energy

Pelosi, DCCC Use Tea Party to Fire Up Dem Voters

Pelosi cites "tea party extremism" in blast mailer to Democratic voters. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic leaders are urging their voting base to fill the party’s campaign coffers as part of an election-year battle against a “tide of tea party extremism.”  

Some political observers believe the tea party -- specifically, the House Freedom Caucus -- will keep its powder dry this year in favor of a number of policy and spending battles in 2017. But the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi see the conservative movement as a way to fire up their base.  

On Unemployment Rate, Obama Spikes the Football

In this photo made using a teleconverter in-between two crop factors, President Barack Obama addresses a crowd of around 15,000 during a state arrival ceremony for Pope Francis on Sept. 23, 2015. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

President Barack Obama on Friday took credit for the latest jobs report, saying the 4.9 percent rate shows his stewardship has made the U.S. economy the “strongest and most durable" in the world.  

The Labor Department on Friday released data that was a mixed bag for both American workers and the Obama administration. The numbers showed the lowest unemployment rate in eight years and rising wages; they also concluded that 151,000 new jobs were created in January, down from three consecutive months during which nearly 300,000 jobs were created per month.  

On Cancer 'Moonshot,' Time is Ticking for Biden

Biden is driving Obama's campaign to cure cancer. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Vice President Joseph R. Biden is widely seen as the engine behind the Obama administration’s “moonshot” anti-cancer push, raising questions about its fate once he leaves office next year.  

The White House on Thursday took the first tangible steps in its fight against cancer, formally establishing a task force first mentioned in President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address. Biden, who will lead the task force, sounded at times bold and cautious.  

Michigan Democrats Want GOP Governor to Lobby for Flint Aid

Schumer, Stabenow and Peters look at poster showing dirty water in Flint during the Senate Democrats' news conference on the lead contaminated drinking water. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Michigan's Democratic senators, who are seeking $600 million in federal dollars to replace Flint's toxic water pipes and support families affected by lead exposure, are hoping the state's GOP governor will lobby his Republican colleagues on Capitol Hill to help foot the bill.  

With Republican support uncertain for a measure assisting Flint, Sen. Debbie Stabenow on Thursday urged Gov. Rick Snyder to use his political connections.  

Senate Women Rule as Work Begins After Blizzard

Murkowski opened the Senate. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When the Senate reconvened Tuesday after a major winter snow storm, Alaska Republican Lisa Murkowski noticed something a bit unusual.  

"You look around the chamber and the presiding officer is female, all of our parlamentarians are female, our floor managers are female, all of our pages our female," Murkowski said, opening the Senate session as Maine Republican Susan Collins sat in the presiding officer's chair.  

Will Obama Issue Executive Action on Cap-and-Trade?

Inhofe. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Obama administration is refusing to make his final year in office as uneventful as Republicans would like. In fact, lawmakers expect executive action on everything from terrorist detention to campaign finance to environmental issues.  

One possibility is an executive action setting up a carbon cap-and-trade system, says Senate Environment and Public Works Chairman James M. Inhofe, R-Okla. President Barack Obama "has legacy things and he doesn’t have as much time as he would like to have,” Inhofe said in an interview. “Cap-and-trade and closing Gitmo, those are the things he wants to do.”  

Was There Ever an Obama-Ryan Honeymoon?

Ryan greets Obama as he arrives to deliver his final State of the Union address while Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. looks on. It was one of Ryan's few smiles of the evening. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Barack Obama repeatedly had to raise his voice to be heard over cheering Democratic lawmakers during his State of the Union address on Jan. 12. But Speaker Paul D. Ryan sat motionless, his face frozen in a polite — but unimpressed — expression.  

Obama used part of his likely final address to a joint session of Congress to extol policy whims long pushed by Democrats like pre-kindergarten “for all” children and a government-led effort to “to make college affordable for every American.” He also called it a “basic fact” that the U.S. “has the strongest, most durable economy in the world,” saying the country is “in the middle of the longest streak of private-sector job creation in history.”  

Parsing Obama’s Words Over 8 Addresses to Congress

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Delivering his final State of the Union address Tuesday, President Barack Obama relied on key phrases and terms that dominate his previous addresses to Congress.  

Obama’s dependence on certain words, however, has changed over the years. When he first addressed Congress as president in 2009, he mentioned terms such as “government,” “tax” and “budget” 59 times. On Tuesday, such terms were used just nine times.  

How Heitkamp Kept Crude Oil From Being 'Keystoned'

Heitkamp said she knew she would have to take a different approach to get a deal on lifting the crude oil export ban. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp wanted to avoid turning the crude oil export ban into the next monster of a Keystone XL Pipeline debate.  

"It took on so much more symbolism," Heitkamp said of the pipeline that became the subject of intense campaigning on both sides. "When we started with this issue, my main goal was to not get 'Keystoned.' To not make this so polarizing that people ... got so hardened on either side that there wasn't an opportunity for negotiation."  

It's A Deal: Republicans Settle for Notable Omnibus Wins

Republicans said Ryan deserved high praise for creating a more inclusive, collaborative environment in the lead-up to the omnibus negotiations. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has been offering members the same refrain since taking the gavel from John A. Boehner two months ago.  

He'd been dealt a bad hand by the old regime, according to the Wisconsin Republican, and the best thing for everyone was to make it through the end of the year so the Republican House can return to "regular order" and run the government as it should.