elections

Democrats Go Back on Air in Ohio’s 1st District
New ad spending comes as GOP questions momentum behind Aftab Pureval

Ohio Democrat Aftab Pureval is challenging Rep. Steve Chabot, R-Ohio, in the 1st District. (Courtesy Aftab for Ohio)

Democrats are going back on the air in support of Ohio’s Aftab Pureval, after Republicans seized on a brief lapse in spending early this week to speculate about the viability of his House campaign. 

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee renewed its ad reservation in Ohio’s 1st District on Monday night, which would leave a lag of about one day between the time the previous reservation expired and when the new one goes into effect Wednesday morning, spokeswoman Amanda Sherman said. 

2 Weeks Out From Election Day, Roll Call’s Guide to the Midterms
Keeping up with the most competitive races and latest outlook for control of Congress

Supporters of Nevada Democratic Senate nominee Jacky Rosen wave signs Friday outside KLASA-TV in Las Vegas before the debate between Rosen and GOP Sen. Dean Heller. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s two weeks until Election Day, and with some parts of the country already engaged in early voting, Roll Call’s coverage of the midterms showcases reporting on the ground in battleground states, the latest political handicapping from our election and political analysts, and a rundown of the most competitive House and Senate races. 

Here’re a few helpful links to race ratings, analysis, stories from the campaign trail, a predict-the-midterms contest and more. We’ll add more as Election Day draws near. 

Brady Says Ways and Means Will Work With Trump on 10 Percent Middle-Class Tax Cut
Tax writing chairman’s statement comes after Trump already suggested Brady was working on it

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, says his panel will work with President Donald Trump and his administration to craft the mysterious 10 percent middle-class tax cut bill the president has been talking about lately. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump must’ve spent some time offstage Monday night in Houston talking up his new middle-class tax cut idea to Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady, because the House chief’s tax writer has agreed to take on the project. 

In recent days Trump has started talking about working with Congress on new tax cut legislation focused on providing further relief to the middle-class. He initially said a measure would be unveiled before November 1, revised that to after the election and then reversed the time back to next week.

Gallego Weighs 2020 Senate Run, Confident About Primary Prospects
Possibility of party winning back House will factor in Arizona Democrat’s decision

Rep. Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz., is weighing a run for Senate in 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

PHOENIX — Rep. Ruben Gallego is focused on helping Democrats win in Arizona in 2018, but he’s also weighing a Senate run of his own in two years time. And he’s confident he would win a Democratic primary.

The Arizona Democrat has previously said he is considering a run for the 2020 special election for the last two years of the late Republican Sen. John McCain’s term. Former GOP Sen. Jon Kyl was appointed to McCain’s seat, but he has said he plans to step down at the end of the year.

People Are Googling ‘When is Election Day’ — It Is November 6
Search term reached its peak on Oct. 9

A sign directs voters to the early voting location at the East Las Vegas Community Center in Las Vegas on Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018, the first day of early voting in Nevada. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Election Day is Tuesday, November 6. Despite what you may have heard.

A rumor in North Carolina that independent voters are ineligible for early voting. Fliers in Florida that falsely tell voters who have already mailed in their ballots that they have “not yet returned” them.

Wednesday Won’t Be Your Average Recess Hump Day
Rosenstein testimony, Senate Judiciary, Trump rally to showcase tribal warfare

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be interviewed by the leaders of two House committees on Wednesday, part of a busy time at the Capitol and White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Embattled Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein finally testifies. The Senate Judiciary Committee will continue its autumn of discontent. And President Donald Trump will sign opioids legislation before taking his midterms road show to Wisconsin.

No, Wednesday will not be your typical recess day. Rather, it will be a cable news bonanza chronicling the country’s era of tribal political warfare.

Tester, Rosendale Neck and Neck in Latest Montana Poll
Incumbent holds 3 point lead within error margin

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., walks to the Senate Democrats' policy lunch in the Capitol via the Senate subway tunnel Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Just two weeks before the midterm elections on Nov. 6, Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester held a 3-point advantage over his Republican challenger in a new poll released by the Montana Television Network and Montana State University.

Tester, seeking a third term, led state auditor Matt Rosendale, 46 percent to 43 percent in the survey of registered voters. That’s within the margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points for the poll conducted by mail of more than 2,000 registered voters from late September through early October.

‘Unprecedented’ Gender Gap Found Ahead of Midterms in Wisconsin Poll
Study suggests Democrats should look to turn out women in November

Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., speaks with reporters in the Capitol after the Senate vote to reopen the government in January 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s approval rating among men has climbed to an all-time high in Wisconsin at 59 percent, while his approval among women in the state stands at a paltry 39 percent, according to a new poll.

The gap is reportedly the largest in the history of Marquette Law Schools’ polling and suggests Democrats should look to turn out women in November.

House Midterm Outlook: Look for a Democratic Flip
Two weeks out, all signs still point to Democrats taking the House

Former Vice President Joe Biden appears with Nevada Democratic congressional and state candidates in Las Vegas on Saturday for an early vote rally at the Culinary Workers Union Local 226. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Are we still headed for a Democratic wave in the House next month? That all depends on how you define a wave. But one thing is clear: Democrats are still likely to flip the chamber even after all the buzz about a post-Kavanaugh Republican bounce.

A wave occurs when a large number of one party’s seats flip to the other party, invariably because of a national political figure (the president, usually) or a national issue. Many competitive seats change hands, and at least a few entrenched incumbents suddenly find themselves in trouble.

Can New Jersey’s Leonard Lance Survive a Democratic Wave?
GOP lawmaker faces tough re-election against Democrat Tom Malinowski

Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., voted against the GOP health care plan on the floor last year, but Democrats are still attacking him for voting for it in committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

LEDGEWOOD, N.J. — Nobody dislikes New Jersey Rep. Leonard Lance

The moderate Republican voted against what were supposed to be his party’s major legislative achievements this Congress: the tax overhaul and the repeal of the 2010 health care law. And unlike many of his GOP peers, he’s actually held town hall meetings. His civility and the carefulness with which he chooses his words hark back to a different political era.