leaders At Davos — But With A Twist
In shift, U.S. president says he is willing to negotiate with Asian nations ‘as a group’

President Donald Trump delivers remarks Friday at a World Economic Forum conference in Davos, Switzerland. (Screen shot via www.weforum.org)

President Donald Trump used part of his address to world and corporate leaders in Davos to lecture them about “unfair” trade practices, saying his administration is trying to “reform the international trading system.”

But he also signaled a shift in thinking, saying he is willing to consider a massive Asia-U.S. trade pact.

Capitol Ink | Tax Cut Christmas

Capitol-Ink-12-14-17

Businesses Say Foreign Payment Treatment May Breach Treaties
Provisions in House and Senate tax bills draw pushback

Ohio Rep. James B. Renacci says issues with the provisions in question must be resolved in conference negotiations. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Business advocates are warning that provisions in the House and Senate tax bills aimed at discouraging offshore migration of multinational operations could trigger trade disputes and retaliation by trading partners because they conflict with tax treaties.

The Semiconductor Industry Association, representing big chipmakers such as Intel Corp., Texas Instruments Inc. and Qualcomm Inc., told Republican leaders in a Dec. 5 letter that it has trade-related concerns about two House and Senate proposals that target multinationals’ payments to foreign affiliates, including payments for parts and other goods used in manufacturing, royalties, interest and management fees.

Capitol Ink | Musical Chair

Analysis: New Senate Tax Bill Solves Some Issues, Raises Others
‘This is largely a partisan exercise,’ McConnell tells CEOs

If there were any doubts that Republicans were bent on advancing the tax bill with only GOP support, those were squashed on Tuesday by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, seen here with Senate Finance Committee Chairman John Cornyn. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The latest version of the Senate bill to overhaul the U.S. tax code solves some problems for Republican leadership, but potentially creates a host of others.

The updated chairman’s mark would direct more tax relief to lower- and middle-class Americans through several new provisions, including a proposed reduction in the tax rates for the current seven income brackets. But those cuts would now be temporary and expire in 2026. At the same time, the proposal would make the reduction in the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 20 percent permanent.