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2 Weeks Out From Election Day, Roll Call’s Guide to the Midterms
Keeping up with the most competitive races and latest outlook for control of Congress

Supporters of Nevada Democratic Senate nominee Jacky Rosen wave signs Friday outside KLASA-TV in Las Vegas before the debate between Rosen and GOP Sen. Dean Heller. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s two weeks until Election Day, and with some parts of the country already engaged in early voting, Roll Call’s coverage of the midterms showcases reporting on the ground in battleground states, the latest political handicapping from our election and political analysts, and a rundown of the most competitive House and Senate races. 

Here’re a few helpful links to race ratings, analysis, stories from the campaign trail, a predict-the-midterms contest and more. We’ll add more as Election Day draws near. 

What Could Have Been: 3 Expectations for Rod Rosenstein’s Canceled Meeting With Lawmakers
Quick turnaround time for the transcript, a possible new investigative precedent for the panel, and angry House conservatives

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will meet with lawmakers behind closed doors Wednesday regarding comments he allegedly made about secretly recording President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated | After weeks of contentious back-and-forth between House GOP lawmakers and Rod Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general was finally set to answer some questions about comments he allegedly made about covertly recording President Donald Trump — until a last-minute postponement, that is, put off the highly anticipated sit-down. 

Rosenstein, who appears to have patched up his relationship with the president after reportedly preparing late last month to tender his resignation, was to field questions from just four leaders on the joint Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform panel — Republican Chairmen Bob Goodlatte and Trey Gowdy and Democratic ranking members Jerrold Nadler and Elijah Cummings.

Senate GOP Forges Ahead With Judicial Nominations Despite More Democratic Opposition
Sen. Patty Murray is against Wednesday hearing for a home state nominee

Assistant Minority Leader Patty Murray opposes holding a hearing on a judicial nominee from her home state while the Senate is away. Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley does not seem to care. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate is still away, but its Judiciary Committee keeps plugging away.

The panel is scheduled to hold another likely sparsely attended confirmation hearing on Wednesday to hear from more of President Donald Trump’s judicial nominees, including a Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals selection opposed by home-state Democratic senators.

Gallego Weighs 2020 Senate Run, Confident About Primary Prospects
Possibility of party winning back House will factor in Arizona Democrat’s decision

Rep. Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz., is weighing a run for Senate in 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

PHOENIX — Rep. Ruben Gallego is focused on helping Democrats win in Arizona in 2018, but he’s also weighing a Senate run of his own in two years time. And he’s confident he would win a Democratic primary.

The Arizona Democrat has previously said he is considering a run for the 2020 special election for the last two years of the late Republican Sen. John McCain’s term. Former GOP Sen. Jon Kyl was appointed to McCain’s seat, but he has said he plans to step down at the end of the year.

Sandra Day O’Connor Leaves a Political and Judicial Legacy
First woman on the Supreme Court was a skilled legislator in Grand Canyon State

Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor testifies during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on “Ensuring Judicial Independence Through Civics Education” on Wednesday, July 25, 2012. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sandra Day O’Connor’s announcement Tuesday that she was stepping away from public life brings into stark relief not just the legacy of the first woman to serve on the Supreme Court, but that of a fading model for what a justice could be: a politician actively engaged in the civic arena.

Citing a dementia diagnosis that would most likely progress to Alzheimer’s disease, the 88-year-old said she was “no longer able to participate in public life,” something that defined her career. 

Democrats Press Dan Coats for Details of Trump’s Chinese Election Meddling Claims
Members of the Senate Intelligence Committee ask if intelligence community will back the president

Sen. Ron Wyden is leading a request for intelligence about Chinese election meddling. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Three Democratic members of the Senate Intelligence Committee want to know whether the actual intelligence backs up President Donald Trump’s claims of election meddling by the Chinese.

“We are writing with regard to President Trump’s most recent comments on foreign interference in U.S. elections, wrote Sens. Ron Wyden of Oregon, Martin Heinrich of New Mexico and Kamala Harris of California, in a letter released Tuesday addressed to Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats.

Trump to Meet Putin Again Next Month After Another White House Reversal
Bolton had said second summit would come after Mueller ends his election probe

President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin arrive for a joint press conference after their summit in July in Helsinki, Finland. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin will meet in Paris next month, their second one-on-one meeting this year as the Justice Department continues looking into whether the president’s 2016 campaign sought help from Moscow.

National security adviser John Bolton made the announcement — another reversal from the White House — in Moscow, where he has been meeting with Russian officials about a decades-old nuclear treaty from which Trump says he intends to withdraw.

Wednesday Won’t Be Your Average Recess Hump Day
Rosenstein testimony, Senate Judiciary, Trump rally to showcase tribal warfare

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be interviewed by the leaders of two House committees on Wednesday, part of a busy time at the Capitol and White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Embattled Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein finally testifies. The Senate Judiciary Committee will continue its autumn of discontent. And President Donald Trump will sign opioids legislation before taking his midterms road show to Wisconsin.

No, Wednesday will not be your typical recess day. Rather, it will be a cable news bonanza chronicling the country’s era of tribal political warfare.

Turkey’s Version of Khashoggi Death ‘Flies in the Face’ of Saudi Claims, Pence Says
Vice president promises an ‘American response’ once White House has all facts

People hold posters of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a protest organized by members of the Turkish-Arabic Media Association at the entrance to Saudi Arabia's consulate on Oct. 8 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Turkish President Recep Erdogan’s description of a Saudi plot to kill Washington journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who died inside a Saudi consulate in Turkey, “flies in the face” of the royal family’s previous descriptions of what happened, Vice President Mike Pence said Tuesday.

“We will look for ways to hold accountable” those Saudis proved to be involved, Pence said.

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
The other Schumer’s list of candidates, Hatch makes another age joke and Kennedy celebrates new historical place

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.